Fei Tian College - Catalog

1. About Fei Tian College

1.1 Mission

Mission

The mission of Fei Tian College is to provide an outstanding postsecondary education to students that imparts knowledge and skills for professional success, fosters an appreciation of classical virtues, and prepares students for lifelong learning.

Values

Excellence: aspire to the highest quality in academic performance

Integrity: follow the highest ethical standards

Community: build a sense of contribution to community

Vision

Make a positive impact on the world by producing educated individuals of strong moral character who will use their knowledge and skills for the greater good.

1.2 Educational Objectives

Consistent with its mission and educational features, Fei Tian College has developed the following Institutional Learning Outcomes. These seek to ensure the success of undergraduate students both in their college years and beyond:

  1. Students will develop depth of knowledge specific to their field of study, including the methods, practices, and competencies of the field.
  2. Students will demonstrate an ability to critically gather, evaluate, and analyze information so that they may make informed judgements,  solve problems in real-world settings, and engage in ongoing personal and professional development.
  3. Students will develop employable skills and utilize the tools, methods, and practices of their field in a professional or real-world setting.
  4. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop productive professional relationships through effective communication and appropriate interpersonal engagement.
  5. Students will develop knowledge of and perspectives on civilization through the study of history, literature, and the arts spanning from antiquity to the present.
  6. Students will demonstrate an awareness of classical virtues, and how these may be applied towards the betterment of self and community.

1.3 The Fei Tian Difference

Established in 2011, Fei Tian College has grown from one campus offering degrees in two areas of study, to two campuses offering a wide range of programs. Buoyed by a dedicated faculty and passionate community, and blessed by an area rich in both natural and artistic offerings, Fei Tian looks forward to the future ahead.

Why Fei Tian

Fei Tian is a place where both tradition and diversity are celebrated. It’s a place where we learn from the past to create a better future for ourselves and our world.

Steeped in the values of Integrity, Compassion, and Tolerance—which its founders were guided by via their practice of Falun Dafa—the Fei Tian culture is one where each student is supported and carefully nurtured. Its faculty harness their knowledge, and their hearts, to allow each student to reach his or her potential.

Fei Tian is an exciting place of growth, in an area of the country also experiencing growth, and offers quick access to both the Hudson Valley’s beauty and New York City’s verve.

Come see what Fei Tian has to offer!

1.4 Degree Authority

Fei Tian College has been chartered as a spiritually-affiliated nonpublic, nonprofit education corporation by the New York State Board of Regents with authorization to operate postsecondary educational programs since June 21, 2011.

1.5 Accreditation

Fei Tian College has been accredited by the New York State Board of Regents and the Commissioner of Education since February 14, 2014.

1.6 Leadership

The ultimate authority for Fei Tian College rests with the Board of Trustees. The Board is self-perpetuating and elects its own chair and officers. The Board functions with consultation and advice of the President who, in turn, consults with the Provost, the dean(s), the faculty, and other constituents.

The President provides strategic vision and academic and administrative leadership for the College. The Provost shall have such powers and perform such duties as may be assigned by the Board of Trustees or the President. Deans report to the Provost and are responsible for directing an academic division and related areas under the aegis of the Provost. The faculty offer recommendations and have primary responsibility for policy on curriculum, subject matter, methods of instruction, student learning experiences, requirements for admission and graduation, teaching quality, academic freedom, and criteria for positions accorded academic rank.

1.6.1 Board of Trustees

Sen Nieh, PhD
School of Engineering
Catholic University of America, DC

Levi Browde
Entrepreneur, NY

Shantao Lai, PhD
Retired, Vitreous State Laboratory
Catholic University of America, DC

Gail Rachlin
Local Entrepreneur, NY

Jacob Wallenberg
Entrepreneur, NY

Yingnian Wu, PhD
College of Physical Sciences
University of California, Los Angeles, CA

Erping Zhang
Association for East Asian Studies, NY

Y. Joseph Zhao, PhD
Ex-Officio Trustee
Interim President, Fei Tian College

1.6.2 Administrators

Y. Joseph Zhao, PhD
Interim President

Peter Y. Li, PhD
Provost

Vina Lee
Vice President of Performing Arts

Yun Song, PhD
Chief Financial Officer

Grace Freed
Senior Director of Student Services

Ivy Che
Senior Director of Operations

Karen Chang
Senior Director of Advancement and IR

Mary Silver
Library Director

1.7 Notice of Nondiscrimination

Fei Tian College admits students of any race, color, national origin, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the College. In the letter and spirit of applicable laws, it does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, ethnic origin, or any other applicable legally protected status in the administration of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy and as delineated by federal and state law, the College is committed to basing judgments concerning the admission and education of individuals upon their qualifications and abilities.

1.8 Publication Data & Disclaimer

The College Catalog (revision 20230121) was published on Saturday, January 21, 2023, by:

Fei Tian College 14 Jason Place Middletown, NY 10940.

The College reserves the right to amend or supplement the information published in this catalog at any time, including but not limited to withdrawing or modifying the courses or changing the regulations.

©2023 by Fei Tian College. All rights reserved. The material in this catalog may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, in any form, whether in print or electronic media, without express permission from Fei Tian College.

Please send questions or comments to catalog [@] feitian.edu.


2. Academic Calendar

FTC operates year round with three sessions of minimally 15 instructional weeks each. Full-time students are required to enroll in two sessions per year. Students may use the third session to take annual vacation or optional studies.

Below is the primary academic calendar at Fei Tian College. The Cuddebackville campus employs a special calendar to accommodate its performing arts programs.

2022–2023 Academic Year:

2.1 Main Academic Calendar

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2.1.1 Fall Semester 2022

August 10 (Wed) New student workshops begin
August 20 (Tue) Course registration for Fall Semester 2022 closes
August 20 –
September 12
Extended Fall Semester 2022 course registration period for late applicants
August 30 (Tue) Classes begin
September 5 (Mon) Labor Day
September 9 (Fri) Last day to withdraw from the College with a 100% tuition refund

Last day for part-time students to drop a course with a 100% tuition refund

Late add begins. Add requires an instructor’s signed permission
September 10 (Sat) Mid-Autumn Festival
September 23 (Fri) Course add/drop period ends

“W” grade assigned to students who officially withdraw from a course after this date

Last day for tuition adjustment for students who change from full-time to part-time status; no tuition adjustment after this date

Last day to withdraw from the College with a 50% tuition refund

Last day for part-time students to drop a course with a 50% tuition refund

Last day to change or declare a major to be effective in Fall Semester 2022
September 24 (Sat) No refund period begins
September 28 (Wed) “AW” grade assigned for immunization non-compliance
October 10 (Mon) Columbus Day
Mid-Semester
November 15 (Tue) Course registration for Spring Semester 2023 opens
November 18 (Fri) Last day to withdraw from a course with a “W”; a grade of “WF” is assigned after this date
November 24 (Thu) Thanksgiving Day
December 12 (Mon) Classes end
December 20 (Tue) Last day of Fall Semester 2022

2.1.2 Spring Semester 2023

December 7 (Wed) New student workshops begin
December 30 (Fri) Course registration for Spring Semester 2023 closes
December 30 –
February 4
Extended Spring Semester 2023 course registration period for late applicants
January 10 (Tue) Classes begin Course add/drop period begins
January 16 (Mon) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
January 20 (Fri) Last day to withdraw from the College with a 100% tuition refund

Last day for part-time students to drop a course with a 100% tuition refund
January 23 (Mon) Lunar New Year

Late add begins. Add requires an instructor’s signed permission
February 3 (Fri) Course add/drop period ends Census Date

“W” grade assigned to students who officially withdraw from a course after this date

Last day for tuition adjustment for students who change from full-time to part-time status; no tuition adjustment after this date

Last day to withdraw from the College with a 50% tuition refund

Last day for part-time students to drop a course with a 50% tuition refund

Last day to change or declare a major to be effective in Spring Semester 2023
February 4 (Sat) No refund period begins
March 13 – 18
(Mon-Sat)
Spring Break
April 6 (Fri) Last day to withdraw from a course with a “W”; a grade of “WF” is assigned after this date
April 19 (Wed) Course registration period for Fall Semester 2023 opens
May 1 (Mon) Classes end
May 9 (Tue) Last day of Spring Semester 2023

2.1.3 Summer Semester 2023

April 15 (Fri) New student workshops begin
May 15 – June 23 Summer Session I (6 weeks)
May 15 (Mon) Classes begin
June 26 – August 4 Summer Session II (6 weeks)
July 4 (Tue) Independence Day
August 22 (Tue) Last day of classes
August 29 (Tue) Last day of Spring Semester 2023

2.2 Performing Arts Programs Calendar

FTC Cuddebackville operates year-round with three sessions of at least 15 instructional weeks each. This calendar system affords students the opportunity to participate in intensive professional experience electives that the College offers. Full-time students are required to enroll in two sessions per year. Students may use the third session to take annual vacation or optional studies, including practicums and internships.

2022–2023 Academic Year
Summer 2022
Date Activity
April 13 (Wed) New student workshops begin
May 9–11 (Mon-Wed) Orientation
May 12 (Thu) Registration deadline; classes begin
May 13 (Fri) Falun Dafa Day
May 30 (Mon) Memorial Day
July 4 (Mon) Independence Day
July 24 - August 3 (Sun-Wed) Summer Break
September 2 (Fri) Classes end
Fall 2022
Date Activity
August 10 (Wed) New student workshops begin
September 5 (Mon) Labor Day
September 6–7 (Tue-Wed) Orientation
September 8 (Thu) Registration deadline; classes begin
September 10 (Sat) Mid-Autumn Festival
October 10 (Mon) Columbus Day
November 11 (Fri) Veterans Day
November 24 (Thu) Thanksgiving Day
December 23 (Fri) Classes end
Spring 2023
Date Activity
December 7 (Wed) New student workshops begin
January 1 (Sun) New Year’s Day
January 2–4 (Mon-Wed) Orientation
January 5 (Thu) Registration deadline; classes begin
January 16 (Mon) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
January 22 (Sun) Chinese New Year’s Day
February 20 (Mon) Presidents' Day
April 21 (Fri) Classes end
April 24 - May 5 (Mon-Fri) Extension classes
May 23–26 (Mon-Fri) Comprehensive examinations for degree candidates
2023–2024 Academic Year
Summer 2023
Date Activity
Apr 12 (Wed) New student workshops begin
May 10 (Wed-Fri) Orientation, registration deadline
May 13 (Sat) FLDF Day
May 15 (Mon) Classes begin
May 29 (Mon) Memorial Day
May 29 - Jun 11 Reserved for Summer Break
July 4 (Tues) Independence Day
Sept 2 (Sat) Classes end
Fall 2023
Date Activity
Aug 9 (Wed) New student workshops begin
Sept 4 (Mon) Labor Day
Sept 6 (Wed) Classes begin
Nov 23 (Thu) Thanksgiving
Dec 19 (Tue) Classes end
Spring 2024
Date Activity
Dec 6 (Wed) New student workshops begin
Jan 3 (Wed) Orientation and classes begin
Apr 16 (Tue) Classes end
Apr 17 (Wed) - May 4 (Sat) Extension classes (extension/makeup classes, etc.)
May 13–18 (Mon-Sat) Comprehensive exams for degree/diploma candidates

3. Admissions

3.1 How to Apply

Fei Tian College welcomes students of a diverse range of interests and background who seek to fulfill their academic promise in our enriching environment.

Whether you are looking to take your arts training to the next level or gain skills and experience needed for a competitive career or advanced education, we hope Fei Tian College is the right choice for you.

To apply for admissions, visit https://app.feitian.edu. You can download the appropriate application form or fill out the form online.

All applications must be completed in English. If any records are in a language other than English, applicants should include certified translations of those materials. Application fees are non-refundable, and application materials will not be returned.

Before you submit your application, please review the provided application checklist for undergraduate or graduate programs.

3.2 Admission Policies

3.2.1 Application Timeline

Fei Tian College admits students who have demonstrated a high degree of scholastic achievement, intellectual capacity, good character, and, for arts applicants, artistic achievement and aptitude. The College is also seeking those who have an appreciation for the unique educational opportunities at Fei Tian and who stand to truly benefit from such an environment.

Admission to Fei Tian normally takes place at the beginning of each academic session. A student interested in pursuing studies at the College should submit a completed application package at least three months (or five months for international students) prior to the start of the session in which he/she intends to first enroll. In special situations, applications may be accepted at other times.

3.2.2 Nondiscrimination Policy

Fei Tian College admits students of any race, color, national origin, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the College. In the letter and spirit of applicable laws, it does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, ethnic origin, or any other applicable legally protected status in the administration of its educational programs.

In accordance with this policy and as delineated by federal and state law, the College is committed to basing judgments concerning the admission and education of individuals upon their qualifications and abilities.

3.2.3 Rescission Policy

Fei Tian College reserves the right to rescind admission for any applicant whose application materials are found to be insufficient or to contain false information.

3.3 Undergraduate Admission

3.3.1 Programs of Study

Fei Tian’s undergraduate degree programs are rigorous and designed for the serious aspiring scholar or artist who seeks a professional career or advanced studies in the arts or sciences.

The College currently offers the following undergraduate degree programs:

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Arts Management
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Classical Chinese Dance
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Fine Arts and Design
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Stage Production and Design
  • Bachelor of Music in Performance
  • Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences
  • Bachelor of Science in Data Science

3.3.2 Applicant Types

Before submitting an application for admission, prospective applicants should review the categories below to understand how the application will be considered. The categories are not mutually exclusive.

3.3.2.1 Freshman

First-year, or freshman, applicants for undergraduate admission typically either are in high school or have completed the equivalent of a U.S. high school education but have not enrolled in a degree-seeking program.

Applications in this category are evaluated based on the strength of the applicant’s high school coursework, grades, GPA, class rank, and quality of instruction at the applicant’s high school. Strong performance in high school English and history classes is a plus; participation in extracurricular activities, especially in arts and culture, is also valued. In addition, the application essay is an opportunity for applicants to discuss what motivates them to pursue advanced studies at Fei Tian.

Admitted students in this category must present proper evidence of the attainment of a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent by the time of initial enrollment.

3.3.2.2 Transfer

Transfer applicants are individuals who have completed the equivalent of a U.S. high school education and are currently, or have been, enrolled as a degree-seeking student at a college or university that is accredited by a U.S. Department of Education-recognized accrediting agency or an international institution recognized by Fei Tian College.

Evaluation of applications in this category focuses on the applicant’s recent performance in college and high school. In addition, the application essay is an opportunity for transfer applicants to discuss what motivates them to pursue advanced studies at Fei Tian as well as how they feel they can make a positive contribution to the College community.

3.3.2.3 International

Fei Tian College is authorized under U.S. Federal law to enroll eligible nonimmigrant students under the F-1 nonimmigrant visa classification for its undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The Office of International Services is the primary resource for F-1 international students seeking advice on matters related to their F-1 status, including visas, passports, I-20s, and more. Each F-1 student is responsible for complying with F-1 regulations and consulting the Office of International Services when matters that may affect the student’s status arise.

3.3.2.4 Resumed Education

Students who have not registered for courses at the College for one full year or more (excluding those who are away on an approved leave of absence) must apply for readmission or reinstatement if they wish to re-enroll. (Consult the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid for details.) An official transcript from any and all institutions of higher education attended since the last enrollment in Fei Tian College, as well as a written statement explaining the circumstances for non-enrollment, must be submitted with the application.

3.3.2.5 Readmission or Reinstatement

Second degree applicants are individuals seeking an additional degree at the same level but in an essentially different area of study, typically after conferral of the first degree.

Admission in this category is based primarily on the applicant’s audition or interview, recommendations, and motivation to complete a second degree program at Fei Tian. The application process is the same as that for transfer applicants.

3.3.2.6 Second Degree

Second degree applicants are individuals seeking an additional degree at the same level but in an essentially different area of study, typically after conferral of the first degree.

Admission in this category is based primarily on the applicant’s audition or interview, recommendations, and motivation to complete a second degree program at Fei Tian. The application process is the same as that for transfer applicants.

3.3.2.7 Non-Matriculated

Applicants for non-matriculated status are individuals seeking to take course(s) at the College but without being enrolled in a degree program. The College reviews applications for non-matriculated studies selectively.

3.3.3 Declaration of Program and/or Major

All applicants must declare their intended program and/or major at the time of application. Currently, no double program or double major is offered.

Those wishing to apply to multiple performing arts programs at Fei Tian must apply separately to each and indicate which program they would enroll in if admitted to more than one.

For music applicants: Applicants to the music degree programs are admitted through audition on the basis of their principal instrument. An applicant who is equally proficient on a second instrument and wishes to be auditioned on it must list the instrument in the appropriate space on the audition form. However, music students are permitted to major in only one instrument.

3.3.4 English Language Proficiency

The ability to speak, read, and understand English fluently is an important factor in the admission decision.

All applicants who do not fall into any of the following categories must include in their application a test score establishing English-language proficiency:

  • Applicants whose primary language is English and who have graduated from a high school that uses English as the primary language of instruction.
  • Applicants who have earned at least three semester credits of freshman English composition with a grade of at least C+ at colleges or universities accredited by U.S. Department of Education-recognized accrediting bodies.
  • Applicants who have studied for at least three years in a high school or college that uses English as the primary language of instruction.

English proficiency is preferably demonstrated through an official score on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). It may also be proven through performance on other tests and measures such as IELTS (The International English Language Testing Service), the SAT (Evidence-based Reading and Writing section), the ACT exam, or a combination of Lexile (reading) and Accuplacer (writing). The following table lists the minimum scores required.

Test Type Minimum Score
TOEFL 73
SAT (EBRW) 500
IELTS 6
ACT 20
Lexile & Accuplacer (W) 1100 & 4

To submit test scores, please use the following codes.

FTC Middletown

  • C357 for TOEFL
  • 7691 for SAT
  • 7993 for ACT

FTC Cuddebackville

  • 7077 for TOEFL and SAT

In lieu of a standardized English proficiency test, Fei Tian College will conduct an interview with the applicant to determine their English proficiency.

3.3.5 Chinese Language Proficiency

Proficiency in Chinese is desirable but not required for admission to Fei Tian’s classical Chinese dance and East-West music programs. Applicants to these programs who do not demonstrate Chinese proficiency should be prepared to take Chinese language courses required to graduate.

3.3.6 Admission Requirements

Admission to Fei Tian’s undergraduate degree programs requires all of the following:

  • Attainment of a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent
  • Background or demonstrated interested in the chosen field of study
  • Good character

However, these requirements serve merely as a threshold to admission. The admission decision is based on a comprehensive evaluation of the application package. Furthermore, for dance and music applicants, the applicant’s audition is a key component.

3.3.7 Application Process

3.3.7.1 Application Checklist

A complete application for graduate admission includes the following materials:

Application Form

First, complete the undergraduate application form. Visit Apply Now to see how to download and submit the form.

Application Fee

An application fee ($50) is required. Students with financial need are welcome to complete the Financial Aid Application to find out whether they qualify for an application fee waiver. Eligibility for application fee waivers is determined by Fei Tian College.

Transcripts

Applicants are required to submit an official academic transcript from each secondary school and college or university attended.

Test Scores

Submission of SAT or ACT test scores is optional.

However, applicants whose native language is not English must establish English-language proficiency through submission of an appropriate test score (see the English Language Proficiency section for details). Applicants who are required but unable to take an English Language Proficiency test may include in their application a request for an SAT/ACT waiver. If the request is granted, the applicant will be administered an alternative academic background assessment exam.

Submission of a test score establishing Chinese-language proficiency is optional.

Personal Statement

Applicants are required to submit a 1–2 page (750 to 1,000 words) personal statement to discuss why they wish to pursue studies at Fei Tian.

Recommendations

Applicants are required to provide two letters of recommendation: one must be from a teacher of an academic subject, counselor, or supervisor of the applicant. For dance and music applicants, one must be from a primary arts teacher of the applicant.

Performance Recording

Applicants to the BFA in Dance or Classical Chinese Dance degree program must submit a 15-minute video file of the applicant performing classical Chinese dance and/or another dance form. The video must have been made within six months of the date of application. The recording must be unedited and clearly labeled with the applicant’s full name and a list of the repertoire performed therein. After review of the recording and application, applicants who advance to the next round may be scheduled for a live audition.

Applicants to the BM in Performance degree program must submit a 15–20-minute unedited video recording of the applicant performing the selected repertoire. For Western instrument applicants, repertoire must be from the Baroque, Classical, and/or Romantic periods. Applicants should choose works that best represent their individual artistry. The recording must have been made within six months of the date of application. Recordings must be clearly labeled with the applicant’s full name, instrument, and a list of the repertoire performed therein. It is not required that the technical quality of the recording be up to professional studio standards, but the sound quality should be as good as is feasible. After review of the recording and application, applicants who advance to the next round may be scheduled for a live audition.

The media type of the video could be a viewable online video link (e.g., YouTube or Vimeo) or a video file sharing link (e.g., Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Dropbox), of the applicant’s performance.

Portfolio

BFA in Stage Production and Design: applicants must submit a portfolio of relevant material that clearly establishes the applicant’s aptitude as a stage technician or designer. The portfolio must be clearly labeled with the applicant’s full name and a list of the materials contained. After review of the portfolio and application, applicants who advance to the next round may be scheduled for an interview.

BFA in Fine Arts and Design: applicants for this program must submit a portfolio of relevant material that clearly establishes the applicant’s prior experience as in painting and/or design. The portfolio must be clearly labeled with the applicant’s full name and a list of the materials contained.

Photographs

Dance applicants are required to submit, in digital format of > 800x600 pixels, at least two recent photographs of the applicant showing full-body frontal view and full-body back view in form-fitting attire.

Special Considerations

While the College specifies standard requirements for admission, it also admits individuals with special talents and circumstances on the following exceptional bases:

  • An exceptional background or performance in courses related to the intended program of study, as demonstrated by achievements in competitions, standardized tests, awards, etc.
  • An exceptional level of artistic or academic achievement or potential.
  • Great motivation and maturity in challenging situations.

Some individuals, if enrolled, may need remedial coursework that could extend the time needed to complete their programs.

Optional Additional Documents

Applicants are welcome to submit any additional academic, artistic, or creative materials they believe will help the admissions committee evaluate their achievement or aptitude.

3.3.7.2 Applying

When you are ready to apply, go to https://app.feitian.edu and follow instructions there.

3.3.7.3 Pre-screening

Submitted applications are sorted and screened by the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid and then sent to the appropriate admissions officers within each department. Individual academic departments then review the applications. For music and dance applicants, the departments also draw up a list of applicants for audition.

3.3.7.4 Audition

The Classical Chinese Dance and Music programs require applicants who pass the pre-screening to perform an audition.

The audition for the BFA in Classical Chinese Dance degree program focuses on the performance of classical Chinese dance movement combinations and lasts for approximately one and a half hours. Each auditionee should prepare two contrasting solo dances of up to two minutes each, set to prerecorded music. At the audition, auditionees may be asked to perform movement combinations under the instructions of the audition panel. Those who demonstrate a strong technical foundation during the first part of the audition will be asked to perform one or both of their solo dances. Auditionees may then be invited to perform a brief repertory sequence that will be taught and coached.

Dance applicants are ultimately evaluated as to their potential to become professional artists of classical Chinese dance, based on the following criteria:

  • Potential for a career in dance
  • Body alignment
  • Coordination and flexibility
  • Rhythmic accuracy
  • A physique conducive to classical Chinese dance as a major or career
  • Ability to replicate movement combinations
  • Understanding of the special characteristics of classical Chinese dance
  • Commitment to character development in the process of becoming a professional artist at Fei Tian College

The audition for the BM in Performance degree program focuses on the performance of contrasting works of classical music. Each auditionee should prepare two solo pieces of contrasting styles. For Western instrument auditionees, repertoire must be from the Baroque, Classical, and/or Romantic periods. At least one of the pieces should be set to musical accompaniment. Auditionees who use prerecorded musical accompaniment must bring an audio file of their music to the audition. Alternatively, auditionees may request in writing in the appropriate space on the audition form to use one of the College’s piano accompanists. Auditionees must bring their scores to the audition. At the music audition, auditionees may be invited to perform one or both of their solo pieces. Auditionees may also be asked to perform major and minor scales as well as a sight-reading passage. Auditionees should be familiar with all clefs in common use for their instrument.

Music applicants are ultimately evaluated as to their potential to become professional musicians of classical Western or Chinese music, based on the following criteria:

  • Potential for a career in music
  • Musicianship potential for meeting the technical and artistic standards of FTC Cuddebackville’s undergraduate music degree program
  • Ability to sight-read
  • Appreciation of classical Western and Chinese music and cross-cultural music
  • Commitment to character development in the process of becoming a professional musician at Fei Tian College

3.3.7.5 Decision and Notification

Fei Tian will notify applicants of the admissions decisions and next steps within approximately one month after the audition or interview. International applicants will be given information on the F-1 student visa, including instructions on how to apply for an I-20 from Fei Tian College.

3.3.8 Start Your Application Now!

We are so excited to explore the bright future ahead of you, with you together. Apply Now!

3.4 Graduate Admission

3.4.1 Programs of Study

Fei Tian’s Master’s degree programs are designed for students who have completed prior undergraduate studies and who are interested in advancing their knowledge, skills, and experience in their respective fields of the arts and sciences.

The College currently offers the following Master’s degree programs:

  • Master of Fine Arts in Classical Chinese Dance
  • Master of Fine Arts in Dance
  • Master of Music in Performance
  • Master of Science in Data Science

3.4.2 English Language Proficiency

The ability to speak, read, and understand English fluently is an important factor in the admission decision.

All applicants who do not fall into any of the following categories must include in their application a test score establishing English-language proficiency:

  • Applicants whose primary language is English and who have graduated from a high school that uses English as the primary language of instruction.
  • Applicants who have earned at least three semester credits of freshman English composition with a grade of at least C+ at colleges or universities accredited by U.S. Department of Education-recognized accrediting bodies.
  • Applicants who have studied for at least three years in a high school or college that uses English as the primary language of instruction.

English proficiency is preferably demonstrated through an official score on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). It may also be proven through performance on other tests and measures such as IELTS (The International English Language Testing Service). The following table lists the minimum scores required.

Test Type Minimum Score
TOEFL 73
IELTS 6

To submit test scores, please use the following codes.

FTC Middletown

  • C357 for TOEFL

FTC Cuddebackville

  • 7077 for TOEFL

In lieu of a standardized English proficiency test, Fei Tian College will conduct an interview with the applicant to determine their English proficiency.

3.4.3 Graduate Admission Requirements

Admission to a Master’s degree program at Fei Tian requires all of the following:

  • Attainment of a baccalaureate degree in a related field
  • Prior training and/or experience in the performance or teaching of the art form (for dance, music, and fine arts majors only)
  • Ability and desire to collaborate with other artists and colleagues
  • High degree of artistic achievement
  • Good character, as evidenced through recommendation(s)

However, these requirements serve merely as a threshold to admission. The admission decision is based on a comprehensive evaluation of the application package and, for dance and music applicants, the audition.

3.4.4 Application Process

3.4.4.1 Application Checklist

A complete application for graduate admission includes the following materials:

Application Form

First, complete the graduate application form. Visit Apply Now to see how to download and submit the form.

Application Fee

An application fee ($75) is required. Students with financial need are welcome to complete the Financial Aid Application to find out whether they qualify for an application fee waiver. Eligibility for application fee waivers is determined by Fei Tian College.

Test Scores

Applicants are required to present proof of English-language proficiency through submission of either an appropriate test score (see the English Language Proficiency section for details) or an official transcript verifying completion of baccalaureate studies at an institution of higher education that uses English as the primary language of instruction.

Applicants who are required but unable to take an English Language Proficiency test may include in their application a request for a waiver. If the request is granted, the applicant will be administered an alternative academic background assessment exam.

Submission of a test score establishing Chinese-language proficiency is optional.

Curriculum Vitae

Applicants are required to submit a CV detailing the applicant’s prior experience in the respective field, education, scholarship, professional experience, and/or public leadership, accompanied by a portfolio of relevant material that clearly establishes the applicant’s prior experience in the field.

Personal Statement

Applicants are required to submit a personal statement of 750 to 1,000 words discussing the applicant’s aspirations, focus, vision, and objectives in the chosen field of study.

Recommendations

Applicants are required to provide two letters of recommendation from qualified academic or professional personnel regarding the applicant’s strengths and suitability for the intended graduate program.

Performance Recording

Applicants to the MFA in Classical Chinese Dance degree program must submit a 15-minute video file of the applicant performing classical Chinese dance. The video must have been made within six months of the date of application. The recording must be unedited and clearly labeled with the applicant’s full name and a list of the repertoire performed therein. After review of the recording and application, applicants who advance to the next round may be scheduled for a live audition.

Applicants to the MM in Performance degree program must submit a 15–30-minute unedited video recording of the applicant performing the selected repertoire. For Western instrument applicants, repertoire must be from the Baroque, Classical, and/or Romantic periods. Applicants should choose works that best represent their individual artistry and highest technical ability. The recording must have been made within six months of the date of application. Recordings must be clearly labeled with the applicant’s full name, instrument, and a list of the repertoire performed therein. It is not required that the technical quality of the recording be up to professional studio standards, but the sound quality should be as good as is feasible. After review of the recording and application, applicants who advance to the next round may be scheduled for a live audition.

The media type of the video could be a viewable online video link (e.g., YouTube or Vimeo), or a video file sharing link (e.g., Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Dropbox), of the applicant’s performance.

Photographs

Dance applicants are required to submit, in digital format of > 800x600 pixels, at least two recent photographs of the applicant showing full-body frontal view and full-body back view in form-fitting attire.

Special Considerations

While Fei Tian specifies standard requirements for admission, it also admits individuals with special talents and circumstances on the following exceptional bases:

  • Exceptional talent in the field
  • Exceptional motivation

Such individuals, if enrolled, may need remedial coursework, which could extend the time needed to complete their programs.

Optional Additional Documents

Applicants are welcome to submit any additional academic, artistic, or creative materials they believe will help the admissions committee evaluate their achievement or aptitude.

3.4.4.2 Applying

When you are ready to apply, go to https://app.feitian.edu and follow instructions there.

3.4.4.3 Pre-screening

Submitted applications are sorted and screened by the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid and sent to the appropriate admissions officers within each department. For dance and music applications, individual academic departments then review the applications and draw up a list of applicants for audition.

3.4.4.4 Audition

The Classical Chinese Dance and Music programs require applicants who pass the pre-screening to perform an audition.

The audition for the Master of Fine Arts in Classical Chinese Dance degree program consists of a condensed class in classical Chinese dance technique and lasts for approximately one and a half hours. Each auditionee should prepare a solo dance that the auditionee has learned or choreographed, set to prerecorded music playable from an MP3 player or similar device.

Dance applicants are ultimately evaluated as to their potential to become leading professional artists in the field of classical Chinese dance, based on the following criteria:

  • Prior systematic training in classical Chinese dance or dance competency
  • Prior professional experience in dance performance, choreography, and/or dance teaching
  • Experience or exhibiting keen interest in using the form of classical Chinese dance as a means of cross-cultural transmission of traditional culture
  • Commitment to developing character as an integral part of becoming a leading professional artist in the field

The audition for the Master of Music in Performance degree program focuses on the performance of solo works that demonstrate the candidate’s highest skill level. For Western instrument auditionees, repertoire must be from the Baroque, Classical, and/or Romantic periods. Each auditionee should prepare two solo works of contrasting styles composed prior to 1900, at least one of which is a required piece chosen from a list provided by the department, and which in total do not exceed 30 minutes in playing length. A departmental accompanist shall be provided for the audition. Auditionees must bring their scores to the audition. Auditionees may be asked to sight-read a passage of music.

Music applicants are ultimately evaluated based on whether they have the potential to become leading professional musicians, based on the following criteria:

  • Prior undergraduate training in applied instrument or vocal studies or music competency
  • Prior experience in solo performance, ensemble performance, music composition, and/or music teaching
  • Experience or exhibiting keen interest in using the form of music as a means of cross-cultural transmission of traditional culture
  • Commitment to developing character as an integral part of becoming a leading professional artist in the field

3.4.4.5 Decision and Notification

Fei Tian will notify applicants of the admissions decisions and next steps within approximately one month after the audition. International applicants will be given information on the F-1 student visa, including instructions on how to apply for an I-20 from Fei Tian College.

3.4.5 Start Your Application Now!

We are so excited to explore the bright future ahead of you, with you together. Apply Now!

3.5 International Applicants

Fei Tian College is authorized under U.S. Federal law to enroll eligible nonimmigrant students under the F-1 nonimmigrant visa classification for its undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The Office of International Services is the primary resource for F-1 international students seeking advice on matters related to their F-1 status, including visas, passports, I-20s, and more. Each F-1 student is responsible for complying with F-1 regulations and consulting the Office of International Services when matters that may affect the student’s status arise.

3.5.1 Application and Entrance Procedure

International applicants follow the regular admissions procedure. As a special consideration, however, the College may grant international dance and music applicants permission to send samples or videos of their performances in lieu of a live audition.

Upon being admitted to the College, international students will receive in their admissions package important travel and F-1 information and an I-20 application form. If a student decides to enroll in Fei Tian under the F-1 visa classification, the student must submit to the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid a completed I-20 application and required supporting documentation, along with a completed Intent to Enroll Form.

Upon review by the Office of International Services, the College will create an initial Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) record and issue a I-20 Form to the student.

It is the student’s responsibility to sign the I-20 Form and keep it safe, pay the required I-901 SEVIS fee (refer to www.ice.gov/sevis for detailed information), and obtain an F-1 student visa (see Applying for an F-1 Student Visa) if the student is not currently studying in the U.S. with an active F-1, or unless he or she is from a visa-exempt country (i.e., Canada or Bermuda).

After entering the United States, all international students must report to the Office of International Services within 30 days of the program start date listed on the I-20 Form to validate their intended participation at the College. Failure to do so may invalidate a student’s legal status in the U.S.

International students are required to keep all versions of their I-20 Form and their passport, visa (or I-94 for Canadian/Bermudan citizens), and other official documents in a safe and accessible place and pay attention to their respective expiration dates.

3.5.2 Applying for an F-1 Student Visa

The following categories of students must obtain an F-1 student visa issued by the Department of State at a local U.S. consulate or embassy:

  • International students outside the U.S. who are not citizens of a visa-exempt country
  • International students in the U.S. but not in a legal status that allows them to study, except those from a visa-exempt country

Students must complete the online DS-160 visa application (https://ceac.state.gov/genniv) and schedule an appointment for a visa interview. The following documentation must be brought to the interview:

  • I-20 Form from Fei Tian College, and any old I-20s
  • Printed confirmation page from the Form DS-160 “Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application”
  • Passport valid for at least six months after the student plans to enter the United States
  • Recent passport-style photograph, two inches by two inches
  • Receipt for the I-901 SEVIS fee payment
  • Receipt for the visa application fee payment
  • Evidence of sufficient funds to cover tuition and living expenses for at least the first year of study
  • Admission letter from Fei Tian College
  • Fei Tian College Catalog
  • Official transcripts and diplomas from previous study

Students from visa-exempt countries need not apply for visas at their local U.S. consulates, and should instead bring the relevant documents to the U.S. port of entry and apply for F-1 nonimmigrant student status upon entering the United States.

3.5.3 Transferring to Fei Tian

F-1 students currently studying at another U.S. institution (including high school) who intend to begin full-time studies at Fei Tian College must pre-arrange to have their SEVIS records transferred to Fei Tian College. In addition to the normal international admissions and entrance procedure, such students must submit a completed F-1 SEVIS Record Transfer Request Form with the completed I-20 application and required supporting documentation in order for their SEVIS records to be transferred to Fei Tian College. Contact the Office of International Services for detailed instructions.

3.6 I’m Accepted! What’s Next?

Congratulations on your acceptance to Fei Tian College! We are excited to have you join us. This checklist will help you get started with studying at Fei Tian College.

Confirm Your Acceptance

Please carefully review your acceptance letter from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid and follow instructions in your letter for completing your intent to enroll.

Finance Your Education

Many talented Fei Tian students qualify for different types of financial aid. Visit the Financial Aid section to explore your options.

Register for On-Campus Housing

On-campus housing provides students with a convenient residence solution and opportunities to enjoy campus life. Please see the Housing & Residential Services page for more information.

Complete Health Clearances

Please submit all complete mandatory health documents, including immunization records, to the Office of Student Affairs. This needs to be completed before you can register for orientation or courses. See the Safety and Well-being page for more information.

Sign Up for New Student Orientation

Orientation is designed for you to get familiar with life at Fei Tian and create connections with other students, faculty, staff, and other campus resources. At orientation, there will also be workshops for academic advising and course registration so that you can get started with taking the classes you need for completing your degree requirements. See the New Student Orientation on how to sign up.

International Students

If you are an international student, please visit the International Student Applicants section for instructions and assistance on applying for your student visa.

Get Ready to Enroll

Congratulations on your acceptance to Fei Tian College! We are excited to have you join us. Please follow the steps below to enroll.

Step 1: Sign Up for New Student Orientation

To prepare for a successful start at Fei Tian College, all new students are required to attend the New Student Orientation. During orientation, students will become familiar with campus resources and facilities, meet faculty and staff, and register for courses.

To register for the orientation, please contact the Office of Student Affairs at osa@feitian.edu.

Step 2: Complete Enrollment Documents

Download and fill out the following forms two weeks before the term starts. The forms must signed by the student or, if the student is under 18 years-old, the student’s legal guardians.

If you have not done so, please provide your official transcript or Diploma, or college transcript: The transcript must show your graduation date.

Step 3: Upload Enrollment Documents

If you have filled any PDF forms, please click the button below to upload them. (Store the files in a folder and compress the folder to Application-YourName-Date.zip, for example, Application-JoanSmith-20221010.zip.)

Upload

Step 4: Pay Enrollment Deposit

A $500 deposit will secure your spot at Fei Tian College. The deposit is non-refundable, and will be credited towards your tuition expenses. Please click the button below to pay:


4. Tuition and Fees

4.1 Tuition and General Fees

Student Financial Services is responsible for managing billing, collecting, refunding, and cashiering functions related to student accounts.

4.1.1 Undergraduate and Transfer Students

Academic Year 2022–23

Full-Time Undergraduate and Transfer Student Tuition and General Fee for 2022–23

Full Time (12 to 18 credits per semester) Annually Per Semester
Tuition $31,900 $15,950
General Fee $1,900 $950

Part-Time Undergraduate and Transfer Student Tuition and General Fee for 2022–23

Part Time (<12 credits per semester) Rate
Tuition $1,300 per credit
Summer Session I/II Courses $900 per credit
General Fee $590 per semester - 3/4 Time (9 to 11.5 credits)
$425 per semester - 1/2 Time (6 to 8.5 credits)
$210 per semester - <1/2 Time (up to 5 credits)
Academic Year 2023–24

Full-Time Undergraduate and Transfer Student Tuition and General Fee for 2023–24

Full Time (12 to 18 credits per semester) Annually Per Semester
Tuition $34,900 $17,450
General Fee $2,000 $1,000

Part-Time Undergraduate and Transfer Student Tuition and General Fee for 2023–24

Part Time (<12 credits per semester) Rate
Tuition $1,500 per credit
Summer Session I/II Courses $1,000 per credit
General Fee $600 per semester - 3/4 Time (9 to 11.5 credits)
$450 per semester - 1/2 Time (6 to 8.5 credits)
$220 per semester - <1/2 Time (up to 5 credits)

4.1.2 Graduate Students

Academic Year 2022–23

Graduate Student Tuition and General Fee for 2022–23

Tuition and Fee Rate
Tuition (Full-Time: 9 credits per semester) $1,300 per credit
Summer Session I/II Courses $900 per credit
General Fee $590 per semester - 3/4 Time (9 to 11.5 credits)
$425 per semester - 1/2 Time (6 to 8.5 credits)
$210 per semester - <1/2 Time (up to 5 credits)
Academic Year 2023–24

Graduate Student Tuition and General Fee for 2023–24

Tuition and Fee Rate
Tuition (Full-Time: 9 credits per semester) $1,500 per credit
Summer Session I/II Courses $1,000 per credit
General Fee $600 per semester - 3/4 Time (9 to 11.5 credits)
$450 per semester - 1/2 Time (6 to 8.5 credits)
$220 per semester - <1/2 Time (up to 5 credits)

4.1.3 What’s Covered by Tuition and Fees

Tuition covers:

  • Enrollment in any course applicable toward a student’s degree program.
  • For degree-seeking undergraduate students, a limit of 45 total credits per academic year (22.5 credits per semester).
  • For graduate students, a limit of 40 total credits per academic year (20 credits per semester).
  • For dance students, enrollment in the amount of private or class instruction required for the degree, and the use of dance studios and necessary equipment.
  • For music students, enrollment in the amount of private or class instruction required for the degree, and the use of music practice rooms and necessary equipment.

A student who wishes to register for more than the total allowable credits per academic year is subject to a charge of the per-credit rate for each additional credit.

General Fee covers:

  • Enrollment and registrar services: covers expenses associated with various administrative services, such as enrollment and degree certification, course drops and adds done before published deadlines, diplomas, official transcripts and their production, and maintenance of files.
  • Technology and lab services: covers expenses associated with maintaining servers, Internet access, and supplies for the computer and audio/video laboratories. It also covers fees associated with access to various studios.
  • Student activities and health services: covers expenses associated with student activities and services on campus.

4.2 Estimated Cost of Attendance

To assist students with financial planning, the following table lists other expenses a student is expected to incur per year.

The estimated annual cost of attendance (COA), including tuition and fees, living expenses, and other costs, is as follows. The actual total annual cost of attendance will vary depending on how many credits a student takes, and where and with whom a student lives. The costs listed are per year based on full-time studies for a student who lives near campus, where all figures are based on estimates.

Academic Year 2022–23

Estimated Annual Living and Other Expenses for 2022–23

Living independently Cost Living at home with family Cost
Tuition and General Fee $33,800 Tuition and General Fee $33,800
Mon-Fri Lunch Meal Plan $1,320 Mon-Fri Lunch Meal Plan $1,320
Other Estimated Expenses1 Other Estimated Expenses
Books and Supplies $900 Books and Supplies $900
Personal Expenses $1,100 Personal Expenses $1,100
Housing and Utilities $4,800 Housing and Utilities $1,500
Food $1,500 Food $1,125
Transportation $450 Transportation $900
Total Expenses $43,870 Total Expenses $40,645
Financial Aid2 ($14,000) Financial Aid ($14,000)
Total Estimated COA $29,870 Total Estimated COA $26,645
Academic Year 2023–24

Estimated Annual Living and Other Expenses for 2023–24

Living independently Cost Living at home with family Cost
Tuition and General Fee $36,900 Tuition and General Fee $36,900
Other Estimated Expenses1 Other Estimated Expenses
Books and Supplies $950 Books and Supplies $950
Personal Expenses $1,150 Personal Expenses $1,150
Housing and Utilities $5,950 Housing and Utilities $1,500
Food $4,500 Food $1,200
Transportation $450 Transportation $900
Total Expenses $49,900 Total Expenses $42,600
Financial Aid2 ($14,000) Financial Aid ($14,000)
Total Estimated COA $35,900 Total Estimated COA $28,600
Notes

1 Health Insurance: The cost of health insurance is not included in the above estimated COA. For inquiries on health insurance, please contact the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid.

2 Financial Aid: The estimated award is based on a student having received an Academic Scholarship. Students who additionally qualify for other financial aid may further subtract the award from the total estimated COA above.

4.3 Payment of the College Bill

All charges and credits from Fei Tian’s offices are aggregated in a student’s financial account and presented on the College bill.

The Office of Financial Services sends the College bill to students one month before the start of each semester. For accounts with a balance due, a second bill is sent one month after the start of the semester.

The tuition and fees are due and must be received by 5:00 p.m. the day before the new semester begins. They may be paid by mail or in person at the Office of Financial Services. Students receiving financial aid must apply the aid received to the unpaid balance at the time the financial aid is posted and no later than the due date.

Payment may be made by personal check, cashier’s check, money order, travelers' check, cash, or electronic funds transfer, or charged to a credit card for the exact amount due.

A monthly $30 late payment fee is applied for charges not paid by the deadline. A one-percent interest charge will be assessed monthly on all past-due accounts.

4.4 Tuition Refund Policy

Students who drop or withdraw from course(s) while in good standing may be eligible to receive a refund of tuition in accordance with the tuition refund schedules in Tables 3.1 and 3.2 . Fees are generally not refundable. Students dismissed from the College for disciplinary reasons or who are administratively withdrawn from the College are not eligible for a tuition refund.

The student must submit a completed Course Registration Add/Drop Form to the Office of the Registrar and request a tuition refund from the Office of Financial Services. The amount of the refund will depend on the date of the student’s official cancellation of course(s). The amount refundable plus any overpayment of fees or financial aid awards in excess of fees is presented on the College bill. Refunds are processed routinely throughout the semester.

Tuition Refund Schedule for Partial Cancellation of Course(s) (while remaining enrolled in at least one course)

Course(s) Canceled: Refundable Tuition:
During the first two weeks of classes 100% tuition refund
During the third or fourth week of classes 55% tuition refund
After the fourth week of classes No tuition refund

Tuition and Fee Refund Schedule for Withdrawal from the College

Official Withdrawal Date: Refundable Tuition and Fees:
By the day before the semester begins 100% tuition and fees refund
During the first week of classes 100% tuition refund
During the second week of classes 70% tuition refund
During the third or fourth week of classes 55% tuition refund
After the fourth week of classes No refund
Tuition Refund Appeal

Under special circumstances, such as medical needs or military service, FTC may be able to make an exception and refund tuition based on an appeal. The student must submit a written statement explaining the reason for the withdrawal and prepare supporting documentation (e.g., military activation orders). The College will make a decision on the appeal within 2 to 3 weeks.


5. Financial Aid

5.1 General Information

Fei Tian College offers need and merit-based institutional scholarships and aid to qualified and motivated students students.

Need-based grants are awarded on a competitive basis to students with demonstrated financial need, satisfactory academic progress, and moral standing. This grant can only be applied towards tuition.

Merit-based scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis to students with good academic standing, moral standing, extracurricular participation, and other merit indicators.

Applicants for the College’s Institutional Scholarship and Financial Aid must be currently enrolled or intending to apply as a full-time student. Degree-seeking part-time students who wish to apply can contact the Office of Student Financial Services (SFS).

Institutional Scholarships and Financial Aid are awarded on an annual basis and do not renew automatically unless otherwise specified. Applicants must submit an application and supporting documents for each academic year to be considered. Any Need-based aid the student is awarded will be reduced by the amount of the merit-based awards, if eligible.

Should a student discontinue a portion of that enrollment period, appropriate adjustments will be made to the student’s award in accordance with the refund and repayment policies of the College.

In the case a student’s eligibility for financial aid and scholarships changes, SFS will adjust the previously awarded amount. This may result in the immediate reversal of the award and may leave the student with an outstanding balance. Students must note that if their enrollment status changes between full-time and part-time, they will automatically forfeit all previously awarded aid and may be required to reapply for financial aid and scholarship.

5.2 Types of Financial Aid Available at the College

For 2022–2023, the College, through the Office of Financial Services, awards, in whole or in part, the following types of institutional financial aid to qualified students. Unless otherwise noted, all amounts given are on an annual basis, for a student enrolled in full-time study.

5.2.1 Community Awards

Hudson Valley Award

Students who meet one of the following criteria—at the time they apply for the College—receive a $2,000 scholarship which is given to 20 selected incoming first-year students each Academic Year. It is automatically renewable each year:

  • Have been living in the Hudson Valley for more than six months:
  • Proof of family’s homeownership or tenant-ship such as utility bills or rent receipts is required.
  • Or attends a secondary or post-secondary educational institution in the Hudson Valley region:
  • Proof of enrollment such as verification letters or official transcripts is required.

OR

Affiliated Schools Award

Students who are graduates of affiliated high schools at the time they apply for the College receive a $2,000 scholarship which is automatically renewable each academic year.

  • Proof of enrollment such as verification letters or official transcripts are required.

Interested students can check with the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid for the current list of affiliated high schools.

5.2.2 Merit-Based Academic Scholarship

First-Time Freshman

The academic scholarship for first-time freshman is awarded on a competitive basis to incoming students who demonstrate a record of excellence in their academic performance. Assessment criteria of the student include their high school GPA, and SAT/ACT scores if provided.

Transfer Students

The academic scholarship for transfer students is awarded to incoming transfer students who demonstrate a record of excellence in their academic performance. Assessment criteria of the student include their GPA, recommendation letters, and their personal statement.

Continuing Students

The academic scholarship for continuing students is awarded to students who demonstrate a continued record of excellence in their academic performance. Assessment criteria of the student as a whole include their annual cumulative GPA and satisfactory academic progress. At the end of each spring semester, Office of Student Financial Services will check the GPA of all scholarship recipients to ensure they have met their scholarship requirements.

2022–2023 and Prior

For students who entered prior to the 2022 academic year, under the following situation, the scholarship will be suspended: 1) For Honor, Scholar 1, the students fail to maintain a 3.0 GPA; 2) Scholar 2, Scholar 3, and Excel 1, the students fail to maintain a 2.8 GPA; 3) For Excel 2 and Excel 3, the students fail to maintain a 2.5 GPA; 4) the student has demonstrated any prohibited conduct please refer to the Code of Student Conduct.

5.2.3 Need-Based Grant: Lotus Grant

This is a non-repayable grant for students who demonstrate financial hardship. The Lotus Grant can only be applied towards tuition and is awarded on a competitive basis. The grant amount is determined by the level of demonstrated financial need and the availability of funds.

5.2.4 Department Awards

Due to the generous support of donors, students enrolled in the following programs may be eligible for additional awards:

  • BFA and MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
  • BM and MM in Performance
  • BFA in Stage Production and Design

Awards available through these departments are as follows (subject to change):

Description Details
Tuition and Fees Waiver Student does not pay tuition or fees for educational costs, including, but not limited to, costs associated with instruction received, academic and other student services, and institutional supports.
Room and Board Student receives free housing and meals on campus.
Supply Assistance College provides the student with the necessary academic and artistic supplies required for instruction (e.g., textbooks, dance clothing and equipment).
Transportation Assistance Student receives assistance to pay for the transportation expenses associated with participating in the program.
Full College Scholarship Total tuition and fees waiver, room and board, supplies assistance, and transportation assistance. Personal expenses are not covered.

5.2.5 Other Sources of Financial Aid

There may be other sources of financial aid from time to time. Interested students can contact the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid for more information.

5.3 Financial Aid Application Procedures

Scholarships are normally awarded on a yearly basis with the possibility of renewal. Outstanding students may be awarded multiyear scholarships. Except under extraordinary circumstances, only full-time students are eligible for the Full College Scholarship and Tuition and Fees Waiver.

A student seeking financial aid should complete FTC’s Financial Aid Application and submit it to the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid.

Decisions on admission and scholarships for new students are made at the same time.

In order to be eligible for a renewal of financial aid, continuing students must be in good standing at the College, which includes making satisfactory academic progress.

5.4 Standards for Financial Aid Recipients

Students receiving financial aid are expected to remain in good standing at the College. Failure to maintain good standing can result in sanctions, including but not limited to revocation of financial aid.

To remain eligible for financial aid, students must meet all three measures of satisfactory academic progress:

1. Cumulative GPA requirements:

Students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.

2. Minimum pace required to complete a degree within the maximum time frame:

Students are expected to enroll full-time, defined as 12 credits per semester, to maintain good academic standing. You are expected to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 10 credits if you are full-time, and 80% of credits attempted if enrolled part-time.

3. Maximum time frame for degree completion:

The maximum time frame for degree completion is 150% of the normal timeframe for the program. Students are eligible for 12 semesters of aid without taking into account transfer credits. If students have credits accepted for transfer or students enroll in summer, the maximum number of semesters of aid eligibility is prorated.

There is an academic progress review at the end of each semester. A financial aid recipient demonstrating unsatisfactory academic progress may be placed on academic probation for the next semester. During the probationary period, financial aid will still be available. But if the student fails to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress the next semester, the financial aid will be revoked.

After the revocation, the student may apply for financial aid if the student is able to meet the end-of-semester review standards for satisfactory academic progress in the following semester.

5.5 Return and Refund of Financial Aid

A student who receives financial aid and subsequently drops a course(s) may have his/her financial aid award adjusted pro rata to match tuition assessment. However, in the case of a student who receives a scholarship that requires full-time enrollment then drops below full-time status, the scholarship will be canceled for that semester. Any time a student withdraws from a course, scholarship eligibility could be in jeopardy.

If the student does not enroll in FTC or enrolls and then separates from the College, (s)he may be required to return any “unearned” portion of financial aid received. If the student receives federal, state, or private financial aid, (s)he must comply with that institution’s policies on financial aid refunds.

The resulting College bill may show a credit and/or charges in the student’s financial account. Before a refund can be issued, any existing credit must be applied toward the financial aid programs that administered financial aid.

Any student who receives a Fei Tian College Tuition and Fees waiver, or Room and Board coverage who separates from the College, will have their Tuition and Fees Waiver end the day after the official date of separation from the College, while their Room and Board coverage will end within 48 hours of the official date of separation from the College.

Non-attendance and/or failure to officially separate from the College may result in the cancellation of financial aid and all charges being billed to the student.

5.6 Federal Tax Credits for Educational Expenses

The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 created two non-refundable education tax credits, entitled the Hope Scholarship Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit. A non-refundable tax credit allows a taxpayer to subtract from the total amount of taxes owed the value of the credit for which the individual is eligible. “Non-refundable” means that the individual must owe taxes in order to get the value of the credit.

Individuals must meet specific income and enrollment guidelines to be eligible. Students should consult the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 or the Internal Revenue Service for details.


6. Registration and Records

6.1 Student Records

The Office of the Registrar collects and maintains information about prospective, current, and former students in its operations. The College respects the confidentiality of student information in the spirit of the Federal law and honors the rights of students to inspect and review their non-privileged education records, request amendment of inaccurate or misleading data in their education records, and grant or withhold consent to disclosure of their education records to third parties to the extent permitted by law.

6.2 Alumni Records

The Office of the Registrar maintains summary participation records for all alumni, including admissions rosters, dates of enrollment, and graduation rosters, in accordance with the College record and information management policy.

6.3 Enrollment & Registration

Enrollment

Enrollment is the completion of the registration process and affords the full privileges of student status. Enrollment is accomplished by payment or other satisfaction of tuition and fees and by the satisfaction of other obligations to the College, including the student enrollment agreement and documentation proving identity and status.

Continuous enrollment is generally required for the degree programs at FTC, unless a leave of absence has been authorized. Failure to maintain enrollment or obtain an official leave of absence is considered evidence that the student has withdrawn from the College.

Student enrollment services are handled primarily by the Office of the Registrar.

Registration

Enrolled students will meet with their academic advisor to discuss their course selection plans. Then they can register their courses at the Office of the Registrar. Those with outstanding charges in their account need to pay the college bill for their registration to be processed.

6.4 Course Add/Drop

Students wishing to make a change to their course schedule may generally add courses, drop courses, and/or change course grading options during the first two weeks of the semester. Such changes normally do not require any special permissions or fee payment, but are subject to the limitations of space availability in the course(s) and, if applicable, course load requirements for maintaining legal status in the U.S.

In order to drop a course after the second week but before the thirteenth week of classes, the student must consult the academic advisor to request the withdrawal. The student must also submit a completed Add/Drop Form, including the signatures of the instructor and academic advisor, to the Office of the Registrar for processing. Dropping a course after the fourth week of classes results in a “W” (Withdrawal) grade. “W” grades do not factor into a student’s grade point average.

To submit a request to Add/Drop a course, please use this form: Add/Drop Form.

Tuition Refund Policy

Students who drop or withdraw from course(s) while in good standing may be eligible to receive a refund of tuition in accordance with the tuition refund schedules in Tables 3.1 and 3.2 . Fees are generally not refundable. Students dismissed from the College for disciplinary reasons or who are administratively withdrawn from the College are not eligible for a tuition refund.

The student must submit a completed Course Registration Add/Drop Form to the Office of the Registrar and request a tuition refund from the Office of Financial Services. The amount of the refund will depend on the date of the student’s official cancellation of course(s). The amount refundable plus any overpayment of fees or financial aid awards in excess of fees is presented on the College bill. Refunds are processed routinely throughout the semester.

Tuition Refund Schedule for Partial Cancellation of Course(s) (while remaining enrolled in at least one course)

Course(s) Canceled: Refundable Tuition:
During the first two weeks of classes 100% tuition refund
During the third or fourth week of classes 55% tuition refund
After the fourth week of classes No tuition refund

Tuition and Fee Refund Schedule for Withdrawal from the College

Official Withdrawal Date: Refundable Tuition and Fees:
By the day before the semester begins 100% tuition and fees refund
During the first week of classes 100% tuition refund
During the second week of classes 70% tuition refund
During the third or fourth week of classes 55% tuition refund
After the fourth week of classes No refund
Tuition Refund Appeal

Under special circumstances, such as medical needs or military service, FTC may be able to make an exception and refund tuition based on an appeal. The student must submit a written statement explaining the reason for the withdrawal and prepare supporting documentation (e.g., military activation orders). The College will make a decision on the appeal within 2 to 3 weeks.

6.5 Credit for Prior Learning

Fei Tian offers matriculated students the opportunity to receive academic credit for documented prior college-level learning acquired through previous study or through non-classroom experiences.

Prior learning may include, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Credit transfer from another institution
  • Credit by examination
  • Credit by portfolio evaluation

The awarding of prior learning credit is conditioned on the following:

  • The student must be matriculated at Fei Tian College.
  • Prior learning must not duplicate or overlap previous coursework, or diminish the rigor of the program.
  • Credit from prior learning is not included in calculating grade point average.
  • The total number of credits awarded for prior learning may not exceed 50 percent of the credits required for graduation.

The determination of credit for prior learning is ultimately made by the Registrar in consultation with the department Chairs.

For more information about credit for prior learning, see policies on credit for prior learning, or contact the Office of the Registrar.

6.6 Degree Audit

Students can request degree audits from the Office of the Registrar. A degree audit is an academic advisement tool to assist students with planning and tracking progress toward graduation. The degree audit compares a student’s academic record against the requirements for his or her degree. It includes courses the student has completed at Fei Tian, courses in progress, and transfer credits.

The degree audit is not an official transcript and cannot replace the need to meet regularly with an academic advisor.

The degree audit helps you:

  • Learn the degree requirements for your major and minor, if you have one. It lists the courses in your major as well as courses that fulfill the general education requirements and what you need in order to graduate.
  • Identify courses needed to complete your major and/or minor
  • See which courses you have taken that do not count towards your major
  • View the grades, transfer credits, and/or waivers applied to your transcript
  • Select the correct courses for the next semester or session
  • Confirm your grade-point average (GPA)

6.7 Application to Graduate

Fulfilling graduation requirements and formally applying to graduate is each student’s responsibility. Candidates for graduation must file an application to graduate with the Registrar Office in their penultimate semester of study. To ensure that all program requirements will be met, students should review their degree audit and make an appointment with their academic advisor at the Office of Academic Services.

6.8 Transcript and Proof of Enrollment

Current and former students may request academic transcripts, enrollment verification letters, and/or early grade letters (if available) from the Office of the Registrar. Transcripts that include the current semester’s grades are normally processed only after the semester is finished. Enrollment verification requests made during the semester are normally processed after the Course Withdrawal Period. Early grade letters are available only when the Office of the Registrar has received the student’s grades but has not yet posted them to the transcript.

Every full-time Fei Tian College student is eligible for two free requests per semester for transcripts, verification letters, and/or early grade letters. Each subsequent request carries a fee of $10.00. Payment in the form of cash, personal check, or money order must be made prior to processing documents. If a transcript or letter is to be sent to more than one address, a separate request must be made for each.

For requests placed by mail or fax, the requester must provide a copy of valid government-issued photo identification showing the bearer’s signature. Cash should not be sent through the mail; the required payment should be made in the form of a personal check or money order.

Regular processing normally takes five to seven business days for a transcript or verification letter to be available for pickup in person or mailed by the Office of the Registrar. Expedited processing is available for an additional fee of $20.00 per document that is to be picked up by the requesting student in person. When a request requires express postal delivery, the requester is responsible for the cost of the specific postal services requested.

Delivery time is beyond the College’s control, so students should factor in delivery time when placing a request.

Transcripts will not be issued before all financial obligations have been cleared.

To submit a request for a transcript, please use this form: Transcript Request Form.

6.9 Withdrawals

A student’s withdrawal from the College is a permanent separation. Reasons why a student may withdraw from the College include to transfer to another institution or to leave the College without a definite plan to return.

A student who seeks to withdraw from the College in good standing must ordinarily complete an exit interview at the Office of Student Affairs and complete the exit procedures, which include submitting a completed Withdrawal Form to the Office of the Registrar for processing and promptly notifying all student services offices. For a withdrawal from the College that occurs before the fifth week of the semester, no courses or grades for that semester will appear on the student’s transcript. For a withdrawal that occurs in the fifth week of the semester or later, a final grade of “W” (Withdrawal) will be entered for all registered courses.

Administrative withdrawal is a College-initiated withdrawal that occurs when students, by the middle of a semester, have failed to attend class or have not registered for any courses, and have not been granted a leave of absence. In this case, a final grade of “F,” “NP,” or “IA” will be entered for all registered courses.

Tuition Refund Policy

Students who drop or withdraw from course(s) while in good standing may be eligible to receive a refund of tuition in accordance with the tuition refund schedules in Tables 3.1 and 3.2 . Fees are generally not refundable. Students dismissed from the College for disciplinary reasons or who are administratively withdrawn from the College are not eligible for a tuition refund.

The student must submit a completed Course Registration Add/Drop Form to the Office of the Registrar and request a tuition refund from the Office of Financial Services. The amount of the refund will depend on the date of the student’s official cancellation of course(s). The amount refundable plus any overpayment of fees or financial aid awards in excess of fees is presented on the College bill. Refunds are processed routinely throughout the semester.

Tuition Refund Schedule for Partial Cancellation of Course(s) (while remaining enrolled in at least one course)

Course(s) Canceled: Refundable Tuition:
During the first two weeks of classes 100% tuition refund
During the third or fourth week of classes 55% tuition refund
After the fourth week of classes No tuition refund

Tuition and Fee Refund Schedule for Withdrawal from the College

Official Withdrawal Date: Refundable Tuition and Fees:
By the day before the semester begins 100% tuition and fees refund
During the first week of classes 100% tuition refund
During the second week of classes 70% tuition refund
During the third or fourth week of classes 55% tuition refund
After the fourth week of classes No refund
Tuition Refund Appeal

Under special circumstances, such as medical needs or military service, FTC may be able to make an exception and refund tuition based on an appeal. The student must submit a written statement explaining the reason for the withdrawal and prepare supporting documentation (e.g., military activation orders). The College will make a decision on the appeal within 2 to 3 weeks.


7. Academic Services and Support

From figuring out what courses to take each semester to getting help with research papers, students can find a variety of academic support services to help them make the most of their learning opportunities at Fei Tian College.

7.1 Undergraduate Academic Advising

Academic advising is critical to student success. At Fei Tian College, we consider advising to be an integral part of teaching and believe an effective advisor will help their advisees become better students.

Scope of Advising

An advisor and the student shall meet at least once per term prior to registration. The advisor will receive copies of all official correspondence concerning the student’s academic standing from the Office of the Registrar. The academic advisor must approve the courses for which the student registers.

In general, advisors are responsible for providing the following advising services:

General Academic Advising
  • General education requirements
  • Class registration
  • Class add/drop/withdrawal
  • Major exploration (when feasible, help students select the major that suits their background and interests)
  • College transfer
  • Graduation requirements and planning
  • General academic policies and procedures
  • Probation and suspension
  • Academic petitions

The Office of Academic Services provides additional materials on advising procedures and policies to help advisors.   

Academic Advising for “At-Risk” Students

The Office of Academic Services works closely with instructors and monitors the performance of each student. When observing signs of a student being “at-risk,” the instructor should fill out the “Academic At-Risk” form and discuss with the office the appropriate action to take, be it giving a warning, recommending proper support services, or counseling.   

Advisor Assignment

Each newly-enrolled student is assigned an academic advisor who is a faculty member at the College, either from LAS or his or her own department before registration. The academic advisor and the Office of Academic Services serve as the primary channel for academic advising and student support.

Specifically, the Office of Academic Services coordinates with faculty from LAS and academic departments to provide advising services for the first two years of a student’s education at the College. Starting in the student’s junior year, he/she will be assigned an advisor in the Department. The Office of Academic Services will work with the Department Chairs to select appropriate advisors and assist in transferring the student to his/her new advisor.

Students are assigned alphabetically and based on their major unless the student or advisor requests a change. Typically, each faculty advisor is assigned no more than 10 students at a time.

Advisor Change

Any student wishing to change advisors may do so. Students can speak with the Office of Academic Services directly alerting the Office of their preference. Reassignments may also be made due to faculty leave or shifts in duties.

7.2 Graduate Academic Advising

Each graduate student is expected to select a faculty advisor by the end of the first semester of graduate studies. The faculty advisor provides advising on graduate course selection and projects.

Students in the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Classical Chinese Dance program must select faculty advisors who specialize in subjects they wish to explore for their MFA Master’s Project. The MFA faculty advisor serves as the chair of the project committee and meets with the student regularly to ensure the student is making appropriate progress toward completion of the Master’s Project and Oral Defense.

Students in the Master of Music (MM) in Performance program with work with their faculty advisor on their Graduate Recital, including comprehensive program notes.

Faculty advisors have the right to decline an advisee request. The advisor may be changed upon the request of either the student or faculty. A change of faculty advisor may delay the student’s progress toward degree completion. If a student cannot secure a faculty advisor by the end of the first semester, a staff member from the Office of Graduate Studies will provide advising on course selection. If a student has still not secured a major advisor by the second year of studies, the Program Director in the student’s department will, by default, serve as the student’s faculty advisor.

7.3 Entrance and Placement Tests

The College offers to incoming students placement tests for two purposes: (1) to determine students' level of proficiency in specific subject areas in order to place them into the appropriate levels of courses; and (2) to determine what kind of remedial instruction, if any, a student may need in order to make the scheduled academic progress. The College’s placement tests are not used to award credit by examination.

Currently, the College offers placement tests in English, math, and Chinese.

English Testing

All incoming students must take an English placement test. The College uses LEXILE or Accuplacer Reading to determine reading comprehension skills and the WritePlacer to determine writing competency. Students are placed into remedial courses as follows:

Remedial Course LEXILE Accuplacer Reading Score WritePlacer Score
Not Required 1250+ 90+ 5+
Introduction to College English 1100+ 51–89 4
ESL Below 1100 Below 51 1–3

If a student’s Accuplacer Reading score and WritePlacer score correspond to different remedial course placements (e.g., WritePlacer score of 3 and Accuplacer score of 90), the student will be asked to do a retest on one or both tests. After the retest, the Office of Academic Services, in discussion with remedial course instructors, will compare the student’s scores from the original test and the retest and place the student into the appropriate English course.

Math Testing

Students who are required or interested in taking MAT105 Calculus I are required to take a math placement test to demonstrate their mathematical readiness for studying Calculus. The College uses the Accuplacer College Level Math test to determine students' mathematics proficiency. Students who score below 103 on the Accuplacer College Level Math are placed into a remedial course: Pre-Calculus.

Chinese Testing

Students who wish to register for Chinese language courses to fulfil general education world language requirements must take the Chinese Placement Test in order to determine the appropriate course level to take.

Students are given one of four Chinese placement tests based on a survey of their language backgrounds. The exams are graded by a committee of Chinese language faculty, and placement results are sent to the Office of Academic Services. The following table shows the course placement of students based on their test score results:

Chinese Test ScoringExam 0–40% 41%–60% 61%–74% 75% and above
Beginning Chinese Chinese Language and Cultural Studies I: Level 1 Chinese Language and Cultural Studies I: Level 1 Chinese Language and Cultural Studies II: Level 1 Retest in Elementary Chinese
Elementary Chinese Retest in Beginning Chinese Chinese Language and Cultural Studies I: Level 2 Chinese Language and Cultural Studies II: Level 2 Retest in Intermediate Chinese
Intermediate Chinese Retest in Elementary Chinese Chinese Language and Cultural Studies I: Level 3 Chinese Language and Cultural Studies II: Level 3 Retest in Advanced Chinese
Advanced Chinese Retest in Intermediate Chinese Chinese Language and Cultural Studies I: Level 4 Chinese Language and Cultural Studies II: Level 4 Interview with Chinese Instructor for further evaluation

7.4 Student Support Services

Students who are identified as needing assistance in writing, critical reading, study skills, computing, or quantitative reasoning are given appropriate assistance through services offered by the Office of Academic Services. Depending on student needs and preferences and office availability, students are given support in these areas through one or more of the following ways:

  • One-on-one assistance with Academic Services staff
  • One-on-one tutoring with a faculty or student tutor
  • Small workshop seminars organized through the Office of Academic Services
  • Self-study with appropriate resources
Workshops

The Office of Academic Services organizes regular workshops on the following topics:

  • Study skills
  • Subject-level tutoring classes in math, computing, chemistry, and statistics
  • Student-led study groups, in collaboration with registered academic student clubs, or the Office of Academic Services
  • Other workshops will be offered based on demand
Transfer Information

The Office of Academic Services provides assistance for students who wish to transfer to other colleges and/or universities. It is the students' responsibility to follow through on all necessary steps to confirm that the receiving institution is willing to transfer credit for courses taken at the College.

7.5 Career and Internship Services

The Office of Academic Services is the College’s central resource for information on career pathways, including graduate school and employment opportunities. Individual career counseling and programs on various career possibilities are offered to assist students with career information gathering, exploration, and decision-making processes. Career interest assessments are also available to identify specific career options.

The staff of Academic Services strives to ensure that all graduates will achieve or have access to broader potential career and professional development opportunities, a greater understanding of the world of work, and a fuller awareness of their personal attributes, values, interests, and skills and how they relate to career options.

Academic Services currently offers the following career services to enrolled students:

  • Job information services
  • Individual career consultations: to help students with job search, resume writing, making connections, and preparing for job interviews
  • Career mentor: for students who might benefit from having someone guide them through their career decisions
  • Career seminars and workshops
  • Internship and potential employer information
  • Advisement for practicum opportunities
  • Information related to career opportunities, job training, job trends, and so on
  • Alumni databases

7.6 Directed and Independent Study

Fei Tian College offers students the opportunity to study individually under the guidance of a supervising instructor through directed and independent study.

Directed study is designed to be a substitute for an established course that is not offered in the semester for which the student wishes to register. In directed study, an instructor closely supervises the student to achieve the same course objectives and cover essentially the same material as that of the regularly scheduled course. Courses taken for directed study will be notated as such on the student’s transcript, e.g., “LAS220A Calculus A (Directed Study)”.

Independent study is an extension of an established course. It allows the student to design and carry out an independent project or study on a topic that is not fully treated in the curriculum. Independent study will be recorded as such on the student’s transcript, e.g., “DAN350 Independent Study in Dance”.

In directed and independent study, the supervising instructor assumes responsibility for coordination of the course, evaluation of student work, and determination of a final grade for the course. All such courses must be taken for a letter grade, and cannot be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis.

Students interested in directed or independent study should consult early with the Office of Academic Services, well in advance of registration. Directed and independent study require substantial planning as well as approvals and availability of appropriate instructors for the intended subject of study. For these reasons, they may not be available to students every semester.

Eligibility for Directed Study

Eligibility for directed study is dependent on having completed any and all prerequisites for the course and, in the case of an elective course, having maintained the requisite cumulative GPA for the degree (at least 2.0 for undergraduate degrees, at least 3.0 for graduate degrees); the GPA requirement is waived if the course is required for the degree (e.g., DAN453 Independent Study in Dance Production).

Course Proposals for Independent Study

Independent study requires a course outline developed by the student in consultation with an appropriate instructor who is willing to supervise the student’s work. Completed course proposals must be submitted to the Office of Academic Services for review in the semester before the intended study takes place. Approval by the appropriate department Chair and the academic advisor is required. Approved outlines will serve as the official course description.

Credit Award Guidelines
  • A directed or independent study course ordinarily carries one to four credits, with a maximum of six credits. One credit requires approximately 30–40 hours of study.
  • No more than two independent study courses and one directed study course can be taken in a single semester.
  • A maximum of 18 credits in directed and/or independent study may be counted toward a student’s requirements for graduation.

8. Student Life and Activities

8.1 New Student Orientation

Welcome to Fei Tian College!

To prepare for a successful start at Fei Tian College, all new students are required to attend the New Student Orientation. During orientation, students will become familiar with campus resources and facilities, meet faculty and staff, and register for courses.

To register for orientation, please contact the Office of Student Affairs at osa [@] feitian.edu.

8.2 Housing and Residential Services

The Office of Student Affairs provides assistance to students searching for on-campus or nearby off-campus residences. Staff are available to give students general information on residential services and the rental process, and can direct students to community postings that list available housing in the area. Students seeking on-campus housing must make a request to Student Affairs, and allocations will be made on a first-come first-served basis.

8.3 Student Dining

Students who select a campus meal plan will find a daily menu that offers a delicious variety of Asian and Western cuisines. The cafeteria prides itself on bringing fresh, healthy, and delicious food to our students, faculty, and staff through:

  • Hiring of our own staff and managing the entire process from procurement, storage, and preparing and cooking of the food;
  • Minimal use of processed foods;
  • Welcoming feedback to improve its services.
Cafeteria Dining Hours:
Day Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Mondays to Fridays 7:10am to 7:40am 11:30am to 1:05pm 5:45pm to 6:25pm
Saturdays No Breakfast 11:30am to 12:20pm 5:10pm to 5:35pm
Sundays and Holidays No Breakfast 11:00am to 12:20pm 5:10pm to 5:35pm

8.4 Safety and Well-being

Public Safety Programs

A suite of public safety programs is provided by the Office of Facility Operations in collaboration with the Office of Student Affairs. These programs include security patrol, escort, transportation, and identification and access services to maintain a safe and secure campus environment that is conducive to learning, working, living, and visiting. A trained staff focuses on crime prevention and investigation, safety education, emergency preparedness, and response and recovery. Safety education awareness programs are conducted for students throughout the academic year.

Student Insurance and Accident Reports

The Office of Student Affairs provides consultations for students in need of insurance and can assist students in purchasing a student insurance plan. Dance students are required to have health insurance.

Accident insurance is provided for all students while involved in College-related activities. Injuries that result from College-related activities must be reported to the faculty or staff member in charge and to the Office of Facility Operations within 24 hours of the time of injury.

Immunization and Health Services

The College requires all students to provide proof of immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella in order to enroll. Students who provide (1) a certificate from a physician stating that in the opinion of the physician such immunization is medically contraindicated; (2) a written statement that such immunization would be contrary to the student’s religious or spiritual beliefs; or (3) a laboratory or medical report documenting immunity will be deemed to have satisfied this requirement.

The Office of Student Affairs provides health education to students, staff, and faculty through publications, information sessions, and counseling.

Student Affairs also maintains information on the nearest hospitals and other medical facilities. In the event of a medical emergency, students are directed to the nearest hospital emergency room or to call 9–1–1 for an ambulance.

Disability Support Services

In the spirit of the federal and state disabilities laws, Fei Tian College provides disability consultation and coordinates reasonable special accommodations for qualified individuals with disabilities, including temporary disabilities due to injury. Disability support services are requested through the Office of Student Affairs and determined individually based on the disability condition, and may include academic, programmatic, and other special accommodations as well as counseling.

Disability support services may include:

  • academic accommodations, including: providing taped classes; converting documents to accessible formats (e.g., scanned books); providing temporary online courses where feasible; providing extended time on assignments and tests;
  • programmatic accommodations, including: priority registration for courses; reduced course load; and providing recommendations and facilitating access to the campus; and
  • other accommodations, including: dietary accommodations for meals or meal plans.
Wellness and Support Services

College students may encounter a variety of challenges including separation from family and friends, the transition to adulthood, developing new relationships, and defining and committing themselves to a career path. At the same time, they continue to deepen their understanding of themselves and of life.

The Office of Student Affairs offers services to support students' emotional and spiritual well-being. Staff help students talk through their life situations through individual counseling and small group sharing sessions. They can offer advice with the goals of helping students develop a positive mindset, think of the big picture, learn and grow from life lessons and let go of past shortcomings. They can also help develop coping activities that students can perform to handle stress and develop resilience to improve their situation and make their goals attainable.

Staff can also make off-campus referrals for students to community providers of specialized health and wellness services when they believe a student needs additional support.

8.5 Student Activities

A college education means more than earning degree credits. It represents the total experience of the student, both inside and outside the classroom. Student organizations and activities enrich that experience by providing students a means to sample and explore different interests and opportunities, often leading to greater personal and professional growth.

College-sponsored activities are offered free of charge and are open to the campus community. Involvement in campus activities can supplement and strengthen the educational experience, aid in skills development, and help forge lifelong friendships.

Students have numerous opportunities to engage in extracurricular activities and student clubs, which complement their programs. Ample campus spaces are dedicated to athletic, recreational, and leisure activities.

All student organizations are responsible for knowing and abiding by College policies and the law.


9. International Student Services

Fei Tian College is authorized under U.S. Federal law to enroll eligible nonimmigrant students under the F-1 nonimmigrant visa classification for its undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The Office of International Services is the primary resource for F-1 international students seeking advice on matters related to their F-1 status, including visas, passports, I-20s, and more. Each F-1 student is responsible for complying with F-1 regulations and consulting the Office of International Services when matters that may affect the student’s status arise.

9.1 Application and Entrance Procedure

International applicants follow the regular admissions procedure. As a special consideration, however, the College may grant international dance and music applicants permission to send samples or videos of their performances in lieu of a live audition.

Upon being admitted to the College, international students will receive in their admissions package important travel and F-1 information and an I-20 application form. If a student decides to enroll in Fei Tian under the F-1 visa classification, the student must submit to the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid a completed I-20 application and required supporting documentation, along with a completed Intent to Enroll Form.

Upon review by the Office of International Services, the College will create an initial Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) record and issue a I-20 Form to the student.

It is the student’s responsibility to sign the I-20 Form and keep it safe, pay the required I-901 SEVIS fee (refer to www.ice.gov/sevis for detailed information), and obtain an F-1 student visa (see Applying for an F-1 Student Visa) if the student is not currently studying in the U.S. with an active F-1, or unless he or she is from a visa-exempt country (i.e., Canada or Bermuda).

After entering the United States, all international students must report to the Office of International Services within 30 days of the program start date listed on the I-20 Form to validate their intended participation at the College. Failure to do so may invalidate a student’s legal status in the U.S.

International students are required to keep all versions of their I-20 Form and their passport, visa (or I-94 for Canadian/Bermudan citizens), and other official documents in a safe and accessible place and pay attention to their respective expiration dates.

9.2 Applying for an F-1 Student Visa

The following categories of students must obtain an F-1 student visa issued by the Department of State at a local U.S. consulate or embassy:

  • International students outside the U.S. who are not citizens of a visa-exempt country
  • International students in the U.S. but not in a legal status that allows them to study, except those from a visa-exempt country

Students must complete the online DS-160 visa application (https://ceac.state.gov/genniv) and schedule an appointment for a visa interview. The following documentation must be brought to the interview:

  • I-20 Form from Fei Tian College, and any old I-20s
  • Printed confirmation page from the Form DS-160 “Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application”
  • Passport valid for at least six months after the student plans to enter the United States
  • Recent passport-style photograph, two inches by two inches
  • Receipt for the I-901 SEVIS fee payment
  • Receipt for the visa application fee payment
  • Evidence of sufficient funds to cover tuition and living expenses for at least the first year of study
  • Admission letter from Fei Tian College
  • Fei Tian College Catalog
  • Official transcripts and diplomas from previous study

Students from visa-exempt countries need not apply for visas at their local U.S. consulates, and should instead bring the relevant documents to the U.S. port of entry and apply for F-1 nonimmigrant student status upon entering the United States.

9.3 Transferring to Fei Tian

F-1 students currently studying at another U.S. institution (including high school) who intend to begin full-time studies at Fei Tian College must pre-arrange to have their SEVIS records transferred to Fei Tian College. In addition to the normal international admissions and entrance procedure, such students must submit a completed F-1 SEVIS Record Transfer Request Form with the completed I-20 application and required supporting documentation in order for their SEVIS records to be transferred to Fei Tian College. Contact the Office of International Services for detailed instructions.

9.4 Maintaining Status

Maintaining F-1 status means maintaining compliance with the law. Each F-1 international student bears ultimate responsibility for maintaining status, from initial entry to the United States in F-1 status until final departure. The Office of International Services can advise and assist students, but only if students follow the regulations and request assistance in a timely manner. For detailed information about studying in the United States as an F-1 international student, visit StudyInTheStates.dhs.gov. F-1 students must comply with the following requirements in order to maintain lawful status:

  • Report to the Office of International Services within 30 days of the program start date that appears on the I-20 Form.
  • Be registered full-time for at least two semesters each year (except in cases of authorized Reduced Course Loads). Failure to maintain the requisite course load could result in severe consequences.
  • Follow transfer procedures if applicable.
  • Obtain a new I-20 Form for a change in educational level of study.
  • Abide by the F-1 grace period regulations (see below).
  • Report any change of personal or employment information to the Office of International Services within 10 days of the change.
  • Maintain a valid passport.
  • Refrain from engaging in unauthorized employment.
  • Make satisfactory progress in a program of study.
  • Apply for a timely extension of studies if applicable.
  • Depart the United States, transfer programs, or change status in a timely manner.
Grace Period

A student who has completed a program and any authorized post-completion optional practical training has 60 days to depart the United States, transfer programs, or file for a change of status. A student who has been authorized for withdrawal from the College by the Office of International Services has 15 days to depart the United States. A student who is terminated or who withdraws from a program without authorization by the Office of International Services is not granted a grace period and must immediately depart the United States.

Dropping Below Full-Time Studies

F-1 students must obtain prior authorization from the Office of International Services before undertaking to drop below a full-time course load. Failure to obtain such authorization is a violation of the Federal F-1 regulations and will result in the immediate loss of F-1 status and possibly other sanctions.

9.5 Leave-Taking and Travel

Any F-1 student who intends to take a temporary leave of absence or travel abroad during a semester in which he or she is registered must notify and consult the Office of International Services ahead of time.

If the leave will be longer than five months, the student should consult staff at the Office of International Services at least 15 days prior to departure. The student’s SEVIS record will be terminated and the I-20 Form rendered invalid. Two months prior to returning to the College, the student must contact the Office of International Services and complete the procedures to return for studies in F-1 status.

Before traveling abroad, F-1 students should check the expiration dates on their passport and visa and obtain a new travel endorsement on the I-20 Form from the International Student Advisor or Designated School Official (DSO), if needed. If the visa is expired or will expire while the student is abroad, he or she may need to renew it while abroad in order to re-enter the U.S. in F-1 status.

Coursework Outside the United States

Students who wish to remain outside the United States for an extended period of time for activities related to their programs may qualify to retain F-1 status but must maintain full-time registration during two semesters of the year. Consult the Office of International Services for details.

9.6 Failure to Maintain Status

Examples of failure to maintain status include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Dropping below full-time studies without proper authorization.
  • Attending a school other than the one a student is authorized to attend.
  • Failure to apply for a timely I-20 extension, SEVIS record transfer, or change in level of education.
  • Engaging in unauthorized employment.
  • Failure to notify the DSO before travel abroad, leave of absence, or withdrawal.
  • Failure to report within 10 days a change to any of the following: official name, mailing address in the U.S., permanent address in the home country, email address, phone number, program, legal status.

The College is required to manage all F-1 student records in SEVIS each semester. Students who fail to maintain lawful status will lose the privileges of their student status and become subject to deportation and possibly other sanctions.

9.7 International Student Employment

Employment eligibility and options for F-1 students are limited by Federal F-1 regulations and are available only to students who have maintained lawful status and are in good standing.

Prior to beginning employment, such students are required to obtain the prior written authorization of the Office of International Services and/or the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Failure to obtain proper authorization constitutes a serious violation of U.S. immigration regulations.


10. Student Rights and Responsibilities

With the responsibilities for acceptable conduct that the Code of Student Conduct places on students of the College, come attendant basic rights and institutional obligations.

The College recognizes its obligation to support and uphold the basic freedoms and citizenship rights of all students and to provide conditions conducive to learning and reflective of the institution’s founding values of Truthfulness, Compassion, and Tolerance. Within this context, students have the following basic rights.

10.1 Student Rights and Institutional Obligations

10.1.1 Rights in the Pursuit of Education

The classrooms, laboratories, libraries, and studios constitute the essential learning environments of the College, and the freedom to learn in these environments should be promoted and encouraged by instructors. In support of a student’s rights in the classroom or other learning environments, the College grants students the right to:

  • Have access to faculty, technology, classrooms, libraries, presentations, and other resources necessary for the learning process;
  • Have access to academic advising and clear expectations for degree and graduation requirements;
  • Participate in an exchange of ideas that is free of conduct that impedes either an instructor’s ability to teach or a student’s ability to learn;
  • Receive a class syllabus in a timely manner;
  • Expect to interact with faculty who act professionally, provide clearly stated course goals, provide clear expectations for class performance and evaluation, hold classes as scheduled, are accessible for consultation, and maintain a clear connection between course content and the most recently approved course description; and
  • Have the freedom to raise relevant issues pertaining to classroom discussion, offer reasonable doubts about information presented, and express alternative opinions without concern for any academic penalty.

10.1.2 Right to Freedom from Harassment

Fei Tian College is committed to maintaining an environment of learning and working that is free of prejudice and harassment—an environment that supports, nurtures, and rewards career and educational advancement on the basis of ability and performance.

Harassment based upon race, sex, color, religion, age, national origin, ethnicity, disability, veteran or military status, marital status, citizenship status, or any other legally protected basis is prohibited by law and undermines the character and purpose of the College. Such harassment is illegal and against College policy and will not be tolerated. This policy covers all members of the College community and those who affect the College community, such as vendors and visitors.

10.1.3 Right to Freedom from Discrimination

Fei Tian College admits students of any race, color, national origin, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the College. In the letter and spirit of applicable laws, it does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, ethnic origin, or any other applicable legally protected status in the administration of its educational programs. In accordance with this policy and as delineated by federal and state law, the College is committed to basing judgments concerning the admission and education of individuals upon their qualifications and abilities.

10.1.4 Right to Contribute to College Governance

Students have the right to contribute to the making of institutional policies generally affecting their social or academic affairs.

10.1.5 Rights to Access Records and Facilities and of Privacy

Students can expect to have access to policies and procedures that affect them and have access to College offices that may be able to assist them.

Students can expect that their education records will be maintained confidentially and they will have access to their records in a manner consistent with College policies and applicable state and federal laws. Students can expect to have reasonable access to College facilities and resources.

10.1.6 Right to Accommodation for Individuals with Disabilities

Students may request special accommodations for disabilities, including for temporary disabilities due to injury, through the Office of Student Affairs.

10.1.7 Rights to Pursue Grievances and to Just Processes in Cases of Discipline

Students who believe that any of their rights have been violated by a member of the College community have the right to file a report of misconduct under the Code of Student Conduct or a grievance petition under the student academic complaint process.

Students involved should expect that they will be given notice and an opportunity to respond and that the College will make a good-faith review of the allegation(s) in order to bring about a fair and reasonable resolution of the matter.

10.2 Code of Student Conduct

10.2.1 Purpose, Authority, Application

1. Purpose

As members of the College community and greater society, students have basic rights and responsibilities. These regulations set forth the College’s expectations for student conduct and procedures governing student discipline. The College intends that this Code of Student Conduct help students to proactively build relationships and community on the foundation of virtue and traditional culture, in accordance with the College’s mission and values.

2. Authority

These regulations are established pursuant to the authority delegated to the President by the Board of Trustees for the establishment of a Code of Student Conduct. Ultimate authority over student conduct and discipline is vested in the President, who has discretion to take immediate and final action for any violation of College policies. Such authority may be delegated as set forth in this Code or in other appropriate policies adopted by the President.

As members of an academic community and the greater society, students may be accountable both to the College and to civil and criminal authorities for acts that constitute violations of both this Code and the law. Conduct proceedings at the College may proceed independently of and during the pendency of external proceedings.

3. Application and Scope

These regulations apply to all students and student groups at the College, unless in special circumstances the President directs otherwise. They apply to conduct that occurs on College property, at College sponsored activities, and to off-campus conduct that adversely affects the College community and/or the pursuit of its objectives. The President shall decide on a case-by-case basis whether the Code shall be applied to conduct that occurs off campus.

The adoption of this Code does not prohibit individual campuses from developing campus-wide policies when unique campus factors necessitate modification of this Code and the campus policies would not be inconsistent with or less restrictive than this Code.

Any case involving an allegation of sexual misconduct shall proceed according to the specific requirements set forth in the Article 129-B Policies in addition to the general requirements of this Code.

4. Amendments

Any amendments to this Code shall remain in effect until rescinded or modified by the President. Amendments may be proposed at any time by faculty, staff, or the Board of Trustees. The President shall conduct a review of this Code every two years for the purpose of identifying any necessary updates resulting from changes in applicable law or College policy.

5. Definitions

“Campus” shall mean all College grounds, structures, and other property owned, controlled, supervised, used, or occupied by the College, and adjacent streets and sidewalks.

“Code of Student Conduct” shall mean the Honor Code, the standards for student conduct, and the student disciplinary process.

“College” shall mean Fei Tian College and includes all campuses.

“Informal action” shall mean an action designed to educate students about the behavioral standards expected of them as members of the College community and to hold them accountable for inappropriate conduct.

“Members of the College community” shall mean faculty and staff, students, trustees, and officers of the College.

“Student” shall mean an individual for whom the College maintains student records and who: (a) is taking courses at the College or enrolled in a College program; (b) is participating as a student in College activities prior to the start of classes; (c) is on an approved leave; (d) is not otherwise presently enrolled or registered for a particular session but has a continuing relationship with the College; (e) withdraws, transfers, or graduates after an alleged violation of the Code; or (f) already graduated when the conduct at issue implicates the student’s College degree.

10.2.2 Student Conduct

1. Honor Code

The Honor Code is a principle-based code that reflects the moral ideals and standards of the institution. By being admitted or continuing enrollment, each student personally commits to observe these Honor Code standards:

  • Act honestly.
  • Cherish virtue.
  • Respect others.
  • Obey the law and comply with College policies and campus regulations.
  • Cultivate a noble and responsible character.
  • Encourage others in their commitment to abide by the Honor Code.
2. General

Students and, to the extent applicable, student groups are expected and required to obey the law, to comply with College policies, with campus rules and regulations, with directives issued by College officials, and to observe the standards of conduct appropriate for an institution of higher learning. Students are expected to make choices that preserve a safe environment, to respect the rights of others, to practice responsible citizenship, and to be accountable for their own actions and the conduct of their guests. A student who violates these general standards of conduct may be subject to disciplinary action.

3. Dress and Grooming Standards

The dress and grooming of students should be modest, neat, and clean. Clothing is inappropriate when it is revealing, sleeveless, strapless, short (skirt and pants length should be knee-length or longer), excessively form-fitting, or unnaturally ripped or faded. In addition, logos or symbols that promote inappropriate messages should not be worn. Footwear should not have excessively high heels or expose the toes (unless in the residences). Heavy and dramatic makeup and unnatural-looking hair dyes should be avoided. Exposed tattoos and piercings or jewelry affixed to the nose, tongue, cheek, lip, or eyebrow are inappropriate.

4. Academic Integrity Policy

Integrity is a core value of the Fei Tian experience. Academic misconduct undermines the educational process and the sense of integrity that characterizes the College community. It is expected that all academic goals be achieved through honorable means. Specifically, students are expected to support and abide by the provisions of this Academic Integrity Policy, which prohibits: plagiarism; cheating on assignments or examinations; engaging in unauthorized collaboration on academic work; taking, acquiring, or using course materials without faculty permission; submitting falsified records of academic achievement; obtaining dishonestly grades, honors, or awards; altering, forging, or misusing a College academic record; or fabricating or falsifying data or data analysis. Suspected academic misconduct may be reported through the procedures set forth in this Code.

5. Prohibited Conduct

The following types of actions constitute misconduct that may result in disciplinary action. Where appropriate, failure to prevent one’s guests from committing these acts may be treated as violations of this Code:

  • Abuse of the Code of Student Conduct. Includes but is not limited to: making, or causing to be made, a false report of an alleged Code violation; failing to comply with a notice to appear for a disciplinary meeting; falsifying or misrepresenting information in the disciplinary process; disrupting or interfering with the disciplinary process; and failing to comply with the disciplinary sanction(s) imposed under this Code.
  • Academic Misconduct. Any conduct that violates academic integrity, including but not limited to: plagiarism; cheating on assignments or examinations; engaging in unauthorized collaboration on academic work; taking, acquiring, or using course materials without faculty permission; submitting falsified records of academic achievement; obtaining dishonestly grades, honors, or awards; altering, forging, or misusing a College academic record; or fabricating or falsifying data or data analysis.
  • Aiding, Abetting, Assisting, or Facilitating Misconduct. Any conduct that indicates active association with or that actively encourages another person or persons whose conduct is in violation of this Code.
  • Attempt to Injure or Defraud. Conduct involving making, forging, printing, reproducing, copying, or altering any record, document, writing, or identification used or maintained by the College when done with intent to injure, defraud, or misinform.
  • Attempting to Engage in an Act Prohibited by the Code. An “attempt” is defined as conduct that, if successful, would constitute or result in the prohibited conduct. Any student who abandons an attempt or prevents the prohibited conduct from occurring under circumstances that demonstrate a complete and voluntary renunciation of the prohibited conduct will not be subject to disciplinary action.
  • Damage or Misuse of Property. Any conduct that damages, destroys, tampers with, or misuses College property or property of others, including but not limited to: misusing, altering, or damaging fire safety equipment, safety devices, or other emergency equipment or interfering with the performance of those specifically charged to carry out emergency services; or acting to obtain fraudulently—through deceit, unauthorized procedures, or misrepresentation—goods, services, or funds from College units, student groups, or individuals acting on their behalf.
  • Discrimination. Any conduct that is violative of the College’s Non-discrimination Policy.
  • Disorderly Conduct or Hooliganism. Conduct intended and likely to incite a breach of the peace.
  • Dress and Grooming Standards Violation.
  • Falsification. Any conduct involving falsification, including but not limited to: willfully providing College offices or officials with false, misleading, or incomplete information; forging or altering without proper authorization official College records or documents or conspiring with or inducing others to forge or alter without proper authorization College records or documents; misusing, altering, forging, falsifying, or transferring to another person College-issued identification; or intentionally making a false report of an emergency to a College official or an emergency service agency.
  • Firearms, Dangerous Materials, or Prohibited Items. Conduct including the use, possession, or display of: firearms; other weapons and items that could be used as weapons; fireworks; or any other items prohibited by the College, such as drugs, tobacco, alcohol, associated paraphernalia, or media and games that are vulgar, immoral, violent, or pornographic.
  • Harassment, Hazing, Intimidation, or Aggression: Any intentional or careless conduct that endangers or threatens to endanger the physical and/or mental health, safety, or welfare of another person, including, but not limited to: threatening, harassing, intimidating, bullying, or assaulting behavior.
  • Intimacy and Romantic Behavior. Conduct inappropriately displaying physical intimacy or romance.
  • Negative Influence. Conduct at odds with the College’s mission and values and that exerts a negative influence on other(s), the campus environment, or a College activity.
  • Obstruction or Disruption. Any conduct that unreasonably obstructs, disrupts, or interferes with a teaching, educational, research, administrative, disciplinary, or other activity or service authorized to be conducted or offered on or off campus, including but not limited to: misconduct in the classroom or other College setting; any act that damages or interferes with a utility service or equipment, such as College computers, computer programs, computer records, or computer networks accessible through the College’s computer resources; or any action of a student that fails to comply with lawful directions of College officials acting in the performance of their duties.
  • Prohibited Computer or Electronic Activity. Conduct that includes: unauthorized entry into a file to use, read, change the contents, or other purpose; unauthorized transfer of a file; unauthorized use of another individual’s identification and password; use of a computer or other electronic device to unreasonably interfere with the work of another student, faculty member, or College official; use of a computer or other electronic device to send obscene messages; use of a computer or other electronic device to unreasonably interfere with the normal operation of the College’s network; or use of a computer or other electronic device in violation of copyright laws.
  • Sexual Misconduct. All forms of sexual misconduct, including but not limited to: sexual harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual exploitation, indecent exposure, and all non-consensual sexual contact or behavior.
  • Solicitation. Conduct that involves unauthorized solicitation, sale, or promotion of any goods or services on College property or at College-sponsored activities.
  • Theft or Unauthorized Possession. Conduct including theft, unauthorized possession of, or wrongful sale or gift of property.
  • Unauthorized Access or Use. Conduct involving accessing or using without authorization College property, services, or information systems, or obtaining or providing to another person the means of such unauthorized access or use, including, but not limited to, using or providing without authorization keys or access codes.
  • Violation of College Policies, Campus Rules and Regulations, or Official Directives.
  • Violation of Federal, State, or Local Law.
6. Sanctions

While the College intends that this Code be administered collegially to educate students, it also recognizes that there may be instances in which the nature and severity of the student’s behavior may warrant disciplinary sanctions up to and including expulsion. Types of sanctions that may be imposed in accordance with this Code of Student Conduct are as follows:

  • Warning. An oral warning to bring to the student’s attention a new or ongoing deficiency in conduct.
  • Probation. A status that puts the student on formal notice and may carry special terms to regain good standing. Requires a conduct proceeding and a review after the probationary period.
  • Suspension. A sanction that imposes an involuntary absence on the part of the student, and carries special terms to regain good standing. Requires a conduct proceeding and a review after the suspension period. Revocation of financial aid awards.
  • Dismissal. A sanction that completely removes the student from his or her program and separates the student from the College.
  • Expulsion. A sanction that results in permanent termination of student status, generally without grades.
  • Discretionary Sanctions. Other sanctions that bear reasonable relation to the violation for which the student has been sanctioned may be imposed instead of or in addition to other sanctions. E.g., restriction of student privileges, restitution, fines.

10.2.3 Procedures Governing Student Discipline

1. General

The student disciplinary process aims to assist the College and its students to preserve and enhance a learning environment conducive to achieving the aims of an FTC education and fulfilling the College’s mission. Where possible, the College intends that this process be administered to help educate students as to their moral responsibilities and aid them in developing their character. The College, at its discretion, may choose to investigate reported or suspected Code violations. Generally, the College shall follow the prescribed procedures. However, the institution reserves to each campus the right to, at its discretion, vary from them according to the circumstances of individual matters, so long as the student receives prior to the imposition of any sanctions, notice of the nature of the alleged or suspected violation(s) and an opportunity to respond.

No attempt will be made to apply formal or technical rules of evidence. In general, any information that is considered relevant will be received and reviewed, subject to the reasonable discretion of the Code administrator.

Any case involving an allegation of sexual misconduct shall proceed according to the requirements set forth in the Article 129-B Policies in addition to the general requirements of this Code.

2. Code Administrators/Disciplinary Managers

The student disciplinary process is under the direction of each campus’s chief academic officer (for academic matters) and Director of Student Affairs (for non-academic matters) (“Code administrators” or “Disciplinary managers”). If one incident involves both academic and non-academic issues, involves both undergraduate and graduate issues, involves more than one campus, and/or directly involves the Code administrator, the President or designee will decide which administrator(s) are to handle the matter.

3. Reporting Misconduct

Any person may report a suspected violation of this Code of Student Conduct to the Code administrator or other assigned appropriate personnel, who will review the reported allegation to determine the appropriate action to be taken from the following: Investigation. Begin an investigation into the matter if he or she determines that the allegation(s), if proven, could be considered a violation of the Code; Referral back for informal action. Refer the matter back to the Director of Student Affairs for the matter to be dealt with informally if the allegations do not constitute a violation of student conduct; or No action. Decide to take no further action with a written explanation of this decision. Reports should be made using the student incident report form, within a reasonable time of the alleged violation. Disciplinary action may be pursued if there is enough information available to substantiate the reported conduct. If information is discovered alleging that a past student of the College committed a Code violation at the time he or she was a student, a report shall be made to the responsible administrator, who shall determine the procedures to follow and the appropriate sanction.

4. Interim Actions

The President or designee shall have authority to take immediate and appropriate interim protective action when the alleged actions of a student jeopardize the well-being of that student or others or threaten the operations or safety of the College.

5. Investigations

Reports may be investigated if there is sufficient, reasonable, and credible information that a Code violation has occurred. The investigation may include interviewing the student and any witnesses or other persons having relevant information as the Code administrator deems appropriate. Following each investigation, the Code administrator will analyze the report and evidence. If it appears that the alleged violation(s) have not occurred, the Code administrator will drop the case and notify the student and, where appropriate, the reporting individual.

6. Notice

If it appears that the alleged violation(s) occurred, the Code administrator or designee will notify the student as to the nature of the alleged or suspected violation(s) and of the student’s opportunity to respond. Where appropriate, an attempt should be made to review the notice together with the student, discuss possible sanctions, and work with the student.

7. Conduct Proceeding

A student facing potential disciplinary sanctions other than an oral warning will be given a conduct proceeding in the form of a disciplinary meeting* with the Code administrator or a designated school agent. *Campuses may offer an alternative conduct proceeding in the form of a disciplinary hearing for complex cases. The purpose of the disciplinary meeting is to present the student with the evidence gathered and to provide him or her an opportunity to make representations. In limited circumstances (e.g., a risk of harm to the witness) a witness’s identity may be kept confidential unless to do so would prejudice the fairness of the proceedings. The following procedural guidelines apply to conduct proceedings: The student shall have an opportunity to respond to the information related to the alleged violation and may submit additional relevant information. If the student fails to appear at a disciplinary meeting, the matter may be adjudicated in absentia. The College participants will decide, on the basis of the evidence and the student’s representations, whether the allegation is proven. When there are significant discrepancies between the supporting information and the student’s response, the College will attempt to ascertain the truth and exercise reasonable discretion in assessing the credibility of the witnesses and strength of the evidence. If the allegation is considered to be proven, depending on the nature of the disciplinary offense, the Code administrator will ask the student to submit any additional evidence to decide on the appropriate sanction. The outcome of a conduct proceeding is to be determined based solely on the reasonable conclusion of the designated trier, and shall depend on the totality of all relevant factors, including but not limited to: the nature and severity of the transgression, the student’s attitude, and previous history. The Code administrator will prepare a decision and the outcome of the conduct proceeding shall be conveyed to the student. It is expected that most disciplinary cases will be resolved at this stage. The outcome of a conduct proceeding cannot serve as the basis for a grievance.

8. Appeal

Generally, the outcome of a conduct proceeding is a final decision. At least in proceedings that result in suspension, dismissal, expulsion, or revocation of financial aid, however, a case may be appealed to the appropriate reviewer (either the President or the Judicial Committee) under the following guidelines. Within five calendar days of the outcome of the conduct proceeding, the student must submit a letter of appeal to the reviewer. The appeal must specify grounds that would justify reconsideration. E.g. a significant procedural irregularity that changes the findings of fact of the proceeding; or new evidence that significantly alters the findings of fact. This appeal may not be made on the basis of general dissatisfaction with the decision of the trier. The reviewer will review the record and letter of appeal, and any other relevant information arising in the context of the appeal. The reviewer may also make independent inquiries to clarify statements in the record. After reviewing this information, the reviewer shall render a decision within no more than 45 calendar days of the filing of the appeal. The reviewer may, at the reviewer’s sole discretion, modify the sanction applied to the student based upon the appeal. Further, the reviewer may refer the matter back to the Code administrator for further evaluation with accompanying instructions if it is determined that the procedures followed were not appropriate or relevant information was not appropriately considered. The reviewer will deliver a decision to the student and to the Code administrator. Except in the case of a remand, the reviewer’s decision is final with no provision for further review. The decision on appeal cannot serve as the basis for a complaint.

9. Disciplinary Records

The College normally maintains a record of each proceeding that results in a sanction. Disciplinary records shall be maintained under the authority of the Code administrator, in accordance with the College’s record retention policy.

10.3 Resolution of Student Complaints

The College maintains a process for the good faith review and resolution of student complaints that is intended to: encourage informal resolution of alleged violations at the lowest unit level; allow for a formal resolution mechanism if not resolved informally; and provide for appeal to a final decision maker. The final decision following appeal is not appealable further within the College.

Scope

Student complaints are brought by students regarding the College’s provision of education and academic services affecting their role as students and must be based on a claimed violation of a College rule, policy, or established practice.

Complaints Not Covered

Complaints not covered by this policy include those regarding: disciplinary action under the Code of Student Conduct; or College admission decisions.

Exhaustion of Remedies

Exhaustion of all informal and formal internal processes at the College is a prerequisite to filing a complaint with an external agency pursuant to this policy. Discussion of the matter through informal means is the preferred starting point. Should that fail, the complainant should use the formal grievance resolution mechanisms provided at each campus. No retaliatory action shall be taken against a student for utilizing these processes.

Procedural Guidelines

There may be occasions when a student has a concern or a complaint about a course or an instructor, e.g., about a course requirement, class procedure, or grades. A concern about a course or instructor should be expressed no later than 30 days into the start of the next semester. The student should, whenever possible, first approach the instructor for clarification and resolution. Addressing a challenging situation at this level provides an opportunity for both the student and instructor to work together to find a mutual resolution in the spirit of understanding and patience. If, after contacting the instructor the student still has concerns, the student should address them to the appropriate department Chair who will work to help the student and instructor resolve the matter. Individual academic departments may establish their own internal procedures for handling student concerns. The informal complaint resolution process is expected to be completed within one month.

If the informal resolution process is not able to resolve the concern, the student may file a formal grievance by the end of the semester following the semester in which the alleged grievance occurred, or as soon as is reasonably possible.

A student files a grievance by submitting a complaint in writing to the campus Provost (for a grievance of an academic nature) or the Director of Student Affairs or designee (for a grievance of a non-academic nature). The statement should include: (1) a complete narrative of the circumstances giving rise to the grievance; (2) identification of the parties involved; (3) a statement of the desired remedy; and (4) any supporting documentation.

The Provost or the Director of Student Affairs will determine whether the complaint has sufficient substance to be deemed a grievance. If so, the student will be notified and the grievance will be routed to the appropriate committee for a preliminary investigation and hearing with the aggrieved student. An academic grievance will be routed to the Academic Standards and Student Services Committee, whereas a non-academic grievance will be routed to the Judicial Committee.

Information from any source and in any manner determined to be useful in reaching a recommendation may be used. The committee will present a final report and recommendation to the Provost or the Director of Student Affairs. The student shall also be notified of the recommendation.

Should the recommendation not be acceptable to the student, the case may be appealed to the College President. The President’s decision is final within the College appeal process and cannot serve as the basis for a new complaint.

Since students are encouraged to use the College grievance procedures when they believe that they have been unfairly treated, there must be no retaliation taken against any employee who gives information or appears before the Academic Standards and Student Services or Judicial Committees. Retaliation will not be tolerated and will subject an individual to College disciplinary procedures.


11. Academic Policies

11.1 General Course Policies

11.1.1 Course Prerequisites

Certain courses have course or other requirements that must be satisfied prior to registration. Prerequisites are intended to ensure that a student has sufficient preparation for a course.

11.1.2 Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend all classes for each of their courses.

An absence from class may be excused at the instructor’s discretion for reason of personal or family emergency, injury, jury duty, participation in a College-sponsored activity (which is any activity on or off campus, which is initiated, approved, or supervised by the College), or any other reason for good cause.

Students may request an excused absence from class by submitting a completed excused absence form to the Office of Student Affairs in advance of any absence or, if doing so in advance is infeasible, immediately upon their return to class. The form requires the signature of each instructor whose class will be missed. If informed, the Office of Student Affairs will notify faculty of student absence when students are unable to contact their instructors due to an unexpected emergency.

Whether an absence is excused or unexcused, students are responsible for obtaining information and assignments covered during the class periods missed. Instructors will make reasonable arrangements to accommodate excused absences with an opportunity to make up the work missed.

After two unexcused absences in a course, each additional unexcused absence, at the discretion of the instructor, normally results in a reduction of 5 points (on a 100-point scale) of the student’s final grade. Instructors are permitted to issue a grade of “IA” (Insufficient Attendance) if a student has exceeded a threshold of unexcused absences.

11.1.3 Tardiness to Class

Students are expected to arrive on time for each class period. Habitual tardiness to class could result in a reduction of the student’s final grade, as follows:

  • Arriving to class up to 15 minutes late counts as one late occurrence;
  • Arriving to class more than 15 minutes late counts as one absence;
  • Three late occurrences count as one absence.

11.1.4 Late Assignment Penalty

Conscientious completion and on-time submission of all required assignments is expected in all courses. In fairness to the course instructor and the students who complete their work on time, any assignment submitted late will be assessed a penalty (e.g., a reduction of the assignment grade by 30 percent for every 24 hours it is late) unless stipulated otherwise by the instructor.

11.1.5 Final Exams

Students are expected to be present for exams and should plan their schedules to accommodate the scheduled exam times. Whether an examination will be rescheduled to accommodate travel or other plans is up to the discretion of each department.

11.1.6 Auditing a Course

Subject to approvals by the course instructor and the department offering the course, certain courses may be audited. (Studio, applied music, and intership/practicum courses may not be audited.)

The privileges of an auditor are limited to registering in, paying tuition and fees for, and attending classes. The auditor does not complete assignments or take examinations. The auditor will receive no credit for the course, and it will not fulfill any academic requirements, but the course will appear on the student’s transcript with the grade “AUD” (Audit).

Students wishing to audit a course should check with their academic advisor. Auditors must notify the Office of the Registrar of their special registration status in the course before the end of the Course Selection Period. All students who register for six credits or more are eligible to audit courses of up to one half of the total paid credits.

11.1.7 Repeating a Course

Most courses can be completed only once for credit (non-repeatable-for-credit courses), whereas some courses have been designed to be repeated a specific number of times for additional credit (repeatable-for-credit courses).

Courses generally may be attempted once more than their limit. In this case, the student cannot earn credit for the last attempt, but GPA calculation will omit the student’s lowest grade in the course.

Example 1: LAS100 may be completed only once for credit. Alice completes this course once, earning a “C.” She then takes the course a second time, earning an “A.” She earns no additional credit from the second attempt, but GPA calculation uses only her “A” and disregards the “C.”

Example 2: CCD101R may be completed only twice for credit. Ben attempts this course twice, earning a “B” and an “F.” He then takes the course a third time, earning an “A.” The first and third attempts yield credit. GPA calculation uses only his “A” and “B” and disregards the “F.”

The transcript will include each course attempt. An attempt resulting in a grade of “W” (Withdrawal) represents an uncompleted attempt and does not count toward the course’s repeat limit.

When a student attempts a course that is nominally the same as one the student previously attempted, but where the course content is substantially different, the new attempt does not count as a repeat. Examples include a second independent study on a different topic and repeating a major instrument course on a different instrument.

Students may not register for a course for which they received transfer credit.

11.2 General Academic Policies

11.2.1 Unit of Academic Credit

FTC apportions academic credit for undergraduate and graduate coursework based on the semester credit hour. Semester credit hour means that a credit is granted for the satisfactory completion of a course that normally requires 15 hours (of 50 minutes each) of instruction and at least 30 hours of supplementary assignments and work.

Lecture and seminar courses assign one credit for every 1 hour of class time and 2 hours of preparation required per week over 15 instructional weeks.

Studio and lab courses assign one credit for every 2 to 3 hours of practice or lab work required per week over 15 instructional weeks.

For an instructional session having a length other than 15 weeks, the number of weekly hours that correspond to one credit is scaled accordingly.

11.2.2 Credit for Prior Learning

Fei Tian offers matriculated students the opportunity to receive academic credit for documented prior college-level learning acquired through previous study or through non-classroom experiences.

Prior learning may include, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Credit transfer from another institution
  • Credit by examination
  • Credit by portfolio evaluation

The awarding of prior learning credit is conditioned on the following:

  • The student must be matriculated at Fei Tian College.
  • Prior learning must not duplicate or overlap previous coursework, or diminish the rigor of the program.
  • Credit from prior learning is not included in calculating grade point average.
  • The total number of credits awarded for prior learning may not exceed 50 percent of the credits required for graduation.

The determination of credit for prior learning is ultimately made by the Registrar in consultation with the department Chairs.

Credit Transfer

Students may apply for transfer of credit earned at other institutions, including institutions accredited by U.S. Department of Education-recognized accrediting bodies, degree-granting institutions authorized by the NYS Board of Regents, and colleges and universities outside of the U.S. that are recognized by Fei Tian College.

Transfer of credit is subject to the following conditions:

  • The credit must carry a grade of at least C+ for general education courses and at least B for courses in the student’s area of study. Pass/no pass credit is not transferable unless a pass/no pass option also exists at Fei Tian for the equivalent course.
  • The other institution offering the course allows it to be taken for credit toward the equivalent degree.
  • The course offered at the other institution is substantially similar in content and rigor to the course at Fei Tian: i.e., (1) covers at least 75 percent of the same course material; (2) yields at least the same number of credits as does the equivalent course at Fei Tian; (3) includes requirements for comparable graded assignments/exams; and (4) uses a comparable textbook (if applicable).
  • In computing transfer credits, quarter credits shall be converted to semester credits. Unless specified otherwise, one quarter credit equals two-thirds of a semester credit (e.g., 3 quarter credits equal 2 semester credits).
  • For the BFA degree programs, a student may transfer up to 30 general education credits toward the degree.
  • For the BM degree program, a student may transfer a maximum of 30 general education credits and 30 music credits, up to a total of 60 credits, toward the degree.

Students may request a transfer of credit from another institution by submitting a Transfer Credit Form to the Office of the Registrar, together with an official transcript, course descriptions and syllabi of the courses for which transfer credit is sought, and any other information FTC requires to conduct a proper evaluation.

Approved transfer credits will appear on FTC transcripts within approximately four weeks of official receipt of the request.

Credit by Examination
Standardized Exams

FTC recognizes standardized exams, including Advanced Placement (AP), College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Examinations, and International Baccalaureate (IB). To request credit by standardized exam, the student must submit a written request to the Registrar and order an official score report to be sent to the Office of the Registrar. A student may earn credit from a maximum of five standardized exams. Approved credit(s) by standardized exam will appear on the student’s transcript within approximately four weeks of receipt of the official score report(s).

FTC Comprehensive Exams

Students who have acquired the knowledge and skills taught in a particular course can opt to demonstrate that they can pass the course without taking it. To do so, the student must submit a written request to the Chair of the department offering the course, explaining how the student has already met the goals and objectives of the course. The Chair will determine whether the course is available for credit by examination and whether the student is eligible to sit for the exam. If the Chair is satisfied with the student’s performance on the exam, the Chair can recommend to the Registrar that the student receive credit for the course. Normally, a student may earn credit by exam for at most one course per semester.

Credit by Portfolio Evaluation

Students may develop a portfolio for credit to document experiential learning acquired through professional, creative, volunteer, or other experiences, to be assessed by faculty or equivalent subject area experts.

11.2.3 Double-Counting Credit

Under certain circumstances where doing so would not diminish the requirements of any program, a single course may be used to fulfill more than one requirement, either across the curriculum or toward two degrees.

11.2.4 Class Standing for Undergraduates

Class standing represents an undergraduate student’s progress toward graduation. It is based on the number of credits earned toward the degree, including credits for prior learning. The following table shows the number of credits required at each classification.

Undergraduate Class Standing Classifications

Classification Credits required
Freshman Less than 32.5
Sophomore At least 32.5 but less than 68.5
Junior At least 68.5 but less than 100.5
Senior 100.5 or more

11.2.5 Course Load

At FTC, students typically study on a full-time basis. Full-time status is defined as registering each required semester for a minimum of 12 credits for undergraduate students, or 9 credits for graduate students. Exceptions to the rule exist for students in their final semester who need less than a full load of credits to complete their programs, for students who register for a course load that yields the requisite load credits but numerically fewer academic credits, and for graduate students who have been certified by the institution for full-time student status.

Part-time status is defined as registering in a minimum of one course per semester but less than full-time status. Students interested in switching to part-time status should check with their academic advisor for information on how their academic standing, financial aid awards, student privileges, and, for international students, U.S. legal status, could be affected.

Students may not take over 20 credits of courses per semester unless expressively permitted by their Departments and the Office of Academic Services.

11.2.6 Academic Integrity

Truthfulness is a core value of the Fei Tian experience. Academic misconduct undermines the educational process and the sense of integrity that characterizes the College community. It is expected that all academic goals be achieved through honorable means. Specifically, students are expected to support and abide by the provisions of the College’s Academic Integrity Policy, which prohibits cheating, falsification, plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration, engaging in prohibited behavior, and any other conduct that violates academic integrity. Suspected academic misconduct may be reported through the procedures set forth in the Code of Student Conduct.

11.2.7 Participation in Assessment

Students at the College are expected to spend several hours during their programs participating in College-wide outcomes assessment activities, such as tests, surveys, and interviews.

11.2.8 President’s Honor List

Full-time, matriculated undergraduate students who earn a semester GPA of 3.7 or higher receive the “President’s Honor List” distinction for that semester, provided that the student has no “W” (Withdrawal) or “I” (Incomplete) grade during that semester.

11.2.9 Program Variance

Students may petition for an academic program variance from a particular College policy or course requirement if the request is adequately supported through a written statement describing the rationale for the variance and information as requested. Petitions may be submitted to the Office of the Provost (for undergraduate students) or the Director of Graduate Studies (for graduate students). Final decisions are at the discretion of the program of study’s chief academic officer.

11.2.10 Time Limits for Degree Completion

Baccalaureate degrees must be completed within seven years of initial enrollment, and master’s degrees must be completed within five years of initial enrollment.

Periods of official leave of absence are excluded from the time limits set for completion of degrees. Any extension of a time limit must be initiated by the student through a formal petition for a program variance.

11.2.11 Special Accommodations

Fei Tian coordinates reasonable special accommodations for qualifying individuals with disabilities, including temporary disabilities due to injury. Students must request special accommodations through the Office of Student Affairs and should notify their course instructors promptly thereafter of accommodations made for their courses.

11.2.12 Leaves of Absence

A matriculated student in good standing who desires to take a temporary leave from the College with the intent to return must consult the Office of Student Affairs and submit a completed and signed Leave Form to the Office of the Registrar for review and acceptance. The student bears ultimate responsibility for completing the official leave-taking process and notifying all relevant administrative offices in a timely fashion. For academic and financial purposes, the effective date of a leave of absence is the date indicated on the Leave Form or the date of receipt, whichever is appropriate.

11.2.13 Withdrawal from the College

A student’s withdrawal from the College is a permanent separation. Reasons why a student may withdraw from the College include to transfer to another institution or to leave the College without a definite plan to return.

A student who seeks to withdraw from the College in good standing must ordinarily complete an exit interview at the Office of Student Affairs and complete the exit procedures, which include submitting a completed Withdrawal Form to the Office of the Registrar for processing and promptly notifying all student services offices. For a withdrawal from the College that occurs before the fifth week of the semester, no courses or grades for that semester will appear on the student’s transcript. For a withdrawal that occurs in the fifth week of the semester or later, a final grade of “W” (Withdrawal) will be entered for all registered courses.

Administrative withdrawal is a College-initiated withdrawal that occurs when students, by the middle of a semester, have failed to attend class or have not registered for any courses, and have not been granted a leave of absence. In this case, a final grade of “F,” “NP,” or “IA” will be entered for all registered courses.

See Tuition Refund Policy for details on the tuition refund policy.

See Return and Refund of Financial Aid for details on financial aid adjustment.

11.3 Grading Policies

11.3.1 Grading System

Fei Tian College uses two grading scales: letter grade and pass/no pass.

The basic letter grades are “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” and “F.” The College gives instructors the option to add a plus or minus to letter grades (except “F”), yielding grades such as “A+” and “C–.”

The pass/no pass grades are “P” and “NP.”

The following table details the letter grades, the pass/no pass grades, and the various other grading codes that may appear on a student’s transcript.

Grades and Grading Codes

Grade Percent Grade Points Allows Credit Description
A+ 97–100 4.3 Yes
A 93–96 4.0 Yes
A- 90–92 3.7 Yes
B+ 87–89 3.3 Yes
B 83–86 3.0 Yes
B- 80–82 2.7 Yes
C+ 77–79 2.3 Yes
C 73–76 2.0 Yes
C- 70–72 1.7 Yes Lowest passing grade for graduate students
D+ 67–69 1.3 Depends*
D 63–66 1.0 Depends*
D- 60–62 0.7 Depends* Lowest passing grade for undergraduate students
F 0–59 0.0 No
P Depends* N/A Yes Pass. Passing grade in a P/NP course or in a course for which the student elected the P/NP option.
NP Depends* N/A No No pass. Failing grade in a P/NP course or in a course for which the student elected the P/NP option.
AFE 0.0 No Absent from final examination. For unexcused absences.
AUD N/A No Audit.
CR N/A Yes Credit is awarded or requirement is met.
FIN 0.0 No Failed incomplete. Assigned when the time to resolve an “I” grade expires.
I N/A No Incomplete. Approved extension of time to complete course requirements.
IA 0.0 No Insufficient attendance. Includes stopping attending a course without withdrawing.
IP N/A No Course is in progress. No grade is assigned at this time.
MX N/A Yes Medical excuse. By petition to the department Chair. Grants a waiver of credit. Can be used in one semester only.
NGR N/A No No grade reported. Decision pending.
PX N/A Yes Professional excuse. Performance courses only. By petition to the department Chair.
W N/A No Course withdrawal.
  • For undergraduate students, the minimum passing letter grade is “D–” and the “P” grade corresponds to a percentage range of 60–100. For graduate students, the minimum passing grade is “C–” and the “P” grade corresponds to a percentage range of 70–100.

11.3.2 Pass/No Pass Option

The Pass/No Pass option was designed to encourage students to explore a new academic area or take a particularly challenging course without undue concern about their academic performance in the course.

By electing the Pass/No Pass option for a certain course, the student will be graded by the instructor as usual throughout the course, but the final grade that appears on the student’s transcript will be a “P” (Pass) if the instructor assigns a passing letter grade, or an “NP” (No Pass) if the instructor assigns a failing letter grade or an “IA” or “AFE” grade, or if the grade is “FIN.” All other grades, including “I,” “W,” and “PX,” are not converted and appear on the student’s transcript unchanged. Courses taken on a Pass/No Pass basis do not affect the GPA.

Students may earn a maximum of eight credits per degree with the Pass/No Pass option. Each use of the Pass/No Pass option must be approved by the student’s academic advisor. Credits earned by taking a course on a Pass/No Pass basis do not fulfill any General Education, major core, or electives requirement.

11.3.3 Incomplete Grades

The “I” grade (Incomplete) may be assigned at the discretion of the instructor when a student’s work in a course is of passing quality but is incomplete and the student formally requests an “I” grade by the last class session. In requesting an “I” grade, the student should discuss with the instructor the reason the work is incomplete and exactly what coursework remains to be completed.

The course instructor has discretion to grant or deny the request and to determine the conditions under which the incomplete grade is made up, including setting a deadline within a one-year timeframe. Under no circumstance should a student re-register for a class to complete an “I.” Registering for a course a second time invokes the “Course Repetition” rules.

An “I” is a temporary notation that must be changed to a permanent grade on the student’s transcript within a maximum of one year. To confirm the student’s completion of the assigned work and replace the “I” grade, the instructor must submit a Change of Grade Form to the Office of the Registrar. Otherwise, the student’s grade will automatically change to a “FIN” (Failed Incomplete).

11.3.4 Grade Change

Once final grades have been posted by the Office of the Registrar, they will be changed only in exceptional circumstances and only with the approval of the instructor and the Chair of the department offering the course.

To request a grade change, instructors must submit a completed Change of Grade Form to the Chair of the department offering the course for consideration. If the request is granted, the instructor must forward the Change of Grade Form to the Office of the Registrar for processing.

11.3.5 Grade Point Average

A grade point average (GPA) summarizes a student’s academic performance.

A GPA is a weighted average. It is calculated as the total number of grade points earned divided by the total credit weight of courses attempted. For each grade, the number of grade points is the grade’s assigned grade points multiplied by the course’s credit weight. This calculation excludes grades that do not affect GPA, such as certain grades earned when repeating a course (see the Repeating a Course section).

Useful types of GPA include semester GPA (calculated from a student’s grades within a single semester), cumulative GPA (calculated from all of a student’s grades), and major GPA (calculated from all grades a student received in courses that his/her major requires).

11.4 Academic Progress

11.4.1 Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students are expected to remain in good standing at the College and be making satisfactory academic progress in their programs.

Generally, satisfactory academic progress is determined on the basis of:

  1. Registering for the minimum required course load each semester for enrollment;
  2. Satisfactorily completing at least 75 percent of the courses attempted each semester. All grades except “AUD,” including “I” and “W” grades, contribute towards this measure. For the purposes of this standard, repeating a course counts towards credits attempted.
  3. Achieving and maintaining the required grade point average. Undergraduate students: Each student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of freshman class standing, and for the remainder of the student’s undergraduate studies thereafter. This GPA is calculated from all of the student’s undergraduate-level credits attempted at the College. Graduate students: Each student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 at the end of the student’s first semester of graduate studies, and for the remainder of the student’s graduate studies thereafter. This GPA is calculated from all of the student’s graduate-level credits attempted at the College and (if applicable) all of the student’s undergraduate-level credits attempted while enrolled in a graduate program at the College.
  4. Attempting at most 150% of the minimum number of credits that the student’s program requires. For example, a student enrolled in a program that requires a minimum of 130 credits may attempt at most 195 credits.
  5. Making satisfactory progress in the student’s program, in the determination of the department.

Failure to make satisfactory academic progress can result in sanctions including, but not limited to, the revocation of financial aid.

11.4.2 Good Standing

Students who are making satisfactory academic progress in their programs are deemed to be in good standing at the College if they additionally:

  • Have paid any and all College bills in a timely manner;
  • Are not on academic or disciplinary probation or academic suspension; and
  • Are abiding by the laws of the United States.

11.4.3 Academic Sanctions

Failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress can result in a variety of academic sanctions for students, as detailed below:

Academic Warning: A student who is making only marginal academic progress in the determination of the instructor may receive an oral warning.

Academic Probation: A student demonstrating unsatisfactory academic progress may be placed on academic probation for the next semester. During the probationary period, financial aid will still be available. But if the student fails to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress the next semester, the financial aid will be revoked. Students on academic probation are subject to course load requirements and must earn a minimum semester GPA of 2.5 (for undergraduate students) or 3.0 (for graduate students) to be returned to good standing. Those who do not achieve good standing during the probationary period will move to academic suspension, dismissal, or a second semester on academic probation, to be determined by the College.

Academic Suspension: A student may face immediate academic suspension for a particularly severe case of unsatisfactory academic progress. During the suspension, the student shall be excluded from classes and other College privileges or activities, including access to the College campus and College-sponsored activities off campus. The duration and conditions of academic suspension are to be determined by the College on a case-by-case basis. A student may reestablish standing in the College by requesting reinstatement to probationary or good standing after completing the suspension period.

Academic Dismissal: A student may face academic dismissal from the College if (1) (s)he has spent at least one semester on academic probation and has not regained good standing; (2) (s)he has spent at least one semester on academic suspension and has not fulfilled the conditions of the suspension; or (3) the severity of the case otherwise warrants dismissal from the College. Decisions on academic dismissal are made by the College on a case-by-case basis. Academic dismissal generally results in a student’s permanent separation from the College.

11.5 Changing of Academic Programs

11.5.1 Change of Concentration or Major Instrument

Currently enrolled students who are considering changing their concentration or their major instrument within the same degree program should consult with their department chair and academic advisor prior to requesting a change. Students in the baccalaureate dance program are eligible to request a change in concentration before the end of their third year. Students in the baccalaureate music program are eligible to request a change in major instrument if they are equally competent on a second instrument.

Students who wish to change their concentration or major instrument within the same degree program must submit a completed Change of Concentration or Major Instrument Form to the Office of the Registrar to request the change. A change of concentration or major instrument requires approval by the department Chair and the major advisor for the changed concentration or major instrument. An audition is required for a change in major instrument.

Students will be notified of the decision by the Office of the Registrar. Students whose requests have been approved will thereupon be subject to the graduation requirements of the new concentration or major instrument.

11.5.2 Change of Degree Program

Currently enrolled students who are considering changing to another degree program should consult with their current major advisor as well as the current and prospective departments' Chairs prior to requesting a change. Students who have completed less than 50 percent of their current major’s degree requirements may be eligible to change programs.

To be considered for admission to another degree program, students are required to submit a completed short-form application for admission to the Office of the Registrar. Applications must be reviewed and approved by the admissions committee before students can be granted registration privileges for their new program. Note that F-1 international students who have recently changed their programs of study will need to promptly request a new I-20 from the Office of International Services.

11.6 Graduation

11.6.1 Graduation Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees

To graduate, students must meet all College and departmental requirements as described in this catalog. Where applicable, students must also meet certain specific academic requirements as posted by academic departments.

Graduation is contingent on the following:

  1. Satisfactory completion of the required credits for the program.
  2. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 and a major GPA of at least 2.5.
  3. A minimum of 50% of the required course credits for a major must be earned at Fei Tian College.

Graduation with a second baccalaureate degree requires completion of a minimum of 30 semester credits in addition to those required for the first degree and completion of all requirements for the second degree.

11.6.2 Graduation Honors for Baccalaureate Degrees

Seniors who have maintained a record of exceptional achievement during the duration of their degree program may be recognized with an honors designation upon graduation. The three levels of recognition are distinction, high distinction, and highest distinction. Specific criteria to graduate with honors are established by each department, which will rank its graduating students accordingly.

11.6.3 Application to Graduate

Fulfilling graduation requirements and formally applying to graduate is each student’s responsibility. Candidates for graduation must file an application to graduate with the Office of the Registrar in their penultimate semester of study. To ensure that all program requirements will be met, students should review their degree audit and make an appointment with their academic advisor at the Office of Academic Services.

11.6.4 Participation in Commencement Exercises

Commencement exercises are normally held once a year for each campus. Participation in commencement exercises is limited to students in good standing who either (1) have completed all graduation requirements since the previous commencement or (2) are within no more than 2 courses or 6 credits of the total required for graduation and are registered to complete these the following semester.

11.7 Second Degree

11.7.1 Second Degree vs. Double Major

Fei Tian College permits qualified individuals to pursue an additional baccalaureate degree (second degree). A second degree applicant is an individual who previously earned a baccalaureate degree, and now seeks to enroll in a baccalaureate degree program in an essentially different area of study.

The College currently does not offer any double program or double major.

11.7.2 Policies for Second Degree

Application in this category is via the standard process for transfer applicants.

Graduation with an additional degree is contingent on the following:

  • Earning, in residence, a minimum of 30 credits of courses that are core courses within the additional degree program. Credits that the student has previously used to fulfill the requirements of a previous degree do not count.
  • Meeting all requirements for the additional degree program in effect at the date of matriculation.
  • Meeting any and all financial obligations to the College and any or all of its supporting agencies.
  • Following all College and academic policies, including course sequencing rules in the additional degree program.

Advising policies and guidelines:

  • For their free electives, students are encouraged to take courses they have not previously taken.
  • Students may, however, opt to retake courses they previously took, in order to, for example, improve their skills or earn a higher grade.

12. Undergraduate Programs

Fei Tian’s undergraduate degree programs are rigorous and designed for the serious aspiring scholar or artist who seeks a professional career or advanced studies in the arts or sciences.

12.1 General Education

All undergraduate students at the College must meet the general educational course requirements as they progress toward graduation. These requirements ensure that graduates of the College are familiar with subject matter from the major branches of human knowledge as well as different modes of inquiry within the humanities, quantitative studies, and the social sciences.

12.1.1 Program Purpose

The purpose of the General Education program is to equip students with the skills and judgment essential to a lifelong pursuit of truth in an increasingly dynamic, pluralistic, and challenging world. In particular, we seek to inculcate in students not just analytical precision and the ability to question within one’s specialization but also an overall moral awareness and appreciation for the beauty and virtues embodied by traditional cultures.

12.1.2 Program Learning Outcomes

Before being awarded a degree, all baccalaureate-seeking students are expected to demonstrate an appropriate level of competence in the following areas:

  1. Cultural Inquiry. The ability to critically engage with multiple cultures or civilizations, including their literature, philosophy, and art, and understand how their legacy has shaped our world today.
  2. Communication Skills. The ability to engage diverse audiences with appropriate oral, written, and visual modes of communication and rhetorical strategies.
  3. Information and Technology Literacy. The ability to identify, evaluate, and utilize information from a variety of sources in support of lifelong learning.
  4. Analytical Discernment. The ability to evaluate arguments and solve problems using multiple methods of reasoning.
  5. Ethical and Engaged Citizenship. The ability to appreciate and discuss principles of ethics and morality and apply these for personal improvement and responsible civic engagement.

12.1.3 Curriculum Overview

All undergraduate students are required to complete the General Education (Gen Ed) Core. The Gen Ed Core is composed of coursework in ten distinct areas, totaling a minimum of 40 credits. Detailed requirements are listed in the table below.

Each degree program can augment the core requirements by incorporating additional course areas, increasing the number required credits in some areas, or requiring specific courses in certain areas.

College-Wide General Education Core Curriculum

General Education Area Minimum Credits
College Core (11 cr)
   College Success 2
   College English 3
   World Civilizations 6
Breadth Distribution (21 cr)
   Humanities 6
   Writing and Rhetoric 3
   Quantitative Reasoning 3
   Scientific Reasoning 3
   Art and Aesthetics 5
   Values and Ethics 1
World Language and Literature (8 cr)
Total Required Credits 40

12.1.4 Approved Gen Ed Courses

College Core

LAS100 College Success (2 credits)

Designed to help students achieve greater success in college and in life. Topics include many proven strategies for creating greater academic, professional, and personal success, such as time management and note-taking skills. In addition, the information literacy skills students develop will not only prepare them for doing original research in college but also equip them for success in the 21st-century workplace.

ENG101 Effective English (3 credits)

Offers a highly structured approach to academic writing with a focus on the recursive nature of the writing process. Students read a variety of pieces by masters of the craft, engage in critical discussion, and write constantly throughout the course sequence. Assignments include several short response pieces as well as three to four major papers, ranging from process analysis to argumentation. This course is highly practical in nature and is meant to hone some of the skills most valuable to college success and career readiness. Prerequisite: Placement test.

CIV101 Western Civilization (3 credits)

Surveys the major achievements of Western civilization from its beginnings to the end of the Renaissance, with emphasis on developments in the visual and creative arts. An organizing theme of the course is the relationship between religious values and humanistic achievement. Multimedia and primary source readings feature prominently, both of which students will be expected to respond to in writing. Prerequisite: ENG101 or by instructor consent.

CIV102 Chinese Civilization (3 credits)

A survey of the salient features and legacies of Chinese civilization throughout China’s five millennia of history. Topics include literary, religious, and philosophical traditions; the transformation of China’s political, educational, and examination systems; and the radical cultural changes in the 20th century.

Humanities

HUM125 U.S. Society and Government (3 credits)

This course is a survey of the U.S. political system at the national level including treatment of the historical background, central concepts and revisions of the constitutional framework, examination of the presidency, congress, federal bureaucracy, judicial structure and process, political parties, interest groups, the media, and current public issues.

HUM204 Survey of Western Literature (3 credits)

A chronological survey of major authors in western literature since earliest times to the 19th century. Encompassing works in all major genres ranging from epics and tragedies to novels and poetry, the course provides opportunities for students to critically engage with literary texts, examining their ideological implications as well as aesthetic and stylistic characteristics. Prerequisite: ENG101.

HUM221 The Making of the Modern World (3 credits)

A survey of the political, cultural, and social history of Europe, America, and Asia from the Enlightenment (18th century) to the Cold War. Major topics include the French Revolution, Romanticism, nationalism, imperialism, revolutions and world wars, and the Cold War. Prerequisite: LAS110 and CLC131, or by instructor consent. Prerequisite: CIV101 or by instructor consent.

HUM222 Topics in Chinese History (3 credits)

An in-depth study of the Qin and Han dynasties, Tang and Song dynasties, or Ming and Qing dynasties. Topics include literary, religious, and philosophical traditions; major events and historical figures; royal families and their roles throughout history; and the transformation of China’s economic, political, and bureaucratic examination systems. Prerequisite: CIV102.

HUM231 Comparative Culture: China and West (3 credits)

A course that compares the most salient features of the Chinese and Western cultures in their major aspects, including geographical conditions, language and writing system, philosophical systems, government and political philosophy, law, international relations, war and military science, economic life, family and social structure, and art and literature. Prerequisite: CIV101 and CIV102 or by instructor consent.

MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval - Early Baroque) (2 credits)

This survey course of the history of Western music offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the Medieval until the Middle Baroque period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts during these periods of Western music history.

MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque - Classical) (2 credits)

This course offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the High Baroque to the Classical period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts of these periods of Western music history.

MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic - Contemporary) (2 credits)

This course offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the Romantic to the contemporary period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts of these periods of Western music history.

Writing and Rhetoric

ENG104 Public Speaking (3 credits)

A workshop-style course designed to help students become better communicators in their social and professional lives. Emphasis is on overcoming self-consciousness and developing clarity of thought and expression. Students examine real-life speeches, exploring the interplay of the many elements of oration and rhetoric, such as structure, diction, enunciation, eye contact, and body language. Students present informational, persuasive, and impromptu speeches throughout the course and also practice interview skills. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG201 Technical Writing (3 credits)

This course provides development of technical writing skills through writing technical content of different types associated with principles of reasoning, applied writing assignments, research, analytical reports that may include pictorial/statistical data, reading and interpreting technical and nontechnical material. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG205 Writing for Media (3 credits)

This course will explore various Mediums of Media and methods to approach writing for each one. This course covers the basics of news writing: news stories, feature stories, and opinion pieces. Students will practice writing for online as well as print publications and analyze scripts for film. Journalistic ethics and law will be discussed throughout the course as various issues arise. This course is writing-intensive and requires students to practice writing every day. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG221 Debate and Argumentation (3 credits)

This course seeks to equip students with a set of systematic strategies that increase their abilities to react critically and to form arguments in various fields. It helps students improve their communicative and public speaking skills through lectures, debates in class, critiques, evaluations, and watching and listening to others speak.

Quantitative Reasoning

MAT101 Mathematics in Applied Context (3 credits)

This course provides comprehensive coverage of essential topics in mathematics including: trigonometry; discrete mathematics; analytic geometry; algebra and elementary functions; and an introduction to calculus. The lessons develop mathematics using numerous examples, real-world applications, and an engaging narrative. Graphs, diagrams, and illustrations are used throughout to help students visualize concepts.

STA101 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)   

This course is an introductory course in statistics intended for students in a wide variety of areas of study. The goal is to teach basic knowledge in statistical concepts and establish understanding of basic statistical methods. Students will also learn simple R codes to execute those methods to gain experience in statistical computing.

MAT103 Linear Algebra (4 credits)

This is an introductory linear algebra course intended for students in science, engineering, and other related areas. Students will learn basic concepts and tools in linear algebra as well as practice writing numerical codes in Python to execute key algorithms such as Gaussian Elimination and LU factorization.

MAT104 Applied Calculus (3 credits)

This course is an introductory calculus course covering basic analytic geometry of graphs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integration and applications to biomedical science and other disciplines. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics (including trigonometry and logarithms) or a pre-calculus course.

MAT105 Calculus I (4 credits)

This course is the first part of the Calculus course covering topics such as limits, derivatives, and integration of single-variable functions. Application and execution of these mathematical tools to real-world problems with theoretical derivation or numerical coding is also introduced. This course is intended for students in science, engineering, economics, and computer science, among other disciplines.

MAT106 Calculus II (4 credits)

This course is the second part of the Calculus course covering topics such as advanced techniques of integration, polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, and multiple integrals. Application of these mathematical tools to real-world problems is also introduced. In addition, students will practice simple numerical coding to execute algorithms learned from the course. Prerequisite: MAT105.

Scientific Reasoning

ECO101 Principles of Economics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of concepts, theories, and analytical techniques of microeconomics. It focuses on the analysis of choices made by individual decision-making units (individuals, households, and firms). The use of a market, supply and demand, model will be the fundamental model in which trade-offs and choices will be considered through comparison of costs and benefits of actions. Production and market structure will be analyzed at the firm level. The role of government policy to address microeconomic market failures will be examined.

BMS132 Nutrition, Health and Wellness (3 credits)

Understanding nutrition is essential for lifelong health and wellness. This course will describe the anatomy and physiology of nutrient digestion, absorption, and utilization throughout all stages of human life. The various classes of nutrients, essential vitamins and minerals and their role in metabolism will be explored. This course will focus on teaching behavioral change and personal decision making so that students will be able to monitor, understand, and affect their own nutritional behaviors.

BMS135 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of psychology. Topics to be covered include: key figures in psychology, major psychological theories, examples of major research findings, data collection on the causes and correlates of behavior, and the use of psychological knowledge to improve the quality of our lives. This survey of psychology will acquaint the student with the major concepts and terminology of the discipline and provide a better understanding of self and others.

BSC100 Principles of Biology (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. Topics include characteristics of life, scientific method, basic cell chemistry and biochemistry, cellular and sub-cellular structure, transport across cell membranes, cell energy, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, patterns of inheritance, DNA & RNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, genetic mutation, evolution, microorganisms, plants and fungi, human transporting systems, human maintenance systems, human digestive system and nutrition, and ecology.

BSC100L Principles of Biology Lab (1 credit)

This course, in cooperation with the Principles of Biology lecture, is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. This course will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture.

CHM100 Principles of Chemistry (3 credits) Fall

This introductory course investigates the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include scientific measurement, states of matter, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction reactions, chemical bonding, nomenclature, gases, heat of formation of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics.

CHM100L Principles of Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

This course introduces laboratory exercises in physical and chemical properties of matter, with an introduction to both qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis. Topics include molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, acid-base chemistry, kinetics, and an introduction to spectrophotometric methods of analysis, and thermochemistry. The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials of CHM100.

PHY101 General Physics I (3 credits)

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence. It starts with mechanics, which includes the study of linear, circular and rotational motion, how to apply Newton’s laws and the concepts of energy and momentum. It also covers thermodynamics including temperature, heat transfer, and changes in state and ends with the analysis of the sinusoidal nature of simple harmonic motion.

PHY101L General Physics I Lab (1 credit)

A hands-on physics lab that covers the fundamental principles of physics including measurement, motion, work and thermodynamics with emphasis on problem solving. Experiments have been selected to reinforce the material presented in Physics 101, which should be taken concurrently.

LAS334 Topics in Liberal Arts and Sciences (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary seminar course designed to reinforce students' critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and quantitative skills. Students engage in intensive reading of texts and journal articles on selected topics in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences and also apply mathematical concepts and modeling to real-world scenarios. Through extensive discussion and writing of analytical responses, students hone their ability to detect underlying assumptions, evaluate the validity of arguments and experimental design, and express their viewpoints with clarity and precision. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Art and Aesthetics

ARH101 Art History I (3 credits)

This course covers the history of art and architecture in both Western and non-Western cultures from Paleolithic to the Early Renaissance.

ARH102 Art History II (3 credits)

This course builds on ARH101 Art History I and covers the history of art and architecture in the West from the Early Renaissance (approximately 1500 CE) to the Late Realism (Early 1900s) periods.

ART111 Visual Literacy I (2 credits)

This course covers the principles, elements, and foundations of design and the formal aspects of visual composition through readings, discussions, exercises, and laboratory applications. This is a visual design theory course that introduces the core concepts of visual design — visual elements, principles of design and creative process. Composition issues and strategies are explored through examples, exercises, critiques and creative projects.

ARH131 History of Graphic Design (3 credits)

This course explores the history of graphic design from the earliest communication technologies to the present, with a focus on the Modern era. It will examine changes in style and technology within the field and consider the relationship between graphic design and its cultural, political, and social contexts.

DAN242 History of Dance: East and West (2 credits)

This is a survey of the development of the major dance traditions of the East and the West. It examines the origins of the dance traditions and major milestones while reflecting on the philosophical and aesthetic underpinnings of the different dance forms.

CCD341 History of Classical Chinese Dance (3 credits)

This is a survey of the development of classical Chinese dance. It examines the origins of the dance tradition and major milestones while reflecting on the philosophical and aesthetic underpinnings of the different dance forms.

CCD412A Advanced Choreography A (2 credits)

This course focuses on choreographing in the styles of the different ethnic dance traditions in China. There will be in-depth study of the cultural characteristics of the ethnic dances. Both English and Chinese will be used in the instruction.

MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) (1 credit)

This overview course provides students the tools to understand the different music periods through history and familiarize students with the main composers, music literature, and genres.

MUS211A/B Advanced Western Music Theory A/B (2 credits each)

In addition to the study of more advanced harmonic progressions, this course sequence focuses on the function each harmony and melody expresses as well as the relation to the larger form at hand. Included in the study of larger forms are ternary, rondo, and sonata forms. Phrase structure and small forms are addressed in depth from melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic perspectives. The course also consolidates students' knowledge of 19th-century chromatic harmony while introducing 18th-century imitative counterpoint and 20th-century harmony. Prerequisite: MUS111B for MUS211A, MUS211A for MUS211B.

MUS204 History of Music (3 credits)

A browse of western music and its evolution from the middle-age period to the early romantic era, covering important composers and significant historic events during those times. Upon completion of this course the students will be able to gain perspectives in fundamental western music history through the middle-age to 19th century (divided by three periods: the middle-age, the renaissance, and baroque up to classical and early romantic periods) and draw conclusions through informed historic facts and personal interpretations.

MUS243 History of Chinese Music (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic history of Chinese Music that will form a foundation of Chinese Music knowledge for more advanced learning both in music and dance fields.

SPD101 Fundamentals of Stagecraft and Production (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic elements and principles of theater production. Topics include set, lighting, and sound design, production safety, and basic concepts of stage management. Course activities include lectures, tests, and a final exam.

SPD140 Introduction to Theater History and Practices (3 credits)

This course surveys the fundamental elements of theater, including acting techniques, the roles of the director and producer, and stage and costume design. It also gives students a sweeping historical tour of theater, from ancient Greece to Medieval Europe and from the Yuan Dynasty in China to the European Renaissance and the present. Through reading/watching plays and writing critiques, students will gain a better understanding of and appreciation for the traditions behind any theatrical performance they may attend.

Values and Ethics

PHL101 Moral Awareness and Spiritual Practice (1 credit)

This seminar course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts of the spiritual practice of Falun Dafa as well as of the major world traditions, such as Buddhism, Taoism, and Christianity, thereby reinforcing awareness of the universal values that have informed humankind’s moral life for thousands of years. Through seminars, readings, and discussion, students are guided to build a solid foundation for righteous belief and ethical conduct. They will also have a chance to engage various moral issues and ethical questions in an introspective and reflexive manner.

PHL130 Philosophical Perspectives I (1 credit)

This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the field of philosophy and ethics, acquaint students with the terminology and major concepts of the disciplines and provide students with a deeper understanding of different philosophical and ethical viewpoints. The course aims to help students gain a better understanding of oneself, life and the universe. The part I will cover different philosophies and schools of thought throughout history with a focus on Western Perspectives.

PHL131 Philosophical Perspectives II (1 credit)

Part II will focus on different philosophies and schools of thought throughout the history of China.

PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III (1 credit)

Part III will engage critical thinking, debate and argumentation on a survey of philosophical topics in connection with today’s world. Prerequisite: PHL130 and PHL131.

World Language and Literature

CLC101, 102 Beginning Chinese I, II (4)

Beginning Chinese is designed for non-heritage Chinese speakers. Through interactive classroom activities and practice, students will acquire fundamental knowledge of the Chinese language and develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Upon completion of these courses, students should be capable of basic communication in a Mandarin-speaking environment. Students are also expected to have an active reading and speaking vocabulary of 400 Chinese characters. Prerequisite: None for CLC101, CLC101 or placement test for CLC102.

CLC111, 112 Elementary Chinese I, II (4)

Designed as an introductory course sequence for heritage speakers as well as for learners who have completed CLC102 or the equivalent. Building upon the students' oral/aural abilities, these courses develop students' competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Mandarin Chinese, with special emphasis on reading and speaking. By the end of these courses, students are expected to apply in daily use an active vocabulary of 800 Chinese characters, have a good command of basic idiomatic expressions and sentence patterns, be able to converse with ease on familiar topics, and be able to write short narratives and personal communications. Prerequisite: CLC102 or placement test for CLC111, CLC111 or placement test for CLC112.

CLC211, 212 Intermediate Chinese I, II (4)

Holistically develops students' reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the Chinese language at the intermediate level. Students are expected to have an active vocabulary of 1,600 of the most commonly used Chinese characters, including 200 idioms and phrases; be able to read expository and narrative writings with familiar vocabulary; have the speaking skills to cope with unfamiliar real-life situations; be able to write straightforward narrations and descriptions; and demonstrate a detailed understanding of Chinese culture and society. Prerequisite: CLC112 or placement test for CLC211, CLC211 or placement test for CLC212.

CLC311, 312 Advanced Chinese I, II (4)

Further develops listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese, with an emphasis on vocabulary building and developing lifelong reading habits. Students explore various ways to acquire vocabulary while gaining relevant cultural knowledge. They also study representative authentic articles in modern Chinese from various genres and develop the ability to use different reading strategies for different purposes. Furthermore, students are exposed to opportunities to summarize, explain, and persuade through effective writing. Multimedia and online resources are used extensively. Prerequisite: CLC212 or placement test for CLC311, CLC311 or placement test for CLC312.

12.2 BFA in Arts Management

Dr. Jim C. Li
Associate Professor, Chair
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Shujia Gong
Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering
George Mason University

Dr. Tony Liu
Associate Professor 
Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Pathology
Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Zheng Qu
Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences
The University of Chicago

Ms. Kaishin Yen
Associate Professor
M.I.A.
Columbia University

Mr. Eric Bess
Assistant Professor 
MFA in Fine Art
Academy of Art University

Dr. Ellen L. Jin
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Applied mechanics and Mathematics
Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Mr. Matthew Kutolowski
Assistant Professor
M.A.
Columbia University

Dr. Eve Y. Lee
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Community and Regional Planning
University of British Columbia, Canada

Dr. Gloria J. Liu
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Brad McDuffie
Assistant Professor 
Ph.D. in Literature and Criticism
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Ms. Hannah Han
Instructor
MA in Ancient Chinese Literature
South China Normal University

Ms. Grace Freed
Lecturer
M.S.
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Michelle Xu
Lecturer
PharmD
Purdue University

Mr. Nan-Cheng Chen
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MM in Performance
Julliard School of Music

Mr. Stephen Grodnick
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MA in Social Studies
Lehman College

Dr. Tanya Harrison-Huston
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology
Wright State University

Dr. Hong Jiang
Adjunct Assistant Professor
PhD in Geography
Clark University

Mr. Dan Pelonis
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MFA magna cum laude. Painting
The New York Academy of Art

Dr. Jason Wang
Adjunct Instructor
Ph.D. in Condensed Matter Physics
University of Houston

12.2.1 Program Purpose

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Arts Management program seeks to produce students who have fundamental knowledge of arts management, adequate proficiency in one arts specialization (performing arts or fine arts), as well as a clear understanding of art aesthetics, leadership, and their impact on society.

12.2.2 Program Objectives

  1. To provide students with an in-depth understanding of and adequate proficiency in the art specialty of the student’s choice and to develop within students an appreciation of the art’s role in humanity’s history, cultures and societal traditions and values.
  2. To enable students to develop a solid foundation in management theory and methods with applications to the arts field, as well as critical thinking skills for lifelong learning.
  3. To equip students with the ability to apply their knowledge and techniques, leadership, and communication skills to real-world arts management in a professional, ethical, and moral manner.

12.2.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

  1. Apply a range of business concepts towards the professional and ethical management of the arts
  2. Demonstrate a broad awareness of art history and aesthetics in general, and as they relate to their chosen concentration
  3. Perform the techniques, skills and craft in their chosen concentration

12.2.4 Program Concentrations

A student may choose either performing arts or fine arts as their art specialty. Students choosing performing arts will study fundamental techniques in dance or music as well as related history and theory. Graduates from this concentration seek career in performing arts organizations or similar settings.

Students choosing fine arts will study fundamental techniques in drawing and painting as well as related history and theory. Graduates from this concentration seek careers as practicing artists, art entrepreneurs, or in museum, galleries and so on.

12.2.5 Curriculum Overview

The curriculum for the BFA in Arts Management is a 125-semester credit program with three main components: major requirements, general education, and free electives.

BFA in Arts Management Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 79
   Management Core 27
   Major Electives 18
   Concentration courses, one of
     Performing Arts 30
       History/Theory/Literature 14
       Techniques/Practices 16
     Fine Arts 30
       History/Theory/Literature 13
       Techniques/Composition 17
   Senior Synthesis and Career Development 4
General Education 40
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses
     *Including 5 cr provided by the major
40*
   Additional Gen-Ed Courses 5
Free Electives 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 125

12.2.6 Graduation Requirements

The academic requirements for graduation from the BFA in Arts Management program are the successful completion of the curriculum with a grade point average of no less than 2.0. In addition, a graduate must have taken at least 50% of all courses from the College.

12.2.7 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (79 Credits)

The major requirements are comprised of management core courses, major electives, and art concentration courses. Management core provides students with training on business management, marketing, finance, and accounting, as well as non-profit organization fundraising. Students can further expand their knowledge in arts and management through elective courses. Additionally, all students will choose one area of art in which they want to specialize: performing arts or fine arts.

Major Required Courses for BFA in Arts Management

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Management Core (27 cr)
ACC221 Financial Accounting 3 None
ACC222 Managerial Accounting 3 ACC221
AMG335 Fund Raising for the Arts 3 None
AMG431 Business Plan Development 3 MKT201 & ACC222
BUS121 Fundamentals of Arts Management 3 None
BUS213 Business Finance 3 ACC221
BUS331 Arts and Entertainment Law 3 None
MGM331 Organizational Behavior 3 None
MKT201 Principles of Marketing 3 None
Major Electives (18 cr)
   Choose a minimum of 9 Cr from the following list and the rest from either the following list
     or any ARH, ART, DRP, DSG, DAN, DAB, MUS course(s) in upper division
AMG334 Public Relations for the Arts 3 None
MKT321 Digital Marketing 3 MKT201
CIS102 Introduction to Computing 3 None
ECO211 Microeconomics 3 ECO101
HRM301 Introduction to Human Resource Management 3 None
BUS211 Marketing for Creative Industries 3 None
BUS214 Financial Market and Investment 3 ACC221
DAS341 Business Data Analysis 3 STA101
AMG351 Art Management Junior Internship 3 Dept. Approval
MGM432 Managing and Leading Organizations 3 None
Senior Synthesis and Career Development (4 cr)
   Choose one of:
AMG455 Senior Project 4 Dept. Approval
AMG459 Arts Management Practicum 4 Dept. Approval
AMG469 Arts Management Internship 4 Dept. Approval
Concentration: Choose one of
   Concentration – Performing Arts (30 cr)
     History/Theory/Literature 15
ARH102 Art History II 3 None
DAN141 Introduction to Performing 2 None
DAN232 Dance Anatomy 2 None
DAN242 History of Dance: East and West 2 None
DAN311A Dance Pedagogy I 2 None
MUS240A History of Western Music A 2 None
MUS240B History of Western Music B 2 MUS240A
     Techniques/Practices 15
       Select a minimum of 16 cr from the following courses
DAB101R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet I 6 None
DAB201R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet II 6 DAB101R
DAB301R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet III 6 DAB201R
DAN121R Introduction to Repertoire of Dance 2 None
DAB221R Repertory and Rehearsal I: Ballet 3 DAN121R
DAB312A Choreography I: Classical Ballet 2 None
DAN101R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance I 6 None
DAN201R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance II 6 DAN101R
DAN301R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance III 6 DAN201R
DAN221R Repertory and Rehearsal I: Classical Chinese Dance 2 DAN121R
DAN312A Choreography I: Classical Chinese Dance 2 None
DAN132 Modern Dance 2 Instructor approval
MUS102 Keyboard Skills 2 None
MUS202 Advanced Keyboard Skills 2 MUS102
   Concentration – Fine Arts (30 cr)
     History/Theory/Literature 13
ARH101 Art History I 3 None
ARH102 Art History II 3 None
ARH131 History of Graphic Design 3 None
ART111 Visual Literacy I 2 None
DSG215 Design with Color 2 None
     Techniques/Composition 17
       Select a minimum of 17 cr from the following courses or select any DRP and/or DSG courses from FAD curriculum
ART101A Perspective A 2 None
ART101B Perspective B 2 ART101A
ART103 Introduction to Sculpture 2 None
ART107 Dynamic Composition 2 None
ART105 Photography 2 None
Total Major Requirements 79
General Education (40 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core.

The following major courses also fulfill the Art and Aesthetics requirement (5 credits) in Gen Ed for students in Fine Arts and Design.

Degree Specified Courses for the Gen Ed Core

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
Performing Arts Concentration
MUS240A History of Western Music A 2 Art and Aesthetics
MUS240B History of Western Music B 2 Art and Aesthetics
DAN242 History of Dance: East and West 2 Art and Aesthetics
Fine Arts Concentration
ARH101 Art History I 3 Art and Aesthetics
ART111 Visual Literacy I 2 Art and Aesthetics

BFA in Arts Management majors are required to take the following additional Gen Ed courses.

Degree Required Additional Gen Ed Courses

Code Course Title Credits
BMS132 Nutrition, Health and Wellness 3
PHL132 Philosophical Perspectives II 1
PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III 1

Free Electives (6 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 9 credits of courses of their choice offered by the College.

12.3 BFA in Classical Chinese Dance

The Bachelor of Fine Arts program in Classical Chinese Dance is an intensive program that enriches students with the knowledge, techniques, and abilities needed for a wide range of career options including advanced studies in related professional fields.

12.3.1 Introduction to Classical Chinese Dance

Classical Chinese dance is one of the world’s most comprehensive dance systems. It was passed down in part through martial arts, folk traditions, traditional Chinese opera, and the ancient court. Throughout history, classical Chinese dance was enriched with the philosophical and cultural traits of each of China’s dynasties, resulting in an art form that today can express the essence of Chinese culture in its movements, postures, and aesthetics.

In the modern era, classical Chinese dance has been organized into a formal dance system with methodological training in four component areas: shen-fa (form; the poses and movements that make up the vocabulary of the art form), shen-yun (bearing; a way of expressing the dancer’s inner feelings and the style of classical Chinese dance), ji-qiao (a variety of special techniques for jumping and spinning), and tan-zi-gong (flipping and tumbling techniques).

12.3.2 Program Purpose

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program in Classical Chinese Dance seeks to systematically train students in the techniques, artistry, and theoretical framework necessary to perform, create, and advance classical Chinese dance.

12.3.3 Program Objectives

  1. Prepare students for successful careers in performance, choreography, and/or teaching of classical Chinese dance.
  2. Help students develop a genuine appreciation for the beauty and depth of classical Chinese dance.
  3. Nurture in students the integrity and ethicality necessary for building and sustaining a successful professional career.
  4. Provide students opportunities to gain real-world performance experience, in order to better prepare them for careers related to the field.

12.3.4 Program Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the BFA program, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate professional-level techniques and performance ability in classical Chinese dance.
  2. Apply principles of dance composition to produce creative works.
  3. Sustain and forward classical Chinese dance using supportive theoretical knowledge.

12.3.5 Curriculum Overview

The curriculum for the BFA in Classical Chinese Dance is a 135-semester credit program with three main components: major requirements, general education core, and free electives.

BFA Classical Chinese Dance Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 91
   Techniques 52
   Performance and Repertory 14
   Choreography 8
   Dance Theory and History 13
   Capstone 4
General Education 35
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses
     *Including 5 cr provided by the major
40*
Free Electives 9
Total Required Credits for Graduation 135

12.3.6 Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all the required credits in the Major Requirements, General Education Core and Free Electives, with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 and a minimum major GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate.

12.3.7 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (87 credits)

Major requirements for the BFA in Classical Chinese Dance comprises of 74 credits of studio core courses and 13 credits of academic core courses. The studio core courses cover systematic training in classical Chinese dance and Chinese folk and ethnic dances as well as provide ample opportunities for students to learn a wide range of repertoire and create dance compositions. The academic core courses provide important foundational knowledge in music fundamentals, pedagogy, dance science, history, and production so that students may become well-rounded artists.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Studio Core Requirements
   Techniques (52 cr)
CCD101R Classical Chinese Dance I 10 None
CCD201R Classical Chinese Dance II 10 CCD101R
CCD301R Classical Chinese Dance III 10 CCD201R
CCD401R Classical Chinese Dance IV 10 CCD301R
CCD102R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances I 2 None
CCD202R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances II 2 CCD102R
CCD302R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances III 2 CCD202R
CCD402R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances IV 2 CCD302R
CCD103R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance I 2 None
CCD203R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance II 2 CCD103R
   Performance and Repertory (14 cr)
CCD104 Performing and Acting 2
CCD221R Repertory and Rehearsal I 4 None
CCD321R Repertory and Rehearsal II 4 CCD221R
CCD421R Repertory and Rehearsal III 4 CCD321R
   Choreography (8 cr)
CCD312A Choreography A 2
CCD312B Choreography B 2 CCD312A
CCD412A Advanced Choreography A 2 CCD312B
CCD412B Advanced Choreography B 2 CCD412A
Academic Core Requirements
   Music Fundamentals (4 cr)
CCD105 Music for Dancers I 2 None
CCD205 Music for Dancers II 2 CCD105
   Dance Science (2 cr)
CCD211 Mind, Body, and Dance 2 None
   Pedagogy (2 cr)
CCD311A Dance Pedagogy A 2 None
   Dance History (3 cr)
CCD341A History of Classical Chinese Dance A 1.5 None
CCD341B History of Classical Chinese Dance B 1.5 None
   Dance Production (2 cr)
CCD431 Stagecraft and Dance Production 2 None
   Capstone (4 cr)
Choose one of:
CCD452 Research Paper 4 Senior Standing
CCD451 Senior Production 4 Senior Standing
CCD455 Advanced Dance Practicum IV 4 Senior Standing

General Education Core (35 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core. Students of the BFA program in Classical Chinese Dance will, through their required major courses, fulfill the 5 credit Gen Ed requirement for Art & Aesthetics. This means students must take an additional 35 credits in Gen Ed courses from the LAS Department to complete the Gen Ed Core requirements.

Code Course Title Credits Gen Ed Area
CCD341A History of Classical Chinese Dance A 1.5 Art and Aesthetics
CCD341B History of Classical Chinese Dance B 1.5 Art and Aesthetics
CCD412A Advanced Choreography A 2 Art and Aesthetics

Free Electives (9 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 9 credits in courses of their choice offered by the College.

Electives that are offered by the Classical Chinese Dance Department are provided in the table below.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
CCD155 Dance Practicum I 3 Instructor consent
CCD255 Dance Practicum II 3 Instructor consent
CCD355 Dance Practicum III 3 Instructor consent
CCD311B Dance Pedagogy B 3 DAN311A
CCD351 Independent Study in Dance 1–4 Instructor consent
CCD361 Internship 1–3 Instructor consent
CCD313 Policies and Standards in Dance Education 1
CCD411 Educational Psychology in Context 2

12.4 BFA in Dance

Fei Tian’s BFA in Dance program is one of select US college dance programs that combines dance traditions from the East and the West–with concentrations in Classical Ballet alongside of Classical Chinese dance. The undergraduate curriculum includes courses in technique, repertoire, pedagogy, choreography, anatomy, and arts management, preparing students for various careers related to dance.

12.4.1 Program Purpose

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance program seeks to instill a solid foundation and an excellent educational experience to prepare qualified and aspiring students for careers or advanced studies in Classical Ballet, Classical Chinese Dance or a related field.

12.4.2 Program Objectives

  1. Provide students with a solid foundation in the techniques, methods, knowledge, and application of either classical ballet or classical Chinese dance.
  2. Provide students with opportunities to engage with dance knowledge—including choreography, teaching, and administration—and the ability to appreciate the cultures, values, and arts of different traditions.
  3. Enable students to apply professional skills in future careers related to dance, along with a sense of teamwork, professional attitudes, and ethical judgment.

12.4.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the correct execution of dance movements in Classical Ballet and/or Classical Chinese Dance.
  2. Rehearse and perform expressively in front of a live audience.
  3. Use choreographic tools to create original dance works.
  4. Explain and contextualize key concepts from dance-based pedagogy, kinesiology, arts administration, and dance history/cultural studies through discussions, essays, exams, and presentations.
  5. Exhibit a professional work ethic and practically apply knowledge from dance academic courses by completing projects and/or professional internships.

12.4.4 Program Concentrations

The program offers two concentrations: Classical Ballet and Classical Chinese Dance.

Classical Ballet: This concentration offers courses in fundamental ballet training, pointe, partnering, repertoire, plus related academic studies. This concentration is designed to prepare students for immediate employment as dancers, choreographers, directors, and dance educators, and/or arts management. Some students may choose to go on to graduate studies.

Classical Chinese Dance: This concentration offers courses in fundamental classical Chinese dance training, tumbling, Chinese ethnic and folk dances, repertoire, plus related academic studies. This concentration is designed to prepare students for immediate employment as dancers, choreographers, directors, and dance educators, and/or arts management. Some students may choose to go on to graduate studies.

12.4.5 Curriculum Overview

Curriculum Overview

The curriculum for the BFA in Dance is a 123-semester credit program with three major components: major requirements, general education, and free electives.

BFA in Dance Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 80
   Dance Fundamental Skills and Training 14
   Dance History, Education and Administration 15
   Concentration courses, one of
     Classical Ballet 47
       Skills 34
       Repertoire 6
       Choreography 4
       Music 4
   Classical Chinese Dance 47
       Skills 36
       Repertoire 5
       Choreography 4
       Music 3
   Professionalism and Research 4
General Education 37
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses
     *Including 5 cr provided by the major
40*
   Additional Gen-Ed Courses 2
Electives 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 123

12.4.6 Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all the required credits in the Major Requirements, General Education Core and Free Electives with a minimum GPA of 2.0 in order to graduate.

12.4.7 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (80 credits)

During the first year, all students follow the basic curriculum by taking the core dance courses in both Chinese Classical Dance and Classical Ballet. In the second year, students should declare their concentration; and next three-year sequence is specially designed for each “concentration”. Training in both concentrations equips students with technical and performance skills, artistry development, and the cultivation of a profound understanding of Classical Ballet or Classical Chinese, the two most comprehensive dance systems in the world. The program also prepares students for a wide range of career options including advanced studies in related professional fields.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Dance Fundamental Skills and Training (14 cr)
DAN101R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance I 6 None
DAB101R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet I 6 None
DAN121R Introduction to Repertoire of Dance 2
Dance History, Education, and Administration (15 cr)
DAN232 Dance Anatomy 2 None
DAN242 History of Dance: East and West 2 None
DAN311A Dance Pedagogy I 2 None
DAN311B Dance Pedagogy II 3 DAN311A
BUS121 Fundamentals of Arts Management 3 None
   Select one of the following
MKT201 Principles of Marketing 3 None
BUS221 Marketing for Creative Industry 3 None
Dance Professionalism and Research (4 cr)
   Select one of the following
DAN451 Senior Project 4 None
DAN455 Senior Internship 4 None
Concentration: Choose one of
   Concentration - Classical Ballet (47 cr)
     Skills and Techniques 34
DAB201R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet II 6 DAB101R
DAB301R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet III 8 DAB201R
DAB401R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet IV 8 DAB301R
DAB102R Ballet - Pointe & Partnering I 2 None
DAB202R Ballet - Pointe & Partnering II 4 DAB102R
DAB302R Ballet - Pointe & Partnering III 6 DAB202R
     Repertory 6
DAB221R Repertory and Rehearsal I: Ballet 3 DAN121R
DAB321R Repertory and Rehearsal II: Ballet 3 DAB221R
     Choreography 4
DAB312A Choreography I: Classical Ballet 2
DAB312B Choreography II: Classical Ballet 2 DAB312A
     Music 3
MUS140 History of Music 3 None
   Concentration - Classical Chinese Dance (47 cr)
     Skills and Techniques 36
DAN201R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance II 6 DAN101R
DAN301R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance III 8 DAN201R
DAN401R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance IV 8 DAN301R
DAN103R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance I 2 None
DAN203R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance II 2 DAN103R
DAN104R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances I 2 None
DAN204R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances II 2 DAN104R
DAN102R Shen Yun I 3 None
DAN202R Shen Yun II 3 DAN102R
     Repertory 4
DAN221R Repertory and Rehearsal I: Classical Chinese Dance 2 DAN121R
DAN321R Repertory and Rehearsal II: Classical Chinese Dance 2 DAN221R
     Choreography 4
DAN312A Choreography I: Classical Chinese Dance 2 None
DAN312B Choreography II: Classical Chinese Dance 2 DAN312A
     Music 3
MUS243 History of Chinese Music 3 None
Total Major Requirements 80
General Education (37 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core.

The following major courses also fulfill the Art and Aesthetics requirement (5 credits) in Gen Ed for students in Dance.

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
Classical Ballet Concentration
MUS140 History of Music 3 Art and Aesthetics
DAN242 History of Dance: East and West 2 Art and Aesthetics
Classical Chinese Dance Concentration
MUS243 History of Chinese Music 3 Art and Aesthetics
DAN242 History of Dance: East and West 2 Art and Aesthetics

BFA in Dance majors are required to take the following an additional Gen Ed courses.

Degree Required Additional Gen Ed Courses

Code Course Title Credits
PHL132 Philosophical Perspectives II 1
PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III 1
Free Electives (6 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 6 credits of courses of their choice offered by the College.

12.5 BFA in Fine Arts and Design

The Fine Arts and Design program offers two concentrations: oil painting and graphic design. The oil painting concentration adopts the classical painting techniques and traditions. It provides students with a systematic approach to this invaluable artistic legacy of the west, incorporating the best features of the intensive Atelier training environment within a rigorous academic setting.

The graphic design concentration provides the same foundation in classical drawing and painting techniques, as well as traditional aesthetics principles. At the same time, students will learn modern design technologies, tools, and software. Graduates from this concentration will stand out amongst their peers with a solid training in classical fine arts techniques and perspectives that will underpin their creations in the digital format.

Depending on their chosen concentration, students will develop the ability to either practice the art of painting in the classical form or apply the beauty of classical fine arts perspectives to their design and creativity.

12.5.1 Program Purpose

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Fine Arts and Design program seeks to produce students with a solid grasp of fundamental techniques, skills, and concepts in the visual arts as well as an understanding of art aesthetics, history, theory, and management. The program prepares students for careers in drawing, painting, graphic design, or advanced studies in related areas.

12.5.2 Program Objectives

  1. To provide students with a solid foundation and a systematic training in crafting techniques, theories, methods, knowledge, and application of fine arts.
  2. To equip students with the ability to combine and apply professional knowledge and skills to practical problem solving and decision-making related to fine arts, along with a sense of teamwork, professional attitude, and ethical judgment.
  3. To enable students to develop communication and critical thinking skills for life-long learning, the ability to appreciate human cultures, arts, traditional values, and a respect for moral character.

12.5.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate with proficiency the creation of compositions that successfully use appropriate tools, elements of art and principles of design.
  2. Communicate art technique, history, and theory clearly and concisely to a layperson.
  3. Critically think about the purpose of making art and art’s influence on culture.
  4. Effectively communicate and present oneself and work in a professional manner by developing and maintaining an online presence.
  5. Students undertaking the Oil Painting concentration will be able to construct a technically sound painting on multiple substrates and media.
  6. Demonstrate with proficiency the ability to work with designers, art directors, project leads, and individual clients (real or hypothetical).

12.5.4 Program Concentrations

This program offers two concentrations: Oil Painting and Graphic Design. Oil Painting is a long-standing form of artistic expression. Students in this concentration will follow the “Academic Art” training, study portrait techniques and skills, figure, and landscape painting as well as classical drawing, and culminate in the composition of oil painting.

Graphic Design has become a significant industry today with an array of applications. Students in this concentration take a wide range of courses related to visual communication, including basic training in drawing, painting, color as well as typography and information design, motion graphics, web, and interactive design.

12.5.5 Curriculum Overview

The BFA in Fine Arts and Design is a 126-semester credit curriculum with three major components: major requirements, general education, and free electives.

BFA in Fine Arts Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 83
   Drawing Fundamentals Skills and Training 14
   Art History and Theory 11
   Concentration courses, one of
     Oil Painting 48
       Drawing Skills and Techniques 24
       Oil Painting Skill and Techniques 20
       Composition 4
     Graphic Design 48
       Fundamental Design Skills 21
       Design History, Theory, Lectures 14
       Electives 13
   Professionalism and Career Development 10
General Education 37
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses
     *Including 5 cr provided by the major
40*
   Additional Gen-Ed Courses 2
Free Electives 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 126

12.5.6 Graduation Requirements

The academic requirements for graduation are the successful completion of the curriculum with a grade point average of no less than 2.0. In addition, a graduate must have taken at least 50% of all courses from Fei Tian College.

12.5.7 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (83 credits)

The major requirements are comprised of foundation courses in art history, theory, and composition; and courses that provide a solid technical foundation in drawing, painting, and graphic design, as well as courses that help students develop professional experience and insight for career development.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Drawing Fundamental Skills and Training (14 cr)
ART101A Perspective A 2 None
ART102A Art Anatomy A 2 None
DRP101 Drawing I 4 None
ART107 Dynamic Composition 2 None
DRP102 Painting 4 DRP101
Art History and Theory (11 cr)
ARH101 Art History I 3 None
ARH102 Art History II 3 ARH101
ARH203 Art History III 3 ARH102
ART111 Visual Literacy I 2 None
Professionalism and Career Development (10 cr)
   Choose two of:*
BUS121 Fundamentals of Arts Management 3 None
ART351 Junior Internship 3 Permission Form
MKT321 Digital Marketing 3 MKT201
   Choose one of:
ART451 Senior Project 4 Dept. Approval
ART461 Senior Internship 4 Dept. Approval
Concentration: Choose one of
   Concentration – Oil Painting (48 cr)
     Drawing Skills and Techniques 24
ART101B Perspective B 2 ART101A
ART102B Art Anatomy B 2 ART102A
DRP201R Drawing II 4 DRP101R
DRP301R Drawing III 6 DRP201R
DRP401R Drawing IV 6 DRP301R
DRP103 Quick Sketch Techniques 2 None
ART103 Introduction to Sculpture 2 None
     Oil Painting Skill and Techniques 20
DRP202 Still Life Painting 2 DRP102B
DRP203 Landscape Painting 2 DRP102B
DRP204 Small-scale Painting 2 DRP102B
DRP321 Portrait Painting 2 DRP202,DRP203
DRP322 Half-length Portrait 2 DRP321
DRP323A Nude Painting A 2 DRP322
DRP323B Nude Painting B 2 DRP323A
DRP324R Full-body Painting 4 DRP322
ART410 Mural Art 2 DRP324R
     Composition 4
DRP310R Composition I 2 DRP204
DRP410R Composition II 2 DRP310R
   Concentration – Graphic Design (48 cr)
     Fundamental Design Skills 21
DSG101 Design Studio I 3 None
DSG102 Design Studio II 3 DSG101
DSG201 Design Studio III 3 DSG102
DSG202 Design Studio IV 3 DSG201
DSG103 Typography Design I 3 None
DSG104 Typography Design II 3 DSG103
DSG203 Typography Design III 3 DSG104
     Design History and Theory (select at least 14 cr) 14
ARH131 History of Graphic Design 3 None
ART112 Visual Literacy II 3 ART111
DSG151 Image Making 3 None
DSG215 Design with Color 2 None
DSG241 Brand Identity 3 DSG102
MKT201 Principles of Marketing 3 None
     Design Elective (select at least 13 cr) 13
ART101B Perspective B 2 ART101A
ART102B Art Anatomy B 2 ART102A
DRP202 Still Life Painting 2 DRP102B
DRP203 Landscape Painting 2 DRP102B
ART103 Introduction to Sculpture 2 None
ART105 Photography 2 ART105
DSG321 Motion Graphics Studio I 3 DSG321
DSG322 Motion Graphics Studio II 3 DSG322
DSG331 Environmental Graphic Design 2 DSG102
DSG332 Advertising Design 3 DSG102
DSG334 Web Design 3 DSG102
ART410 Mural Art 2 DRP324R
DRP103 Quick Sketch Techniques 2 None
DRP341 Intro to Illustration I 2 DRP103
Total 83
General Education (37 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core.

The following major courses also fulfill the Art and Aesthetics requirement (5 credits) in Gen Ed for students in Fine Arts and Design.

Degree Specified Courses for the Gen Ed Core

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
ARH101 Art History I 3 Art and Aesthetics
ART111 Visual Literacy I 2 Art and Aesthetics

BFA in Fine Arts and Design majors are required to take the following an additional Gen Ed courses.

Degree Required Additional Gen Ed Courses

Code Course Title Credits
PHL132 Philosophical Perspectives II 1
PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III 1
Free Electives (6 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 6 credits of courses of their choice offered by the College.

12.6 BFA in Stage Production and Design

The Bachelor of Fine Arts program in Stage Production and Design offers pre-professional intensive training to develop designers and craftspeople for the performing arts and entertainment media industries.

12.6.1 Program Purpose

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program in Stage Production and Design seeks to systematically train students with a solid technical foundation in the fields of set design, drafting, sound, lighting, and digital media techniques, as well as pre-professional experience and insight into real-life stage production and design.

12.6.2 Program Objectives

Goals of the program include:

  1. Enable students to lay a solid foundation in the fields of scenery and set, lighting, sound, digital media, stage management, and resource management, while building professional communication and collaboration skills.
  2. Develop students' artistic and cultural sensitivity, aesthetics, breadth, and professionalism, and assist them to integrate the artistic and the technological aspects of stage production and design.
  3. Provide students opportunities to gain real-world experience in the stage production and design process, in order to better prepare them for careers related to the field.

12.6.3 Program Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the BFA program, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the fundamentals of traditional theater stage techniques including scenic, lighting, costume, and sound design.
  2. Design scenery and set, lighting, sound, and backdrops, in accordance with the requirements of different performances and under the restrictions of the specificities of different theaters.
  3. Apply and integrate visual elements, such as colors, shapes, and styles, into stage production and design, including scenery, set, backdrop, and costume design, on the basis of traditional aesthetics.
  4. Adapt design to suit the theatrical needs of different cultural settings.
  5. Effectively use technology to gather and communicate ideas and information to accomplish a specific task.
  6. Collaborate with others to successfully complete production and design on the basis of a solid understanding of all aspects of stage production, including stage management and resource management.

12.6.4 Curriculum Overview

The BFA in Stage Production and Design is a 128-semester credit curriculum with three major components: major requirements, general education, and free electives.

BFA in Stage Production and Design Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 87
   Theory and history 13
   Set Design 5
   Drafting 4
   Digital Media Techniques 9
   Sound 6
   Lighting 3
   Costume Design 3
   Practice 13
   Capstone Experience 11
   Major Electives 20
General Education 35
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses
     *Including 5 cr provided by the major
40*
Electives 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 128

12.6.5 Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all the required credits in the Major Requirements, General Education Core and Free Electives, with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 and a minimum major GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate.

12.6.6 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (87 credits)

The major requirements are comprised of fundamental courses in theater production, which provide students a solid technical foundation in the fields of set design, drafting, sound, lighting, and digital media techniques, as well as pre-professional experience and insight into real-life stage production and design.

Code Course Title Cr Prerequisite(s)
Theory and history (13 cr)
SPD111 A&B Drawing A & B (2 credits each) 4 None
SPD140 Intro. to Theatre History and Practices 3
SPD202 Fundamentals of Electricity and Electronics 3
SPD330 Intro. to Stage Management 3 None
Set Design (5 cr)
SPD101 Fundamentals of Stagecraft and Production 2 None
SPD212 Scenic and Set Design I 3 None
Drafting (4 cr)
SPD211 A&B Drafting A & B (2 credits each) 4 None
Digital Media Techniques (9 cr)
SPD120 Intro. to Digital Media 2 None
SPD220 Digital Media Production: Techniques 2 SPD120
SPD221 Digital Media 2D Matte Painting 3 None
SPD327 Rendering and Projection Techniques 2 None
Sound (6 cr)
SPD314 A&B Live Sound A & B 4 None
SPD317 Sound Recording Techniques 2 SPD314 A
Lighting (3 cr)
SPD213 Lighting Design and Production I 3
Costume Design (3 cr)
SPD316 Costume Design I 3 None
Practice (13 cr)
SPD150, SPD250, SPD350, SPD450 Rehearsal & Performance Production I, II, III, IV (1 credit each) 4 None
SPD155, SPD255, SPD355 Theater Production Practice I, II, III (3 credits each) 9 None
Capstone Experience (11 cr)
SPD455 Theater Production Practicum 3 SPD355
SPD456 A&B Portfolio / Senior Production / Thesis Project 8 None
Major Electives (select at least 20 cr)
SPD223 Digital Media Filming and Editing 4 SPD220
SPD325 Digital Media Composition 3 SPD220
SPD227 Intro. to Photography 2 None
SPD311 Scene Painting and Figure Drawing 2 SPD111B
SPD312 Scenic and Set Design II 3 SPD212
SPD315 Drafting C (Vectorworks) 2 SPD211B
SPD324 3D Modeling, Texturing, and Animation 4 None
SPD328 A&B Video Production for the Theater A & B 4 SPD220
SPD313 Lighting Design and Production II 3 SPD213
SPD351 Independent Study in Stage Production and Design 2
SPD414 A&B Advanced Live Sound A & B 4 SPD314B
SPD416 Costume Design II 3 SPD316
SPD426 A&B Digital Media Portfolio A & B 8 None
Total 111
General Education (37 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core.

The following major courses also fulfill the Art and Aesthetics requirement (5 credits) in Gen Ed for students in Stage Production and Design.

Degree Specified Courses for the Gen Ed Core

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
SPD101 Fundamentals of Stagecraft and Production 2 Art and Aesthetics
SPD140 Introduction to Theater History and Practices 3 Art and Aesthetics
Free Electives (6 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 6 credits of courses of their choice offered by the College.

12.7 BM in Performance

The Bachelor of Music in Performance program provides intensive conservatory-style training in Western and Chinese music so that students are well-versed in both musical traditions.

12.7.1 Program Purpose

The Bachelor of Music (BM) in Performance seeks to provide an excellent education experience that will prepare qualified and aspiring students for careers or advanced studies in music, especially in the context of understanding and interpreting music from both the Western and Chinese traditions.

12.7.2 Program Objectives

  1. Enable students to develop performance skills in order to be able to perform classical Western and Chinese music competently and with sensitivity and professionalism.
  2. Foster in students an understanding and appreciation of both the Western and Chinese musical traditions.
  3. Enable students to interpret and discuss music with respect to historical, cultural, and stylistic considerations.
  4. Provide students opportunities to gain real-world experience in performance, in order to better prepare them for careers related to the field.

12.7.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

  1. Perform as a soloist or an ensemble member at levels appropriate for entry-level professional musicians or for entering graduate music study.
  2. Demonstrate competency in musicianship through analyzing, arranging, creating, and orchestrating music.
  3. Interpret and discuss music with respect to its historical, cultural, and stylistic considerations.

12.7.4 Curriculum Overview

The curriculum for the BM in Performance (East-West Music) is a 135-semester credit program with three main components: major requirements, general education core, and free electives.

BM in Performance Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 97
   Applied Instrument 32
   Ensemble 24
   Recitals 0
   Musicianship 14
   Music Theory 10
   Music History and Literature 13
   Capstone Experience 4
General Education 29
   College-wide Gen-Ed Course
     *Including 11 cr provided by the major
40*
Free Electives 9
Total Required Credits for Graduation 135

12.7.5 Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all the required credits in the Major Requirements, General Education Core and Free Electives, with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 and a minimum major GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate.

12.7.6 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (97 credits)

Major requirements for the BM in Performance (East-West Music) comprises of applied instrument, ensemble, musicianship, theory, and history and literature coursework. Students are also expected complete a junior and senior recital as well as a capstone experience related to their studies.

Major Requirements for Strings, Woodwinds, Brass, and Harp

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s) Notes
Major Core for Strings, Woodwinds, Brass and Harp
   Applied Instrument (32 cr)
MUS121R Major Instrument I (Western) 8 None Take MUS121R (4 cr) twice
MUS221R Major Instrument II (Western) 8 MUS121R Take MUS221R (4 cr) twice
MUS321R Major Instrument III (Western) 8 MUS221R Take MUS321R (4 cr) twice
MUS421R Major Instrument IV (Western) 8 MUS321R Take MUS421R (4 cr) twice
   Ensemble (24 cr)
MUS120R Orchestra I 4 None Take MUS120R (2 cr) twice
MUS220R Orchestra II 4 MUS120R Take MUS220R (2 cr) twice
MUS320R Orchestra III 4 MUS220R Take MUS320R (2 cr) twice
MUS420R Orchestra IV 4 MUS320R Take MUS420R (2 cr) twice
MUS123R Chamber Music I 2 None Take MUS123R (1 cr) twice
MUS223R Chamber Music II 2 MUS123R Take MUS223R (1 cr) twice
MUS323R Chamber Music III 2 MUS223R Take MUS323R (1 cr) twice
MUS423R Chamber Music IV 2 MUS323R Take MUS143R (1 cr) twice
   Recitals (0 cr)
MUS351 Junior Recital 0 Junior standing
MUS451 Senior Recital 0 Senior standing
   Musicianship Courses (14 cr)
MUS001R Concert Attendance I 0 None Take MUS001R (0 cr) twice
MUS002R Concert Attendance II 0 MUS001R Take MUS002R (0 cr) twice
MUS003R Concert Attendance III 0 MUS002R Take MUS003R (0 cr) twice
MUS004R Concert Attendance IV 0 MUS003R Take MUS004R (0 cr) twice
MUS124R Concert Practice I 1 None Take MUS124R (0.5 cr) twice
MUS224R Concert Practice II 1 MUS124R Take MUS224R (0.5 cr) twice
MUS324R Concert Practice III 1 MUS224R Take MUS324R (0.5 cr) twice
MUS424R Concert Practice IV 1 MUS324R Take MUS424R (0.5 cr) twice
MUS101A Ear Training A 1 Placement test
MUS101B Ear Training B 1 MUS101A
MUS201A Advanced Ear Training A 1 MUS101B
MUS201B Advanced Ear Training B 1 MUS201A
MUS102A Keyboard Skills A 1 Placement test
MUS102B Keyboard Skills B 1 MUS102A
MUS202A Advanced Keyboard Skills A 1 MUS102B
MUS202B Advanced Keyboard Skills B 1 MUS202A
MUS326A Chinese Instrument Class A 1 None
MUS326B Chinese Instrument Class B 1 None
   Music Theory (10 cr)
MUS111A Western Music Theory A 2 Placement test
MUS111B Western Music Theory B 2 MUS111A
MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A 2 MUS111B Counts toward 5 cr requirement for Art & Aesthetics
MUS211B Advanced Western Music Theory B 2 MUS211A Counts toward 5 cr requirement for Art & Aesthetics
MUS311 Form and Analysis 2 MUS211B
   Music History and Literature (13 cr)
MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) 1 None Counts toward 5 cr requirement for Art & Aesthetics
MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval – Early Baroque) 2 MUS141 6 cr of humanities (instead of Modern World and Chinese History)
MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque – Classical) 2 MUS142 6 cr of humanities (instead of Modern World and Chinese History)
MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic – Contemporary) 2 MUS241 6 cr of humanities (instead of Modern World and Chinese History)
MUS244 Chinese Music I 2 None Equivalent to the discontinued MUS212 Chinese Music Theory and Repertoires
MUS245 Chinese Music II 2 MUS244 Equivalent to the discontinued MUS243 History of Chinese Music
MUS341 Orchestral Literature 2 None
   Capstone (4 cr)
   Choose one of:
MUS450 Research Paper 4 Senior standing
MUS452 Senior Project 4 Senior standing
MUS455 Advanced Music Practicum IV 4 Senior standing

Major Requirements for Piano

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Major Core for Piano
   Applied Instrument (32 cr)
MUS121R Major Instrument I (Western) 8 None
MUS221R Major Instrument II (Western) 8 MUS121R
MUS321R Major Instrument III (Western) 8 MUS221R
MUS421R Major Instrument IV (Western) 8 MUS321R
   Ensemble (24 cr)
MUS123R Chamber Music I 2 None
MUS223R Chamber Music II 2 MUS123R
MUS323R Chamber Music III 2 MUS223R
MUS423R Chamber Music IV 2 MUS323R
MUS128R Instrumental Accompaniment I 2 None
MUS228R Instrumental Accompaniment II 2 MUS128R
MUS328R Instrumental Accompaniment III 2 MUS228R
MUS428R Instrumental Accompaniment IV 2 MUS328R
MUS129R Dance Class Accompaniment I 2 None
MUS229R Dance Class Accompaniment II 2 MUS129R
MUS329R Dance Class Accompaniment III 2 MUS229R
MUS429R Dance Class Accompaniment IV 2 MUS329R
   Recitals (0 cr)
MUS351 Junior Recital 0 Junior standing
MUS451 Senior Recital 0 Senior standing
   Musicianship Courses (14 cr)
MUS001R Concert Attendance I 0 None
MUS002R Concert Attendance II 0 MUS001R
MUS003R Concert Attendance III 0 MUS002R
MUS004R Concert Attendance IV 0 MUS003R
MUS124R Concert Practice I 1 None
MUS224R Concert Practice II 1 MUS124R
MUS324R Concert Practice III 1 MUS224R
MUS424R Concert Practice IV 1 MUS324R
MUS101A Ear Training A 1 Placement test
MUS101B Ear Training B 1 MUS101A
MUS201A Advanced Ear Training A 1 MUS101B
MUS201B Advanced Ear Training B 1 MUS201A
MUS326A Chinese Instrument Class A 1 None
MUS326B Chinese Instrument Class B 1 None
MUS226A Piano Accompanying A 1 None
MUS226B Piano Accompanying B 1 MUS226A
MUS326A Advanced Piano Accompanying A 1 MUS226B
MUS326B Advanced Piano Accompanying B 1 MUS226A
   Music Theory (10 cr)
MUS111A Western Music Theory A 2 Placement test
MUS111B Western Music Theory B 2 MUS111A
MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A 2 MUS111B
MUS211B Advanced Western Music Theory B 2 MUS211A
MUS311 Form and Analysis 2 MUS211B
   Music History and Literature (13 cr)
MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) 1 None
MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval – Early Baroque) 2 MUS141
MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque – Classical) 2 MUS142
MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic – Contemporary) 2 MUS241
MUS244 Chinese Music I 2 None
MUS245 Chinese Music II 2 MUS244
MUS334 Piano Literature 2 None
   Capstone (4 cr)
   Choose one of:
MUS450 Research Paper 4 Senior standing
MUS452 Senior Project 4 Senior standing
MUS455 Advanced Music Practicum IV 4 Senior standing

Major Requirements for Percussion

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Major Core for Percussion
   Applied Instrument (32 cr)
MUS121R Major Instrument I (Western) 8 None
MUS221R Major Instrument II (Western) 8 MUS121R
MUS321R Major Instrument III (Western) 8 MUS221R
MUS421R Major Instrument IV (Western) 8 MUS321R
   Ensemble (24 cr)
MUS120R Orchestra I 4 None
MUS220R Orchestra II 4 MUS120R
MUS320R Orchestra III 4 MUS220R
MUS420R Orchestra IV 4 MUS320R
MUS123R Chamber Music I 2 None
MUS223R Chamber Music II 2 MUS123R
MUS323R Chamber Music III 2 MUS223R
MUS423R Chamber Music IV 2 MUS323R
   Recitals (0 cr)
MUS351 Junior Recital 0 Junior standing
MUS451 Senior Recital 0 Senior standing
   Musicianship Courses (14 cr)
MUS001R Concert Attendance I 0 None
MUS002R Concert Attendance II 0 MUS001R
MUS003R Concert Attendance III 0 MUS002R
MUS004R Concert Attendance IV 0 MUS003R
MUS124R Concert Practice I 1 None
MUS224R Concert Practice II 1 MUS124R
MUS324R Concert Practice III 1 MUS224R
MUS424R Concert Practice IV 1 MUS324R
MUS101A Ear Training A 1 Placement test
MUS101B Ear Training B 1 MUS101A
MUS201A Advanced Ear Training A 1 MUS101B
MUS201B Advanced Ear Training B 1 MUS201A
MUS125R Studio Piano I 2 None
MUS225R Studio Piano II 2 MUS125R
MUS325R Studio Piano III 2 MUS225R
   Music Theory (10 cr)
MUS111A Western Music Theory A 2 Placement test
MUS111B Western Music Theory B 2 MUS111A
MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A 2 MUS111B
MUS211B Advanced Western Music Theory B 2 MUS211A
MUS311 Form and Analysis 2 MUS211B
   Music History and Literature (13 cr)
MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) 1 None
MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval – Early Baroque) 2 MUS141
MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque – Classical) 2 MUS142
MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic – Contemporary) 2 MUS241
MUS244 Chinese Music I 2 None
MUS245 Chinese Music II 2 MUS244
MUS341 Orchestral Literature 2 None
   Capstone (4 cr)
Choose one of:
MUS450 Research Paper 4 Senior standing
MUS452 Senior Project 4 Senior standing
MUS455 Advanced Music Practicum IV 4 Senior standing

Major Requirements for Chinese Instruments

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Major Core for Chinese Instruments
   Applied Instrument (32 cr)
MUS122R Major Instrument I (Chinese) 8 None
MUS222R Major Instrument II (Chinese) 8 MUS122R
MUS322R Major Instrument III (Chinese) 8 MUS222R
MUS422R Major Instrument IV (Chinese) 8 MUS322R
   Ensemble (24 cr)
MUS120R Orchestra I 4 None
MUS220R Orchestra II 4 MUS120R
MUS320R Orchestra III 4 MUS220R
MUS420R Orchestra IV 4 MUS320R
MUS123R Chamber Music I 2 None
MUS223R Chamber Music II 2 MUS123R
MUS323R Chamber Music III 2 MUS223R
MUS423R Chamber Music IV 2 MUS323R
   Recitals (0 cr)
MUS351 Junior Recital 0 Junior standing
MUS451 Senior Recital 0 Senior standing
   Musicianship (14 cr)
MUS001R Concert Attendance I 0 None
MUS002R Concert Attendance II 0 MUS001R
MUS003R Concert Attendance III 0 MUS002R
MUS004R Concert Attendance IV 0 MUS003R
MUS124R Concert Practice I 1 None
MUS224R Concert Practice II 1 MUS124R
MUS324R Concert Practice III 1 MUS224R
MUS424R Concert Practice IV 1 MUS324R
MUS101A Ear Training A 1 Placement test
MUS101B Ear Training B 1 MUS101A
MUS201A Advanced Ear Training A 1 MUS101B
MUS201B Advanced Ear Training B 1 MUS201A
MUS102A Keyboard Skills A 1 Placement test
MUS102B Keyboard Skills B 1 MUS102A
MUS202A Advanced Keyboard Skills A 1 MUS102B
MUS202B Advanced Keyboard Skills B 1 MUS202A
MUS361 Chinese Music Seminar 2 MUS245
   Music Theory (10 cr)
MUS111A Western Music Theory A 2 Placement test
MUS111B Western Music Theory B 2 MUS111A
MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A 2 MUS111B
MUS211B Advanced Western Music Theory B 2 MUS211A
MUS311 Form and Analysis 2 MUS211B
   Music History and Literature (13 cr)
MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) 1 None
MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval – Early Baroque) 2 MUS141
MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque – Classical) 2 MUS142
MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic – Contemporary) 2 MUS241
MUS244 Chinese Music I 2 None
MUS245 Chinese Music II 2 MUS244
MUS345 Interpretation and Performance of East-West Music 2 MUS245
   Capstone (4 cr)
Choose one of:
MUS450 Research Paper 4 Senior standing
MUS452 Senior Project 4 Senior standing
MUS455 Advanced Music Practicum IV 4 Senior standing

General Education Core (29 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core. Students of the BM program in Performance (East-West Music) will, through their required major courses, fulfill the 5 credit requirement for Art & Aesthetics and 6 credit requirement for Humanities. This means students must take an additional 29 credits in Gen Ed courses from the LAS Department to complete the Gen Ed Core requirements.

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A 2 Art and Aesthetics
MUS211B Advanced Western Music Theory B 2 Art and Aesthetics
MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) 1 Art and Aesthetics
MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval – Early Baroque) 2 Humanities
MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque – Classical) 2 Humanities
MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic – Contemporary) 2 Humanities

Free Electives (9 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 9 credits in courses of their choice offered by the College.

Electives that are offered by the Music Department are provided in the table below.

Code Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
MUS125R Studio Piano I 1 Instructor consent
MUS225R Studio Piano II 1 Instructor consent
MUS325R Studio Piano III 1 Instructor consent
MUS425R Studio Piano IV 2 Instructor consent
MUS312 Orchestration 2
MUS326A Chinese Instrument Class A 1
MUS326B Chinese Instrument Class B 1
MUS155 Music Practicum I 3 Instructor consent
MUS255 Music Practicum II 3 Instructor consent
MUS355 Music Practicum III 3 Instructor consent
MUS350 Independent Study in Music 1–4 Instructor consent
MUS371 Internship 1–3 Instructor consent

12.8 BS in Biomedical Sciences

The program inculcates in students a perspective for the genuine well-being of each individual through a preventive, integrative, and holistic approach to biomedical science; combining state-of-the-art advances in western medicine with wisdom from time-honored traditions. In addition to providing a solid and systematic exposition of the fundamentals, the program enables students to acquire a broader perspective by offering diverse electives in data science and classical arts.

12.8.1 Program Purpose

The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences program seeks to provide a solid foundation and an excellent educational experience to prepare qualified and aspiring students for careers or advanced studies in the biomedical or related fields. The program also aims to help students become well-rounded individuals capable of sound moral judgment, advanced communication skills, familiar with cultural traditions of humanity, and possessive of habits and skills for lifelong learning.

12.8.2 Program Objectives

  1. Provide students with a solid foundation in the theories, methods, knowledge and application of modern biomedical sciences and related basic sciences; competency in collection, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of related scientific data; use of modern laboratory techniques; as well as a scientific literacy of contemporary biomedical sciences; and of future scientific developments.
  2. Equip students with the ability to combine and apply professional knowledge and skills in practical problem solving and decision-making related to modern biomedical sciences, along with a sense of teamwork, professional attitudes, and ethical judgment.
  3. Enable students to develop communication and critical thinking skills for life-long learning, the ability to appreciate the cultures, values and arts of all human traditions, and a respect for moral character.

12.8.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing this program, students should be able to:

  1. Apply the fundamental concepts in the core areas of biomedical sciences: biology, chemistry, physics, anatomy, physiology, biostatistics and public health.
  2. Demonstrate the appropriate didactic knowledge, critical thinking and communication skills needed to be competitive for acceptance into graduate and professional schools and/or for careers in the health care field.
  3. Apply proper methods for performing scientific research, a wide range of analytical and laboratory skills, a critical evaluation of the scientific literature as it applies to contemporary health care issues, while developing the initiative for and an awareness of the need for life-long learning.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the mind-body interaction and an appreciation for the impact that socioeconomic, racial, ethnic and spiritual factors have on the health and well-being of the individual.
  5. Demonstrate a differentiated understanding of ethical, moral and legal standards as well as recognize the dignity of the individual by building tolerance, compassion and cultural humility.

12.8.4 Program Concentrations

This program offers two concentrations: Integrative Health Sciences and General Sciences. It is the first in the State of New York that offers an Integrative Health Sciences concentration.

Integrative Health Sciences: the Integrative Health Sciences concentration offers courses in nutrition, kinesiology, epidemiology, naturopathy, traditional Chinese medicine, and other healing disciplines in addition to basic science courses related to biomedical science. Students will learn to examine each person as a unique biological entity in order to understand the underlying root causes of illness while striving for an optimum state of wellness.

General Sciences: The General Sciences concentration includes additional courses in biochemistry, microbiology, immunology, physics, and neuroscience. It offers a balanced approach to basic, applied, and clinical science in healthcare and prepares students for a wide range of advanced studies, including graduate research, medical school, dental school, veterinary school, pharmacy school and other health related professional schools.

12.8.5 Curriculum Overview

The curriculum for the BS in Biomedical Sciences is a 123-semester credit program with three major components: major requirements, general education core, and free electives.

BS in Biomedical Science Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 72
   Biology 15
   Chemistry 16
   Human Body and Health Science 8
   BMS Professionalism and Research 15
   Concentration courses, one of
     Integrative Health Sciences 18
     General Sciences 18
General Education 45
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses 40
   Additional Gen-Ed Courses 5
Free Electives 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 123

12.8.6 Graduation Requirement

Students must complete all the required credits in the Major Requirements, General Education Core and Free Electives with a minimum GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate. Students must also complete at least 61 courses designated as “LAS” or Liberal Arts and Science in accordance with New York State regulations.

12.8.7 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (72 credits)

The major requirements are comprised of basic science courses in biology, chemistry, as well as human body and health science, courses required for one of two concentrations, and courses in professional experience and research.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Biology (15 cr)
BSC101 General Biology I 3 None
BSC101L General Biology I Lab 1 None
BSC102 General Biology II 3 BSC101
BSC102L General Biology II Lab 1 BSC101L
BSC215 Cell & Molecular Biology 3 BSC102
BSC215L Cell & Molecular Biology Lab 1 BSC102L
BSC213 Introduction to Microbiology and Lab 3 BSC102
Chemistry (16 cr)
CHM101 General Chemistry I 3 None
CHM101L General Chemistry I Lab 1 None
CHM102 General Chemistry II 3 CHM101
CHM102L General Chemistry II Lab 1 CHM101L
CHM211 Organic Chemistry I 3 CHM102
CHM211L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 CHM102L
CHM212 Organic Chemistry II 3 CHM211
CHM212L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 CHM211L
Human Body and Health Science (8 cr)
BSC211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3 BSC102
BSC211L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1 BSC102L
BSC212 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3 BSC211
BSC212L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1 BSC211L
BMS Professionalism and Research (15 cr)
BMS101 Introduction to Biomedical Science 1 None
BMS102 Medical Terminology 2 None
BMS103 Medical Ethics 2 None
BMS346 Biomedical Science Literature 2 BSC212 and BSC215
BMS451 Biomedical Science Practicum I 4 BMS346, 80 cr
BMS452 Biomedical Science Practicum II 4 BMS346, 80 cr
Concentration: Choose one of
   Concentration - General Science (18 cr)
BSC221 Human Genetics and Genomics 3 BSC102
BSC335 Introduction to Immunology 3 BSC212
BSC321 Biochemistry* 3 CHM211
     Select any 9 credits from the following
PHY101/101L General Physics I and Lab* 4 MAT101 or beyond
PHY102/102L General Physics II and Lab* 4 PHY101
MAT105 Calculus I* 4 None
BSC331 Introduction to Neuroscience 3 BSC212
BMS301 Introduction to Human Pathology 3 BSC212
BMS302 Introduction to Pharmacology 3 CHM212
BMS235 Life Span Developmental Psychology 3 BMS135
BMS141 Introduction to US Healthcare 3 None
BMS231 Public Health & Epidemiology 3 SAT101
BSC332 Developmental Biology 3 BSC215
BSC333 Introduction to Bioinformatics 3 BSC221
BMS323 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Sciences 3 BSC212 and 212L
BMS351 Biomedical Science Internship 3 Permission form
   Concentration - Integrated Health Science (18 cr)
BMS232 Introduction to Naturopathy I 3 BMS132 and BSC212
BMS241 Chinese Medicine Theories and Principles I 3 None
BMS341 Kinesiology and Physical Fitness and Lab 3 BSC212
     Select any 9 credits from the following
BMS233 Introduction to Naturopathy II 3 BMS232
BMS242 Chinese Medicine Theories and Principles II 3 BSC241
BMS145 Healing Traditions Around the World 3 None
BMS331 Introduction to Homeopathy 3 BMS232
BMS332 Basics of Herbalism 3 BMS232
BMS333 Topics in Holistic Nutrition 3 BMS232
BMS351 Biomedical Science Internship 3 Permission form
Total Credits Required for Graduation 72

*Required by students aiming for medical school

General Education (45 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core. Biomedical Science students must take the following courses to fulfill the Scientific Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Writing and Rhetoric requirements.

Degree Specified Courses for the Gen Ed Core

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
BMS135 Introduction to Psychology 3 Scientific Reasoning
STA101 Introduction to Statistics 3 Quantitative Reasoning
ENG201 Technical Writing 3 Writing and Rhetoric

BS in Biomedical Science majors are required to take the following an additional Gen Ed courses.

Degree Required Additional Gen Ed Courses

Code Course Title Credits
BMS132 Nutrition, Health and Wellness 3
PHL132 Philosophical Perspectives II 1
PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III 1
Free Electives (6 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 6 credits of courses of their choice offered by the College.

12.9 BS in Data Science

Data science is an interdisciplinary field that applies principles of mathematics, statistics, and computer science to investigate large data sets and to extract useful knowledge from these data sets.

Today, data science is commonly applied to derive valuable insights from data in domains such as biotech, clinical trial, health care, insurance, pharmaceutical, energy, fraud detection, risk management, finance, credit scoring, marketing optimization, retail, internet, manufacturing, transportation, government, and climate change evaluation.

12.9.1 Program Purpose

The Bachelor of Science in Data Science program seeks to provide students with a solid foundation in data analysis and data management methods and skills, as well as experience in the practical applications of data science to prepare students for careers or advanced studies in data analysis or a related field.

12.9.2 Program Objectives

  1. Provide students with a solid foundation in the theories and methods of mathematics and statistics, computer science principles relating to data representation, retrieval, and programming, key technologies in data science, as well as the effective use of data analysis tools to practical applications.
  2. Equip students with hands-on experience and professional skills in practical data analysis, problem solving, and data driven decision-making.
  3. Enable students to develop critical thinking and communication skills, along with a sense of teamwork, professional attitudes, and ethical judgment.

12.9.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing this program, students should:

  1. demonstrate command of key concepts, methods, theories, and application in the core areas of data science: general statistical methods, regression, programming, and data management.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency with statistical analysis of data, develop the ability to build and assess data-based models, and execute statistical analyses with professional statistical software; develop relevant programming abilities and skill in data management.
  3. Develop practical skills and professional experience through experiences with practical and internships in a professional working environment to help students acquire practical employment skills.
  4. Develop cooperative and teamwork skills through projects; identify social, legal, and ethical issues in data science and apply a professional code of ethics relevant to the data science profession.

12.9.4 Program Concentration

The Department of Data Science currently offers the Bachelor of Science in Data Science program with two concentrations: Precision Health and Creative Industries.

Precision Health: Precision Health is an emerging field that takes a big data approach in an attempt to precisely identify individual needs and conditions to enhance health and wellness through disease prediction and prevention. It shifts the healthcare paradigm from the traditional “reactive” approach, where a person is treated after a disease is diagnosed, to a newer “proactive” approach where disease prediction and prevention are emphasized.

Creative Industries: Creative economy refers to industries in which the creative element is central to what is being produced, for example, advertising, film and television, broadcasting, publishing, architecture, design, music, visual arts, sports analysis, and performing arts. Data analysis has become essential in understanding consumer behavior, predicting consumption patterns, and deciding which productions will succeed in the creative economy.

12.9.5 Curriculum Overview

The BS in Data Science is a 120-semester credit curriculum with three major components: major requirements, core general education courses, and free electives.

BS in Data Science Curriculum

Area Credits
Major Requirements 69
   Mathematics and Statistics 27
   Computer Science 18
   Concentration courses, one of
     Precision Health 12
     Creative Industries 12
   Senior Synthesis and Career Development 4
   Major Electives 8
General Education 42
   College-wide Gen-Ed Courses
     *Including 3 cr provided by the major
40*
   Additional Gen-Ed Courses 5
Free Electives 9
Total Required Credits for Graduation 120

12.9.6 Graduation Requirement

Students must complete all the required credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 overall and across all the major courses in order to graduate.

12.9.7 Curriculum Details

Major Requirements (69 credits)

The major requirements are comprised of fundamental courses in mathematics, statistics, and computer science, concentration courses in either precision health or creative industries, as well as courses that enable students to develop professional experience and insights.

Required Major Courses BS in Data Science

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Mathematics and Statistics (27 cr)
MAT105 Calculus I 4 None
MAT103 Linear Algebra 4 None
MAT106 Calculus II 4 MAT105
STA101 Introduction to Statistics 3 None
STA205 Statistical Computing and Graphics 3 STA101
STA202 Introduction to Probability 3 STA101 & MAT106
STA211 Statistical Theory and Methods 3 STA202
STA311 Applied Regression Analysis 3 STA101 & MAT103
Computer Science (18 cr)
CIS102 Introduction to Computing 3 None
CIS105 Data Structure and Algorithms 3 CIS102
CIS221 Database Systems 3 CIS102
CIS331 Data Mining 3 CIS105 & STA101
CIS335 Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence 3 CIS105 & STA101
CIS341 Cloud Computing and Big Data 3 CIS102
Senior Synthesis and Career Development (4 cr)
DAS451 Senior Project 4 Department approval
Concentration: Choose one of
   Concentration - Precision Health Concentration (12 cr)
BMS231 Public Health & Epidemiology 3 STA101
BMS245 Introduction to Precision Health 3 None
DAS342 Health Data Analytics 3 STA101
STA341 Survival Analysis 3 STA211 or instruct. approval
   Concentration - Creative Industries Concentration (12 cr)
ECO211 Microeconomics 3 MAT105
BUS211 Marketing for Creative Industries 3 None
BUS213 Business Finance 3 ACC221
DAS341 Business Data Analysis 3 STA101
Major Electives (8 cr)
   Select from the following
STA335 Bayesian Analysis 3 STA211 or instruct. approval
STA321 Design and Analysis of Experiments 3 STA211 or instruct. approval
DAS321 Sample Survey and Customer Analytics 3 STA101
CIS121 Java Programming 3 None
CIS103 Web Development 3 None
CIS104 Essentials for Software Development in Data Science 3 None
CIS241 Practical Data Analytics Using Python 1 CIS102
CIS242 Computational Analysis and Practical Programming 1 MAT105, MAT103, STA101 & CIS102
DAS151A Real-time Data Analysis A 1 None
DAS151B Real-time Data Analysis B 1 DAS151A
DAS152A Applied Real-time Data Analysis A 1 DAS151B
DAS152B Applied Real-time Data Analysis B 0 DAS152A
DAS351 Data Science Internship 3 Permission form
DAS461 Directed Study: Career Development 2 Upon instruct. approval
MAT207 Calculus III 3 MAT106
STA331 Multivariate Analysis 3 STA211 or instruct. approval
STA345 Nonparametric Statistics 3 STA211 or instruct. approval
STA305 Advanced Statistical Computing and Graphics 3 STA211 & STA205 or instruct. approval
BSC333 Introduction to Bioinformatics 3 STA101
DAS345 Introduction to Computational Biology 3 BSC101 & STA101
BSC221 Human Genetics and Genomics 3 BSC101
ECO343 Health Economics 3 ECO101
BUS335 Pricing and Revenue Management 3 ECO101 & MAT105
MAT301 Mathematical Analysis (no longer available) 4 None
MAT311 Matrix Analysis 3 MAT103
STA371 Optimization 3 STA211 or instruct. approval
DAS455 Senior Practicum (no longer available) 4 Upon advisor approval
Total Credits Required for Graduation 69
General Education (42 credits)

All undergraduate students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of General Education (Gen Ed) Core. Data Science program course requirement STA101 fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning requirement for Data Science majors. However, all Data Science majors must take ECO101 to fulfill the Scientific Reasoning requirement.

Degree Specified Courses for the Gen Ed Core

Code Title Credits Gen Ed Area
STA101 Introduction to Statistics 3 Quantitative Reasoning
ECO101 Introduction to Economics 3 Scientific Reasoning

BS in Data Science majors are also required to take PHL132 and 232, and a natural science course as an additional Gen Ed requirement.

Degree Required Additional Gen Ed Courses

Code Course Title Cr
PHL132 Philosophical Perspectives II 1
PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III 1
   Select at least 3 cr from the following
BMS132 Nutrition, Health and Wellness 3
BSC100 Principles of Biology 3
BSC100L Principles of Biology Lab 1
CHM100 Principles of Chemistry 3
CHM100L Principles of Chemistry Lab 1
PHY101 General Physics I 3
PHY101L General Physics I Lab 1
Free Electives (9 credits)

Students are required to take an additional 9 credits of courses of their choice offered by the College.

12.10 Minors

Fei Tian College offers a range of minors for students who would like to add to their major of study. Minors must be in a different field than the student’s enrolled major, and all requirements for both the minor program and their major must be successfully completed in order for the minor to be awarded.

12.10.1 Arts Management

Students pursuing a non-Arts Management major have the option of also pursuing a minor in Arts Management, by complete a minimum of 18 credits as per the following curriculum.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Core Requirements (15 cr)
BUS121 Fundamentals of Arts Management 3 None
ACC221 Financial Accounting 3 None
MKT201 Principles of Marketing 3 None
ECO101 Principles of Economics 3 None
BUS213 Business Finance 3 ACC221
Electives (3cr)
   select from the following courses
BUS211 Marketing for Creative Industries 3 None
BUS312 Digital Marketing for Artists 3 None
AMG335 Fund Raising for the Arts 3 None
AMG334 Public Relations for the Arts 3 None
MGM331 Organizational Behavior 3 None
HRM301 Introduction to Human Resource Management 3 None
MGM432 Managing and Leading Organizations 3 Junior standing
BUS331 Arts and Entertainment Law 3 None
ECO211 Microeconomics 3 ECO101
ACC222 Managerial Accounting 3 ACC221
DAS341 Business Data Analysis 3 STA101
AMG431 Business Plan Development 3 MKT201 & ACC222

12.10.2 Biomedical Sciences

Students pursuing a non-Biomedical Sciences major have the option of also pursuing a minor in Biomedical Sciences, by complete a minimum of 18 credits as per the following curriculum.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Required (12 cr)
BSC211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3 BSC102 or BSC100
BSC211L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1 BSC102L or BSC100L
BSC212 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3 BSC211
BSC212L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1 BSC211L
BSC215 Cell & Molecular Biology 3 BSC102 or BSC100
BSC215L Cell & Molecular Biology Lab 1 BSC102L or BSC100L
Electives (6 cr)
   Select two courses from the following
BSC221 Human Genetics and Genomics 3 BSC102 or BSC100
BSC335 Introduction to Immunology 3 BSC212
BSC321 Biochemistry 3 CHM211
BSC331 Introduction to Neuroscience 3 BSC212
BSC302 Introduction to Pharmacology 3 CHM212
BMS301 Introduction to Human Pathology 3 BSC212
BSC213 Introduction to Microbiology and Lab 3 BSC102 or BSC100
BSC332 Developmental Biology 3 BSC215

12.10.3 Dance

Students pursuing a non-dance major have the option of also pursuing a minor in dance, by complete a minimum of 20 credits as per the following curriculum.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Dance Fundamentals (12 cr)
   select from the following
DAB101R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet I 6 None
DAB201R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet II 6 DAB101R
DAN101R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance I 6 None
DAN201R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance II 6 DAB101R
Dance Electives (8 cr)
   select from the following
DAN121R Introduction to Repertoire of Dance 2 None
DAN242G History of Dance: East and West 2 None
DAN104R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances I 2 None
DAN102R Shen Yun I 3 None
DAB221R Repertory and Rehearsal I: Ballet 3 DAN121R
DAN221R Repertory and Rehearsal I: Classical Chinese Dance 2 DAN121R
DAN132 Modern Dance 2 Instructor approval
DAB312A Choreography I: Classical Ballet 2
DAN312A Choreography I: Classical Chinese Dance 2 None
DAN311A Dance Pedagogy I 2 None
DAN141 Introduction to Performing 2 None

*Repeatable courses [R] receive only half of the listed credits per semester, but students must complete 2 semesters to receive the full credit.

12.10.4 Data Analytics

Students who are not pursuing a data science major, may earn a minor in Data Analytics. Candidates are required to meet requirement from his/her major program and complete a total of 18 credits in Data Science courses as required below.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Core Requirements (12 cr) 12
CIS102 Introduction to Computing 3 None
CIS221 Database Systems 3 CIS102
STA205 Statistical Computing and Graphics 3 STA101
STA331 Applied Regression Analysis 3 STA101 & MAT103
Electives (6 cr)
   Select two courses from the following
6
STA202 Introduction to Probability 3 STA101 & MAT106
STA211 Statistical Theory and Methods 3 STA202
STA305 Advanced Statistical Computing and Graphics 3 STA211 & STA205
STA321 Design and Analysis of Experiments 3 STA211
STA331 Multivariate Analysis 3 STA211
STA335 Bayesian Analysis 3 STA211
STA341 Survival Analysis 3 STA211
STA345 Nonparametric Statistics 3 STA211
STA371 Optimization 3 STA211
CIS105 Data Structure and Algorithms 3 CIS102
CIS331 Data Mining 3 CIS105 & STA101
CIS335 Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence 3 CIS105 & STA101
CIS341 Cloud Computing and Big Data 3 CIS102
DAS321 Sample Survey and Customer Analytics 3 STA101
DAS341 Business Data Analytics 3 STA101
DAS342 Health Data Analytics 3 STA101
DAS345 Introduction to Computational Biology 3 BSC101 & STA101
Total Credits Required 18

12.10.5 Oil Painting

Students pursuing a non-Fine Arts major have the option of also pursuing a minor in Oil Painting, by complete a minimum of 21 credits as per the following curriculum.

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Drawing Fundamental Skills and Training (10 cr)
ART107 Dynamic Composition 2 None
DRP101R Drawing I 4 None
DRP102 Painting 4 DRP101R
Oil Painting Skill and Techniques (6 cr)
   Choose 3 courses from either the following list or any ART, DRP course(s)
DRP103 Quick Sketch Techniques 2 None
ART103 Introduction to Sculpture 2 None
DRP203 Landscape Painting 2 DRP102
DRP202 Still Life Painting 2 DRP102
DRP321 Portrait Painting 2 DRP202,DRP203
DRP322 Half-length Portrait 2 DRP321
Composition (2 cr)
DRP310R Composition I 2 DRP204
Art History Requirement (3 cr)
   Select one of the following ARH courses
ARH101 Art History I 3 None
ARH102 Art History II 3 ARH101

12.10.6 Graphic Design

Students pursuing a non-Fine Arts major have the option of also pursuing a minor in Graphic Design, by complete a minimum of 20 credits as per the following curriculum.

Code Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Fundamental Skills and Training (4 cr)
DRP101 Drawing 4 None
Fundamental Design Skills (11 cr):
   Choose 4 courses from either the following list
DSG101 Design Studio I 3 None
DSG103 Typography Design I 3 None
DSG215 Design with Color 2 DSG101
DSG151 Image Making 3 None
DSG241 Brand Identity 3 DSG102
Art History (5 cr):
ART111 Visual Literacy I 2 None
ARH131 History of Graphic Design 3 None

13. Graduate Programs

Fei Tian’s Master’s degree programs are designed for students who have completed prior undergraduate studies and who are interested in advancing their knowledge, skills, and experience in their respective fields of the arts and sciences.

13.1 MFA in Classical Chinese Dance

Fei Tian’s MFA in Classical Chinese Dance is a terminal degree in the field of classical Chinese dance. This program is designed to produce new leaders and experts within the field through advanced multidisciplinary studies and research in choreography, theory, pedagogy, and professional performance. The degree qualifies its graduates to work in a variety of leadership capacities in academic, artistic, and professional settings.

Individuals admitted to the program are expected to have completed systematic undergraduate training in classical Chinese dance and to have amassed related professional performance and/or teaching experience with a high degree of artistic achievement.

13.1.1 Program Purpose

The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Dance program seeks to help professionally experienced dance artists who have been trained systematically at the undergraduate level in classical Chinese dance to acquire artistry, knowledge, and competency to become lead or principal dancers, managers, college faculty, researchers, or scholars so they can help preserve, promote, and facilitate cross-communications between Classical Chinese Dance in diverse cultural settings.

13.1.2 Program Objectives

  1. Enable students to develop advanced technical proficiency and artistry in classical Chinese dance for pursuing professional careers in performance, choreography, teaching, or administration.
  2. Enable students to gain the ability to create original choreographic works in classical Chinese dance both independently and in collaboration with others, as well as to conduct research in dance.
  3. Impart to students requisite knowledge and skills for teaching and explaining dance in its cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts through both verbal and written languages to audiences with diverse backgrounds.

13.1.3 Program Learning Outcomes

Upon completing the MFA program, students will:

  1. Artistry: Become refined dancers who infuse their artistic vision into their craft.
  2. Creation and Research: Develop the ability to engage in artistic creation and/or investigative research while synthesizing theory with practice.
  3. Knowledge and Communication: Become sufficiently knowledgeable and able to communicate effectively about Chinese dance knowledge in a variety of cross-cultural settings.

13.1.4 Curriculum Overview

The MFA in Dance is a 60-credit program that provides systematic training and advancement in Classical Chinese Dance as well as academic courses in pedagogy, history, theory, related cultural knowledge and research methodology. Students have the opportunity to take various elective courses in the areas of arts administration, performance, and practical professional experiences.

The table below presents the curriculum breakdown for the MFA.

MFA in Classical Chinese Dance Curriculum

Area Credits
Studio Core 22
   Techniques 16
   Repertoire 4
   Choreography 2
Academic Core 12
   Pedagogy 2
   History and Theory 3
   Research 2
   Culture, Music, and Dance 5
Electives 20
   Including a minimum of 10 credits of studio electives 10
Master’s Project 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 60

13.1.5 Graduation Requirement

Students must 1) complete all the required credits in the Studio Core Requirements, Academic Core Requirement, Free Electives, and the final Master’s Project with a minimum GPA of 3.30 as well as 2) fulfill the residency requirements, which is normally at least one year of full-time study. The residency requirement may be adjusted under special circumstances.

13.1.6 Curriculum Details

The following table lists the courses for the MFA in Dance Program.

Code Course Title Cr Prerequisite(s)
Studio Core (22 cr)
Techniques
CCD501R Graduate Classical Chinese Dance 16
Choreography
CCD511 Graduate Choreography I 2
Repertoire
CCD521R Chinese Dance Repertory I 4
Dance and Music
CCD502 Integration of Dance and Music 1
Academic Core (12 cr)
Pedagogy
CCD512 Advanced Pedagogy I 2
History and Theory
CCD541 Dance Throughout the Ages 3
Research
LAS551A Research Methodology in the Arts A 1
LAS551B Research Methodology in the Arts B 1
Dance and Culture
CCD541 Seminar: Dance in Cultural Context 2
CCD542 Topics in Dance Ethnography 2
Electives (20 cr)
Studio Electives (at least 10 cr), select from the following
CCD503 Acting for Stage 1
CCD555 Graduate Practicum 4
CCD551 Graduate Independent Study or Project 1–6
CCD601 Graduate Classical Chinese Dance Studio Practice 4
DAN502 Techniques of Other Dance Systems I 2
DAN602 Techniques of Other Dance Systems II 2
CCD611 Graduate Choreography II 2 CCD511
CCD621 Chinese Dance Repertory II 4 CCD611
CCD661 Graduate Internship 1–7
Academic Electives, select from the following
CCD612 Advanced Pedagogy II 2 CCD512
CCD571 Holistic Health for Artists 2
CCD671 Psychology in Dance Education 2
CCD631 Dance Kinesiology 2
CCD613 Perspectives on Dance Aesthetics 2
LAS522A Seminar in Performing Arts Management A 1.5
LAS522B Seminar in Performing Arts Management B 1.5
LAS581 Media Technology for the Arts 2
Master Projects (6 cr)
CCD750 Master’s Project 6
Total Credits Required for Graduation 60

13.2 MFA in Dance

The MFA in Dance program at Fei Tian College-Middletown provides students with a deeper understanding of the dance field. This rigorous program allows students to delve into the cultural, scientific, and technical aspects of dance, enabling them to make contributions to the dance field. It prepares MFA candidates for careers in higher education, as well as jobs in performance, choreography, or research.

13.2.1 Program Purpose

The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Dance program seeks to help professionally experienced dance artists who have been trained systematically at the undergraduate level either in Classical Chinese Dance or Classical Ballet to acquire artistry, knowledge, and competency to become lead or principal dancers, managers, college faculty, researchers, or scholars so they can help preserve, promote, and facilitate cross-communications between Classical Chinese Dance and Classical Ballet in diverse cultural settings.

13.2.2 Program Objectives

Goals of the program include:

  1. Refine students' technical proficiency and artistry in classical ballet or classical Chinese dance, for pursuing professional careers in performance, choreography, pedagogy, or administration.
  2. Enable students to create original choreographic works, both independently and in collaboration with others, as well as to conduct research in dance.
  3. Equip students with requisite knowledge and skills for teaching and explaining dance in its cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts through both verbal and written languages, to audiences of diverse backgrounds.

13.2.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing this program, students will:

  1. Maintain technical proficiency while refining one’s expression in Classical Ballet and/or Classical Chinese Dance.

  2. Develop further insight into movement range, processes and mechanics, and movement principles in Classical Ballet and/or Classical Chinese dance.

  3. Choreograph works that embody one’s own artistic philosophy, style, and intellectual insight.

  4. Resourcefully conduct research, and effectively utilize knowledge for investigative purposes and theoretical inquiry.

  5. Display extensive dance knowledge that encompasses the areas of history, theory, science, and education, and be able to describe their interrelation.

  6. Articulate and defend one’s theoretical understanding and artistic views through lucid oral and written discourse.

13.2.4 Curriculum Overview

The MFA in Dance is a 60-credit program that includes studio courses in advanced techniques, expanded repertories, and choreography for both Classical Chinese Dance and Classical Ballet; academic courses in pedagogy, history, and theory; related cultural knowledge; research methodology; and arts administration.

The table below presents the curriculum breakdown for the MFA. In addition to providing systematic training and advancement in Classical Chinese Dance and Classical Ballet, the MFA curriculum contains a required course on the integration of dance and music with an emphasis on practical professional experience.

MFA in Dance Curriculum

Area Credits
Studio Core 23
   Concentration courses, one of
     Classical Ballet 22
       Techniques 16
       Repertoire 4
       Choreography 2
     Classical Chinese Dance 22
       Techniques 16
       Repertoire 4
       Choreography 2
   Fei Tian Feature Course 1
Academic Core 11
   Pedagogy 2
   History and Theory 3
   Dance Science 2
   Research 2
   Fei Tian Feature Course 2
Electives 20
   Studio Electives 10
   Academic Electives 10
Master’s Project 6
Total Required Credits for Graduation 60

13.2.5 Graduation Requirement

Students must complete all the required credits in the Studio Core Requirements, Academic Core Requirement, Free Electives, and the final Master’s Project with a minimum GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate.

13.2.6 Curriculum Details

The following table lists the courses for the MFA in Dance Program.

Course List for MFA in Dance Program

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Studio Core (23 cr)
   Concentration: Choose one of
     Concentration - Classical Ballet (22 cr)
       Techniques
DAB501R Advanced Classical Ballet I 8
DAB601R Advanced Classical Ballet II 8 DAB 501R
       Choreography
DAB512 Graduate Choreography I: Classical Ballet 2
       Repertoire
DAB521R Repertory I: Classical Ballet 4
     Concentration - Classical Chinese Dance (22 cr) 22
       Techniques
DAN501R Advanced Classical Chinese Dance I 8
DAN601R Advanced Classical Chinese Dance II 8 DAN 501R
       Choreography
DAN512 Graduate Choreography I: Classical Chinese Dance 2
       Repertoire
DAN521R Repertory I: Classical Chinese Dance 4
Fei Tian Feature Course
DAN551 Integration of Dance and Music 1
Academic Core (11 cr)
   Pedagogy
DAN510 Advanced Pedagogy I 2
   History and Theory
DAN542 Dance Throughout the Ages 3
   Dance Science (choose one from)
DAN523 Holistic Health for Artists 2
DAN623 Dance Kinesiology 2
   Research
LAS550 Research Methodology in the Arts 2
   Fei Tian Feature Course
DAN561 Seminar: Dance in Cultural Context 2
Electives (20 cr)
   Studio Electives (at least 10 cr), select from the following
DAN 531 Acting for Stage 1
DAN532 Modern Dance 2 Instructor approval
DAN612 Graduate Choreography II: Classical Chinese Dance 2 DAN 512
DAN621R Repertory II: Classical Chinese Dance 4 DAN 521
DAB612 Graduate Choreography II: Ballet 2 DAB 512
DAB621R Repertory II: Ballet 4 DAB 521
DAN645 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Ballet I 2
DAN646 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Ballet II 2 DAN 645
DAN641 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Chinese Dance I 2
DAN642 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Chinese Dance II 2 DAN 641
DAN555 Graduate Practicum 4
DAN556 Independent Study or Project 1–6
DAN671 Internship 4
   Academic Electives (at least 10 cr), select from the following
DAN511 Advanced Pedagogy II 2 DAN 510
DAN611 Psychology in Dance Education 2
DAN563 Topics in Dance Ethnography 2
DAN663 Perspectives on Dance Aesthetics 2
LAS522 Seminar in Performing Arts Management 3
LAS570 Media Technology for the Arts 2
Master Projects (6 cr)
DAN650 Master’s Project 6 LAS 550
Total Credits Required for Graduation 60

13.3 MM in Performance

The Master of Music (MM) in Performance provides advanced studies in applied instrument and voice to students interested in advancing their musical knowledge, skills and experience in the professional performance of integrated classical Western and Chinese music. Graduates of the program are poised to pursue careers in performance, teaching, or seek more advanced studies in music.

Students admitted to the program are expected to have completed undergraduate studies in music performance and have amassed related professional performance or achieved a considerable degree of artistic achievement.

13.3.1 Program Purpose

The Master of Music (MM) in Performance program is designed for students with prior undergraduate training and performance experience in an applied instrument or voice studies who are interested in refining their musical craft through professional training.

13.3.2 Program Objectives

Goals of the program include:     

  1. Performance Excellence: Demonstrate advanced competencies and professional-level performing abilities in diverse ensembles in the primary instrument or voice.
  2. Advanced Musicianship: Develop a stylistic understanding and acquire the analytical skills, terminology, and repertoire for one’s primary instrument or voice within a variety of historical and aesthetic contexts.
  3. Music Scholarship with Cross-Cultural Awareness: Demonstrate a mastery of musical compositions integrating Western and Chinese musical components while having the ability to articulate an understanding of the cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts in both traditions.

13.3.3 Program Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate advanced competencies and professional level performing abilities in the primary instrument or voice.
  2. Demonstrate advanced knowledge in Western and Chinese music history, theory, styles and principals through different modes of inquiry.
  3. Be able to apply both Chinese and Western musical styles into one’s performance.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to perform in ensembles in a professional setting.

13.3.4 Curriculum Overview

The Master of Music in Performance is a 45–48 credit program contains coursework in applied instrument or voice, ensemble, and various supporting theory and history courses. Students will also have the opportunity to gain professional experiences during their studies.

The table below presents the curriculum breakdown for Western and Chinese instruments.

Area Credits
Major Instrument (Chinese and Western) Core 24
   Applied Instrument 16
   Ensemble 8
   Jury 0
Academic Core 15
   Theory 3
   History and Literature 9
   Music and Culture 3
Professional Experience 3
Electives 3
Graduate Recital 0
Total Required Credits for Graduation 45

The table below presents the curriculum breakdown for Voice.

Area Credits
Voice Core 24
   Major Voice 16
   Ensemble 4
   Piano 4
   Jury 0
Academic Core Requirements 18
   Theory 3
   Literature 6
   Methods 6
   Music and Culture 3
Professional Experience 3
Electives 3
Graduate Recital 0
Total Required Credits for Graduation 48

13.3.5 Graduation Requirements

Students must 1) complete all the required credits in the Studio Core, Academic Core, Professional Experience, and Free Electives with a minimum GPA of 3.30 as well as 2) fulfill the residency requirements, which is normally at least one year of full-time study. The residency requirement may be adjusted under special circumstances.

13.3.6 Curriculum Details

The following table lists the courses for the MM Program by specialization.

Major Requirements for Western Instruments (45 cr)

Code Course Title Cr Prerequisite(s)
Major Western Instrument Core (24 cr)
   Applied Instrument
MUS521R Graduate Major Instrument I (Western) 8
MUS621R Graduate Major Instrument II (Western) 8 MUS521R
   Ensemble
MUS520R Graduate Orchestra I 2 Non-piano major
MUS620R Graduate Orchestra II 2 MUS520R
MUS528R Graduate Instrumental Accompaniment I 1 Piano major
MUS628R Graduate Instrumental Accompaniment II 1 MUS528R
MUS529R Graduate Dance Class Accompaniment I 1 Piano major
MUS629R Graduate Dance Class Accompaniment II 1 MUS529R
MUS523R Graduate Chamber Music I 2
MUS623R Graduate Chamber Music II 2 MUS523R
   Jury
MUS550R Jury 0
Academic Core (15 cr)
   Theory
MUS510 Graduate Music Theory 3
   History and Literature
MUS513 Analysis of Great Works of Chinese Music 3
MUS540 Topics in Western Music History 3
MUS541 Graduate Orchestral Literature 3 Non-piano major
MUS544 Graduate Piano Literature 3 Piano major
   Music and Culture
MUS661 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Music 3
Professional Experience (3 cr)
Choose one of:
MUS555 Graduate Practicum 3 Instructor consent
MUS671 Graduate Internship 1–3 Instructor consent
LAS522A Seminar in Performing Arts Management A 1.5
LAS522B Seminar in Performing Arts Management B 1.5
Electives (3 cr)
Choose from:
DAN552 Graduate Independent Study in Music 1–4
Any 400-level or above course 3
Graduate Recital (0 cr)
MUS651 Graduate Recital 0 Instructor consent
Total Credits Required for Graduation 45

Major Requirements for Chinese Instruments (45 cr)

Code Course Title Cr Prerequisite(s)
Major Chinese Instrument Core (24 cr)
   Applied Instrument
MUS522R Graduate Major Instrument I (Chinese) 8
MUS622R Graduate Major Instrument II (Chinese) 8 MUS522R
   Ensemble
MUS520R Graduate Orchestra I 2
MUS620R Graduate Orchestra II 2 MUS520R
MUS523R Graduate Chamber Music I 2
MUS623R Graduate Chamber Music II 2 MUS523R
   Jury
MUS550R Jury 0
Academic Core (15 cr)
   Theory
MUS510 Graduate Music Theory 3
   History and Literature
MUS513 Analysis of Great Works of Chinese Music 3
MUS545 Topics in Chinese Music I 3
MUS645 Topics in Chinese Music II 3
   Music and Culture
MUS661 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Music 3
Professional Experience (3 cr)
Choose one of:
MUS555 Graduate Practicum 3 Instructor consent
MUS671 Graduate Internship 1–3 Instructor consent
LAS522A Seminar in Performing Arts Management A 1.5
LAS522B Seminar in Performing Arts Management B 1.5
Electives (3 cr)
Choose from:
DAN552 Graduate Independent Study in Music 1–4
Any 400-level or above course 3
Graduate Recital (0 cr)
MUS651 Graduate Recital 0 Instructor consent
Total Credits Required for Graduation 45

Major Requirements for Voice (45 cr)

Code Course Title Cr Prerequisite(s)
Major Voice Core (24 cr)
   Voice
MUS527R Graduate Voice I 8
MUS627R Graduate Voice II 8 MUS527R
   Ensemble
MUS526R Ensemble with Voice 4
   Piano
MUS525R Piano for Vocalists I 2
MUS625R Piano for Vocalists II 2 MUS525R
   Jury
MUS550R Jury 0
Academic Core (18 cr)
   Theory
MUS511 Graduate Music Theory for Vocalists 3
   Literature
MUS542 Vocal Literature – Analysis & Appreciation I 3
MUS642 Vocal Literature – Analysis & Appreciation II 3 MUS542
   Methods
MUS543 Vocal Methods from Around the World I 3
MUS643 Vocal Methods from Around the World II 3 MUS543
   Music and Culture
MUS661 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Music 3
Professional Experience (3 cr)
Choose one of:
MUS555 Graduate Practicum 3 Instructor consent
MUS671 Graduate Internship 1–3 Instructor consent
LAS522A Seminar in Performing Arts Management A 1.5
LAS522B Seminar in Performing Arts Management B 1.5
Electives (3 cr)
Choose from:
DAN552 Graduate Independent Study in Music 1–4
Any 400-level or above course 3
Graduate Recital (0 cr)
MUS651 Graduate Recital 0 Instructor consent
Total Credits Required for Graduation 45

13.4 MS in Data Science

The master program in Data Science is designed to provide a continuation of advanced topics in data science beyond the undergraduate curriculum. The program is intended for students who wish to obtain a systematic training in Data Science at an advanced level. It is also well suited for working professionals in the field who wish to engage in more in-depth study of data science.

13.4.1 Program Purpose

The Master of Science in Data Science program seeks to equip students with advanced theories and methods of data science, with the ability to apply their knowledge and methods to solve practical problems.

13.4.2 Program Objectives

Goals of the program include:

  1. To enable students to develop in-depth understanding of the key theories and technologies in data science, including, but not limited to statistical theory and methods, data mining, machine learning, visualization techniques, and predictive modeling.
  2. To enable students to gain fluency in statistical programming languages and big data tools through coursework, projects, and applied research.
  3. To equip students with the ability and professionalism to carry out problem analysis, solution finding and decision-making in the real world.

13.4.3 Program Learning Outcomes

After completing this program, students will:

  1. Have in-depth understanding of the key theories and methodologies in data science, with focus on the areas of statistics, data mining, and machine learning.
  2. Be proficient in statistical programming languages and big data tools through coursework, projects, and applied research.
  3. Be able to analyze problems and make data-driven decisions with professionalism in real world settings.

13.4.4 Curriculum Overview

The MS in Data Science is a 31-semester credit curriculum with three major components: core requirements, electives, and a capstone project.

MS in Data Science Curriculum

Area Credits
Core Requirements 15
   Statistical Methods 6
   Data Management and Visualization 3
   Machine Learning 6
Electives 12
Capstone 4
Total Required Credits for Graduation 31

13.4.5 Graduation Requirement

The academic requirements for graduation are the successful completion of the curriculum with a grade point average of no less than 3.0. In addition, a graduate must have taken at least 50% of all courses from Fei Tian College.

13.4.6 Curriculum Details

The following table lists the courses for the MS in Data Science Program.

Course List for MS in Data Science

Code Course Title Credits Prerequisite(s)
Core Requirements (15 cr)
STA401 Regression Analysis 3 None
DAS422 Exploratory Data Analysis and Visualization 3 None
STA411 Statistical Inference 3 None
CIS431 Modern Applied Statistical Learning 3 None
DAS441 Data Mining for Business 3 None
Electives (12 cr)
   Select four courses from the following
CIS543 Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing 3 CIS536
CIS441 Cloud Computing and Big Data 3 None
DAS421 Sample Survey and Customer Analytics 3 None
CIS536 Applied Machine Learning 3 CIS431
STA421 Design and Analysis of Experiments and Quality Control 3 None
STA441 Survival Analysis 3 STA411
STA531 Multivariate Analysis 3 STA411
STA535 Bayesian Analysis 3 STA411
STA545 Nonparametric Statistics 3 STA411
Capstone (4cr)
DAS561 Capstone Project 4 Dept. Approval
Total Credits Required for Graduation 31

14. Campuses

Located in beautiful Orange County, New York, Fei Tian College’s campuses in Middletown and Cuddebackville offer an environment that nurtures both artistic curiosity and scientific inquiry, all while fostering in students and the greater community the values of integrity, compassion, and resilience.

14.1 Middletown Campus

14.1.1 About the Middletown Campus

FTC Middletown sits on beautiful, sprawling Olmsted-designed grounds in one of the Hudson Valley’s up-and-coming cities, located an hour from New York City.

Established in 2018, FTC Middletown is building on the success of the College’s performing arts programs and offers programs in the performing arts, the visual arts, and the sciences.

14.1.2 Undergraduate Programs

Fei Tian College offers the following undergraduate programs at the Middletown campus:

  • BFA in Arts Management
  • BFA in Dance
  • BFA in Fine Arts and Design
  • BS in Biomedical Sciences
  • BS in Data Science

14.1.3 Graduate Programs

Fei Tian College offers the following graduate programs at the Middletown campus:

  • MFA in Dance
  • MS in Data Science

14.2 Cuddebackville Campus

14.2.1 About Cuddebackville Campus

Fei Tian College Cuddebackville Campus (FTC Cuddebackville) is an arts conservatory that is dedicated to the preservation, development, and promotion of traditional performing arts and culture.

Our arts programs take a holistic approach by training students to achieve advanced artistic skills while equipping them with the skills needed for life-long learning, which plays an invaluable role in informing their artistic sensibilities. Upon graduation, not only are students prepared for a career or advanced studies in the arts, they have a genuine appreciation for the culture and virtues of major world civilizations.

FTC Cuddebackville is situated on 30 acres of private grounds in the picturesque mountains of New York’s Lower Hudson Valley. The campus provides a stunning blend of classical Chinese architectural elements and state-of-the-art performance facilities.

14.2.2 Undergraduate Programs

Fei Tian College offers the following undergraduate programs at the Cuddebackville campus:

  • BFA in Classical Chinese Dance
  • BFA in Stage Production and Design
  • BM in Performance

14.2.3 Graduate Programs

Fei Tian College offers the following graduate programs at the Cuddebackville campus:

  • MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
  • MM in Performance

14.2.4 Performance Opportunities

Fei Tian College - Cuddebackville Campus - provides ample opportunities for students to perform before live audiences and work on professional productions. In addition to College-sponsored performance activities, FTC Cuddebackville also offers a variety of repertory, recital, production, orchestra, chamber, and practicum courses. These courses often culminate in public performances that either take place in one of the College’s performance spaces or at major venues both nationally and internationally, such as Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center Opera House, and Palais des Congrès de Paris.

14.2.5 Cuddebackville Campus Calendar

FTC Cuddebackville operates year-round with three sessions of at least 15 instructional weeks each. This calendar system affords students the opportunity to participate in intensive professional experience electives that the College offers. Full-time students are required to enroll in two sessions per year. Students may use the third session to take annual vacation or optional studies, including practicums and internships.

2022–2023 Academic Year
Summer 2022
Date Activity
April 13 (Wed) New student workshops begin
May 9–11 (Mon-Wed) Orientation
May 12 (Thu) Registration deadline; classes begin
May 13 (Fri) Falun Dafa Day
May 30 (Mon) Memorial Day
July 4 (Mon) Independence Day
July 24 - August 3 (Sun-Wed) Summer Break
September 2 (Fri) Classes end
Fall 2022
Date Activity
August 10 (Wed) New student workshops begin
September 5 (Mon) Labor Day
September 6–7 (Tue-Wed) Orientation
September 8 (Thu) Registration deadline; classes begin
September 10 (Sat) Mid-Autumn Festival
October 10 (Mon) Columbus Day
November 11 (Fri) Veterans Day
November 24 (Thu) Thanksgiving Day
December 23 (Fri) Classes end
Spring 2023
Date Activity
December 7 (Wed) New student workshops begin
January 1 (Sun) New Year’s Day
January 2–4 (Mon-Wed) Orientation
January 5 (Thu) Registration deadline; classes begin
January 16 (Mon) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
January 22 (Sun) Chinese New Year’s Day
February 20 (Mon) Presidents' Day
April 21 (Fri) Classes end
April 24 - May 5 (Mon-Fri) Extension classes
May 23–26 (Mon-Fri) Comprehensive examinations for degree candidates
2023–2024 Academic Year
Summer 2023
Date Activity
Apr 12 (Wed) New student workshops begin
May 10 (Wed-Fri) Orientation, registration deadline
May 13 (Sat) FLDF Day
May 15 (Mon) Classes begin
May 29 (Mon) Memorial Day
May 29 - Jun 11 Reserved for Summer Break
July 4 (Tues) Independence Day
Sept 2 (Sat) Classes end
Fall 2023
Date Activity
Aug 9 (Wed) New student workshops begin
Sept 4 (Mon) Labor Day
Sept 6 (Wed) Classes begin
Nov 23 (Thu) Thanksgiving
Dec 19 (Tue) Classes end
Spring 2024
Date Activity
Dec 6 (Wed) New student workshops begin
Jan 3 (Wed) Orientation and classes begin
Apr 16 (Tue) Classes end
Apr 17 (Wed) - May 4 (Sat) Extension classes (extension/makeup classes, etc.)
May 13–18 (Mon-Sat) Comprehensive exams for degree/diploma candidates

15. Course Descriptions

15.1 Course Numbering System

General Guidelines

FTC courses should start with a 3 Letter Prefix, followed by 3 Digit Course Identifier followed by an optional 1 letter suffix.

Examples:

BMS101 Introduction to Bio-medical Science

BMS101L Introduction to Bio-medical Science Lab

DAN101R Fundamental Dance, with repeating requirements

Prefix Convention

Prefix should identify the Subject of the course, such as general courses and courses uniquely offered under a Major, Concentration or a Specialty

Examples:

HUM Humanities

CHM Chemistry Subjects

ACC Accountancy Subjects

ART General Art courses for multiple disciplines/ programs

Prefix should not merely identify the department or the school who governs the course

The department has discretion over whether they would like to reserve the 3rd letter of the prefix to identify the type of course

Examples:

ARH Art History

ARF Art Fundamentals and Skills

Digit Conventions
First digits (1xx)

Conventionally identifies course level, difficulty or the year it is commonly studied

Undergraduate Course Leveling Convention

Number Level
0xx Orientation and basic No degree credit
1xx Introductory level (first year) Survey, foundation, and introductory courses, normally with no prerequisites and designed primarily for students with no prior background
2xx Intermediate level (sophomore/junior year) Normally designed for sophomores and above but in some cases open to freshman majors in the department
3xx Upper-intermediate level (junior year) Designed primarily as courses for juniors; prerequisites are normally required, and these courses are prerequisites for advanced courses
4xx Advanced level (senior year) Designed primarily for juniors and seniors; also includes specialized courses such as research, capstone, and thesis

Graduate Course Leveling Convention

Number Level
0xx Orientation and basic No degree credit
5xx First-level graduate Courses primarily for graduate students and qualified undergraduate students with permission
6xx Second-level graduate Generally for master’s and clinical doctorate only
7xx Third-level graduate Master’s- and doctoral-level courses; includes master’s thesis
800–899 Clinical/research/readings Includes comprehensive exam preparation
900–999 Doctoral research and dissertation
2nd Digits (x2x)

Conventionally further identifies course topics and depth, at the discretion of departments

Course Topic Convention (for all program levels)

Number Topics
x0x, x1x Introductory, fundamentals, principles or theories
x2x, x3x Prominent skills or tools, and important fields or subfields of specialization
x4x Broad background, knowledge, application, emerging fields, seminar courses
x48 ~ x49 Seminar courses
x5x Independent studies, directed studies, projects, thesis, capstones
x6x Internships, practicum, co-ops, capstones
x7x Breath: related fields
x8x, x9x Dissertation & Research
3rd Digits (xx3)

Sequence number of the courses, usually from 1 to 9, with 0 reserved for foundational courses.

Suffix Convention

A single letter suffix is used to give additional information about the course.

Suffix Letters
Letters Conventions
A, B, C Different parts of course sequence, where A usually stands for courses offered in the spring semester and B for courses in the fall semester
G General Education version of a course
L Lab courses
R Courses that must be repeated in order to satisfy graduation requirements
Suffix Digits

Conventionally placed at the end of the course code separated by a hyphen to identify Course Section Number when student enrollment requires different course sections (class times), e.g. -1, -2.

15.2 General Education Courses

College Core

LAS100 College Success (2 credits)

Designed to help students achieve greater success in college and in life. Topics include many proven strategies for creating greater academic, professional, and personal success, such as time management and note-taking skills. In addition, the information literacy skills students develop will not only prepare them for doing original research in college but also equip them for success in the 21st-century workplace.

ENG101 Effective English (3 credits)

Offers a highly structured approach to academic writing with a focus on the recursive nature of the writing process. Students read a variety of pieces by masters of the craft, engage in critical discussion, and write constantly throughout the course sequence. Assignments include several short response pieces as well as three to four major papers, ranging from process analysis to argumentation. This course is highly practical in nature and is meant to hone some of the skills most valuable to college success and career readiness. Prerequisite: Placement test.

CIV101 Western Civilization (3 credits)

Surveys the major achievements of Western civilization from its beginnings to the end of the Renaissance, with emphasis on developments in the visual and creative arts. An organizing theme of the course is the relationship between religious values and humanistic achievement. Multimedia and primary source readings feature prominently, both of which students will be expected to respond to in writing. Prerequisite: ENG101 or by instructor consent.

CIV102 Chinese Civilization (3 credits)

A survey of the salient features and legacies of Chinese civilization throughout China’s five millennia of history. Topics include literary, religious, and philosophical traditions; the transformation of China’s political, educational, and examination systems; and the radical cultural changes in the 20th century.

Humanities

HUM125 U.S. Society and Government (3 credits)

This course is a survey of the U.S. political system at the national level including treatment of the historical background, central concepts and revisions of the constitutional framework, examination of the presidency, congress, federal bureaucracy, judicial structure and process, political parties, interest groups, the media, and current public issues.

HUM204 Survey of Western Literature (3 credits)

A chronological survey of major authors in western literature since earliest times to the 19th century. Encompassing works in all major genres ranging from epics and tragedies to novels and poetry, the course provides opportunities for students to critically engage with literary texts, examining their ideological implications as well as aesthetic and stylistic characteristics. Prerequisite: ENG101.

HUM221 The Making of the Modern World (3 credits)

A survey of the political, cultural, and social history of Europe, America, and Asia from the Enlightenment (18th century) to the Cold War. Major topics include the French Revolution, Romanticism, nationalism, imperialism, revolutions and world wars, and the Cold War. Prerequisite: LAS110 and CLC131, or by instructor consent. Prerequisite: CIV101 or by instructor consent.

HUM222 Topics in Chinese History (3 credits)

An in-depth study of the Qin and Han dynasties, Tang and Song dynasties, or Ming and Qing dynasties. Topics include literary, religious, and philosophical traditions; major events and historical figures; royal families and their roles throughout history; and the transformation of China’s economic, political, and bureaucratic examination systems. Prerequisite: CIV102.

HUM231 Comparative Culture: China and West (3 credits)

A course that compares the most salient features of the Chinese and Western cultures in their major aspects, including geographical conditions, language and writing system, philosophical systems, government and political philosophy, law, international relations, war and military science, economic life, family and social structure, and art and literature. Prerequisite: CIV101 and CIV102 or by instructor consent.

MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval - Early Baroque) (2 credits)

This survey course of the history of Western music offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the Medieval until the Middle Baroque period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts during these periods of Western music history.

MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque - Classical) (2 credits)

This course offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the High Baroque to the Classical period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts of these periods of Western music history.

MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic - Contemporary) (2 credits)

This course offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the Romantic to the contemporary period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts of these periods of Western music history.

Writing and Rhetoric

ENG104 Public Speaking (3 credits)

A workshop-style course designed to help students become better communicators in their social and professional lives. Emphasis is on overcoming self-consciousness and developing clarity of thought and expression. Students examine real-life speeches, exploring the interplay of the many elements of oration and rhetoric, such as structure, diction, enunciation, eye contact, and body language. Students present informational, persuasive, and impromptu speeches throughout the course and also practice interview skills. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG201 Technical Writing (3 credits)

This course provides development of technical writing skills through writing technical content of different types associated with principles of reasoning, applied writing assignments, research, analytical reports that may include pictorial/statistical data, reading and interpreting technical and nontechnical material. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG205 Writing for Media (3 credits)

This course will explore various Mediums of Media and methods to approach writing for each one. This course covers the basics of news writing: news stories, feature stories, and opinion pieces. Students will practice writing for online as well as print publications and analyze scripts for film. Journalistic ethics and law will be discussed throughout the course as various issues arise. This course is writing-intensive and requires students to practice writing every day. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG221 Debate and Argumentation (3 credits)

This course seeks to equip students with a set of systematic strategies that increase their abilities to react critically and to form arguments in various fields. It helps students improve their communicative and public speaking skills through lectures, debates in class, critiques, evaluations, and watching and listening to others speak.

Quantitative Reasoning

MAT101 Mathematics in Applied Context (3 credits)

This course provides comprehensive coverage of essential topics in mathematics including: trigonometry; discrete mathematics; analytic geometry; algebra and elementary functions; and an introduction to calculus. The lessons develop mathematics using numerous examples, real-world applications, and an engaging narrative. Graphs, diagrams, and illustrations are used throughout to help students visualize concepts.

STA101 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)   

This course is an introductory course in statistics intended for students in a wide variety of areas of study. The goal is to teach basic knowledge in statistical concepts and establish understanding of basic statistical methods. Students will also learn simple R codes to execute those methods to gain experience in statistical computing.

MAT103 Linear Algebra (4 credits)

This is an introductory linear algebra course intended for students in science, engineering, and other related areas. Students will learn basic concepts and tools in linear algebra as well as practice writing numerical codes in Python to execute key algorithms such as Gaussian Elimination and LU factorization.

MAT104 Applied Calculus (3 credits)

This course is an introductory calculus course covering basic analytic geometry of graphs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integration and applications to biomedical science and other disciplines. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics (including trigonometry and logarithms) or a pre-calculus course.

MAT105 Calculus I (4 credits)

This course is the first part of the Calculus course covering topics such as limits, derivatives, and integration of single-variable functions. Application and execution of these mathematical tools to real-world problems with theoretical derivation or numerical coding is also introduced. This course is intended for students in science, engineering, economics, and computer science, among other disciplines.

MAT106 Calculus II (4 credits)

This course is the second part of the Calculus course covering topics such as advanced techniques of integration, polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, and multiple integrals. Application of these mathematical tools to real-world problems is also introduced. In addition, students will practice simple numerical coding to execute algorithms learned from the course. Prerequisite: MAT105.

Scientific Reasoning

ECO101 Principles of Economics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of concepts, theories, and analytical techniques of microeconomics. It focuses on the analysis of choices made by individual decision-making units (individuals, households, and firms). The use of a market, supply and demand, model will be the fundamental model in which trade-offs and choices will be considered through comparison of costs and benefits of actions. Production and market structure will be analyzed at the firm level. The role of government policy to address microeconomic market failures will be examined.

BMS132 Nutrition, Health and Wellness (3 credits)

Understanding nutrition is essential for lifelong health and wellness. This course will describe the anatomy and physiology of nutrient digestion, absorption, and utilization throughout all stages of human life. The various classes of nutrients, essential vitamins and minerals and their role in metabolism will be explored. This course will focus on teaching behavioral change and personal decision making so that students will be able to monitor, understand, and affect their own nutritional behaviors.

BMS135 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of psychology. Topics to be covered include: key figures in psychology, major psychological theories, examples of major research findings, data collection on the causes and correlates of behavior, and the use of psychological knowledge to improve the quality of our lives. This survey of psychology will acquaint the student with the major concepts and terminology of the discipline and provide a better understanding of self and others.

BSC100 Principles of Biology (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. Topics include characteristics of life, scientific method, basic cell chemistry and biochemistry, cellular and sub-cellular structure, transport across cell membranes, cell energy, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, patterns of inheritance, DNA & RNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, genetic mutation, evolution, microorganisms, plants and fungi, human transporting systems, human maintenance systems, human digestive system and nutrition, and ecology.

BSC100L Principles of Biology Lab (1 credit)

This course, in cooperation with the Principles of Biology lecture, is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. This course will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture.

CHM100 Principles of Chemistry (3 credits) Fall

This introductory course investigates the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include scientific measurement, states of matter, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction reactions, chemical bonding, nomenclature, gases, heat of formation of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics.

CHM100L Principles of Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

This course introduces laboratory exercises in physical and chemical properties of matter, with an introduction to both qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis. Topics include molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, acid-base chemistry, kinetics, and an introduction to spectrophotometric methods of analysis, and thermochemistry. The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials of CHM100.

PHY101 General Physics I (3 credits)

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence. It starts with mechanics, which includes the study of linear, circular and rotational motion, how to apply Newton’s laws and the concepts of energy and momentum. It also covers thermodynamics including temperature, heat transfer, and changes in state and ends with the analysis of the sinusoidal nature of simple harmonic motion.

PHY101L General Physics I Lab (1 credit)

A hands-on physics lab that covers the fundamental principles of physics including measurement, motion, work and thermodynamics with emphasis on problem solving. Experiments have been selected to reinforce the material presented in Physics 101, which should be taken concurrently.

LAS334 Topics in Liberal Arts and Sciences (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary seminar course designed to reinforce students' critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and quantitative skills. Students engage in intensive reading of texts and journal articles on selected topics in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences and also apply mathematical concepts and modeling to real-world scenarios. Through extensive discussion and writing of analytical responses, students hone their ability to detect underlying assumptions, evaluate the validity of arguments and experimental design, and express their viewpoints with clarity and precision. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Art and Aesthetics

ARH101 Art History I (3 credits)

This course covers the history of art and architecture in both Western and non-Western cultures from Paleolithic to the Early Renaissance.

ARH102 Art History II (3 credits)

This course builds on ARH101 Art History I and covers the history of art and architecture in the West from the Early Renaissance (approximately 1500 CE) to the Late Realism (Early 1900s) periods.

ART111 Visual Literacy I (2 credits)

This course covers the principles, elements, and foundations of design and the formal aspects of visual composition through readings, discussions, exercises, and laboratory applications. This is a visual design theory course that introduces the core concepts of visual design — visual elements, principles of design and creative process. Composition issues and strategies are explored through examples, exercises, critiques and creative projects.

ARH131 History of Graphic Design (3 credits)

This course explores the history of graphic design from the earliest communication technologies to the present, with a focus on the Modern era. It will examine changes in style and technology within the field and consider the relationship between graphic design and its cultural, political, and social contexts.

DAN242 History of Dance: East and West (2 credits)

This is a survey of the development of the major dance traditions of the East and the West. It examines the origins of the dance traditions and major milestones while reflecting on the philosophical and aesthetic underpinnings of the different dance forms.

CCD341 History of Classical Chinese Dance (3 credits)

This is a survey of the development of classical Chinese dance. It examines the origins of the dance tradition and major milestones while reflecting on the philosophical and aesthetic underpinnings of the different dance forms.

CCD412A Advanced Choreography A (2 credits)

This course focuses on choreographing in the styles of the different ethnic dance traditions in China. There will be in-depth study of the cultural characteristics of the ethnic dances. Both English and Chinese will be used in the instruction.

MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) (1 credit)

This overview course provides students the tools to understand the different music periods through history and familiarize students with the main composers, music literature, and genres.

MUS211A/B Advanced Western Music Theory A/B (2 credits each)

In addition to the study of more advanced harmonic progressions, this course sequence focuses on the function each harmony and melody expresses as well as the relation to the larger form at hand. Included in the study of larger forms are ternary, rondo, and sonata forms. Phrase structure and small forms are addressed in depth from melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic perspectives. The course also consolidates students' knowledge of 19th-century chromatic harmony while introducing 18th-century imitative counterpoint and 20th-century harmony. Prerequisite: MUS111B for MUS211A, MUS211A for MUS211B.

MUS204 History of Music (3 credits)

A browse of western music and its evolution from the middle-age period to the early romantic era, covering important composers and significant historic events during those times. Upon completion of this course the students will be able to gain perspectives in fundamental western music history through the middle-age to 19th century (divided by three periods: the middle-age, the renaissance, and baroque up to classical and early romantic periods) and draw conclusions through informed historic facts and personal interpretations.

MUS243 History of Chinese Music (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic history of Chinese Music that will form a foundation of Chinese Music knowledge for more advanced learning both in music and dance fields.

SPD101 Fundamentals of Stagecraft and Production (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic elements and principles of theater production. Topics include set, lighting, and sound design, production safety, and basic concepts of stage management. Course activities include lectures, tests, and a final exam.

SPD140 Introduction to Theater History and Practices (3 credits)

This course surveys the fundamental elements of theater, including acting techniques, the roles of the director and producer, and stage and costume design. It also gives students a sweeping historical tour of theater, from ancient Greece to Medieval Europe and from the Yuan Dynasty in China to the European Renaissance and the present. Through reading/watching plays and writing critiques, students will gain a better understanding of and appreciation for the traditions behind any theatrical performance they may attend.

Values and Ethics

PHL101 Moral Awareness and Spiritual Practice (1 credit)

This seminar course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts of the spiritual practice of Falun Dafa as well as of the major world traditions, such as Buddhism, Taoism, and Christianity, thereby reinforcing awareness of the universal values that have informed humankind’s moral life for thousands of years. Through seminars, readings, and discussion, students are guided to build a solid foundation for righteous belief and ethical conduct. They will also have a chance to engage various moral issues and ethical questions in an introspective and reflexive manner.

PHL130 Philosophical Perspectives I (1 credit)

This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the field of philosophy and ethics, acquaint students with the terminology and major concepts of the disciplines and provide students with a deeper understanding of different philosophical and ethical viewpoints. The course aims to help students gain a better understanding of oneself, life and the universe. The part I will cover different philosophies and schools of thought throughout history with a focus on Western Perspectives.

PHL131 Philosophical Perspectives II (1 credit)

Part II will focus on different philosophies and schools of thought throughout the history of China.

PHL231 Philosophical Perspectives III (1 credit)

Part III will engage critical thinking, debate and argumentation on a survey of philosophical topics in connection with today’s world. Prerequisite: PHL130 and PHL131.

World Language and Literature

CLC101, 102 Beginning Chinese I, II (4)

Beginning Chinese is designed for non-heritage Chinese speakers. Through interactive classroom activities and practice, students will acquire fundamental knowledge of the Chinese language and develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Upon completion of these courses, students should be capable of basic communication in a Mandarin-speaking environment. Students are also expected to have an active reading and speaking vocabulary of 400 Chinese characters. Prerequisite: None for CLC101, CLC101 or placement test for CLC102.

CLC111, 112 Elementary Chinese I, II (4)

Designed as an introductory course sequence for heritage speakers as well as for learners who have completed CLC102 or the equivalent. Building upon the students' oral/aural abilities, these courses develop students' competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Mandarin Chinese, with special emphasis on reading and speaking. By the end of these courses, students are expected to apply in daily use an active vocabulary of 800 Chinese characters, have a good command of basic idiomatic expressions and sentence patterns, be able to converse with ease on familiar topics, and be able to write short narratives and personal communications. Prerequisite: CLC102 or placement test for CLC111, CLC111 or placement test for CLC112.

CLC211, 212 Intermediate Chinese I, II (4)

Holistically develops students' reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the Chinese language at the intermediate level. Students are expected to have an active vocabulary of 1,600 of the most commonly used Chinese characters, including 200 idioms and phrases; be able to read expository and narrative writings with familiar vocabulary; have the speaking skills to cope with unfamiliar real-life situations; be able to write straightforward narrations and descriptions; and demonstrate a detailed understanding of Chinese culture and society. Prerequisite: CLC112 or placement test for CLC211, CLC211 or placement test for CLC212.

CLC311, 312 Advanced Chinese I, II (4)

Further develops listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese, with an emphasis on vocabulary building and developing lifelong reading habits. Students explore various ways to acquire vocabulary while gaining relevant cultural knowledge. They also study representative authentic articles in modern Chinese from various genres and develop the ability to use different reading strategies for different purposes. Furthermore, students are exposed to opportunities to summarize, explain, and persuade through effective writing. Multimedia and online resources are used extensively. Prerequisite: CLC212 or placement test for CLC311, CLC311 or placement test for CLC312.

15.3 Arts Management Courses

ACC221 Financial Accounting (3 credits) Fall

This course provides an introduction to financial accounting as the “language of business.” It emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of accounting information from the perspective of both stakeholders and managers in the processes of planning, decision-making, and control.

ACC222 Managerial Accounting (3 credits) Spring

This course provides students with an understanding of how institutions use accounting information to manage day-to-day operations in order to compete, sustain and grow.

AMG334 Public Relations for the Arts (3 credits) Fall

This course covers the basic concepts, theories, and practices of public relations, with a focus on how public relations operate in art organizations.

AMG335 Fund Raising for the Arts (3 credits) Spring

This course introduces the principles and methods of raising funds for nonprofit arts organizations from individuals, business, government agencies and foundations. Students will learn how to identify potential sources, position the organization for fundraising, and develop effective strategies for acquiring funds.

AMG431 Business Plan Development (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces common key aspects of creating a solid business plan. Students will have the opportunity to apply their business management knowledge and skills gained from the program of Arts Management to a practical business plan.

AMG351 Arts Management Internship (2–3 credits) Spring

Internships provide entry-level, off-campus career-related experience. Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. This course provides students with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to their program of study. Through course assignments and workplace tasks and projects the student will apply, connect, and extend in-class academic theory and skills for a professional development.

AMG455 Senior Project (4 credits) Spring

This course is for senior students. During this course, students will be presenting their best work through a senior project that showcases all the techniques and experience gained from the studies of the arts management program.

AMG459 Arts Management Practicum (4 credits) Spring

Arts Management Practicum is designed to give senior students the experience of faculty-supervised practical applications of previously studied knowledge and skills.

AMG469 Arts Management Internship (4 credits) Spring

Arts Management Internship is designed for senior students to gain professional experiences of applying previously studied knowledge and skills at an off-campus workplace.

ENG221 Debate and Argumentation (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course seeks to equip students with a set of systematic strategies that increase their abilities to react critically and to form arguments in various fields. It helps students improve their communicative and public speaking skills through lectures, debates in class, critiques, evaluations, and watching and listening to others speak.

HRM301 Introduction to Human Resource Management (3 credits) Fall

The course covers the techniques, policies, processes, strategies, and practices in the field of human resource management (HRM). It aims to help students understand the role of HRM in an organization as well as how it contributes to the organization’s effectiveness.

MGM331 Organizational Behavior (3 credits) Spring

This course introduces the concepts, theories, and practices of the field of organizational behavior (OB).

MGM432 Managing and Leading Organizations (3 credits) Fall

This course provides theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary for managing and leading organizations.

MKT201 Principles of Marketing (3 credits ) Fall Spring

This course covers the basic concepts, theories, and principles of marketing. More specifically, it covers marketing functions, trade channels, price policies, expenses and profits of intermediaries, and public policies with respect to marketing practices.

MUS101A Ear Training A (1 credit)

This course solidifies students' understanding of theoretical principles through aural exercises such as sight singing, rhythmic exercises, and dictation.

MUS101B Ear Training B (1 credit)

This course, through aural exercises such as sight singing, rhythmic exercises, and dictation, reinforces students' understanding of theoretical principles covered in MUS 111B. Prerequisite: MUS 101A; or by instructor consent.

MUS102A Keyboard Skills I (1 credit)

This course offers piano lessons in a group setting. Students will develop the ability to read music and play simple pieces with proper technique while relating the music to theory that they have learned.

MUS102B Keyboard Skills II (1 credit)

This course focuses on the development of keyboard musicianship, including basic pianistic facility and ease at the keyboard, sight-reading and harmonization in treble and bass clefs, basic music theory, and ensemble playing. Prerequisite: MUS 102A; or by instructor consent.

MUS111A Western Music Theory A (2 credits)

This course introduces students to the basic theoretical elements and concepts in the Western musical system, including intervals, scales, key signatures, triads, rhythm, and meter.

MUS111B Western Music Theory B (2 credits)

A continuation of MUS111A, this course focuses on the dominant seventh chord, the leading-tone chord, secondary dominants, and their use in common-tone modulations. Prerequisite: MUS111A; or by instructor consent.

MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A (2 credits) Fall

In addition to more advanced harmonic progressions, this course focuses on the small structural designs in music, such as binary form, ternary form, and strophic form. Prerequisite: MUS111B; or by instructor consent.

MUS211B Advanced Western Music Theory B (2 credits) Spring

This course consolidates students' knowledge of nineteenth-century chromatic harmony while introducing eighteenth-century imitative counterpoint. Prerequisite: MUS 211A; or by instructor consent.

MUS240A History of Western Music A (2 credits) Fall

This is a survey of the history of Western classical music from Classical Antiquity to the end of the Baroque period (c.1750). It discusses the social-cultural milieu, stylistic features, representative genres, and major composers of each period. Prerequisite: by instructor consent.

MUS240B History of Western Music B (2 credits) Spring

This is a survey of the history of Western classical music from the beginning of the Classical period to the 1950s. It discusses the social-cultural milieu, stylistic features, representative genres, and major composers of each period. Prerequisite: MUS240A; or by instructor consent.

MUS242G History of Music (3 credits) Fall Spring

Music is an intrinsic part of everyday life, heard everywhere, yet the history of its development from single notes to multi-layered orchestration can seem bewilderingly complex. Music provides entertainment and emotional release. It accompanies activities ranging from dance to religious ceremonies. This course will introduce students to the basic elements of music and review musical styles across the ages. The discussion of each musical time period will be accompanied by listening and discussion sessions.

ECO101 Principles of Economics (3 credits) Fall

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of economics, including both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The part about microeconomics includes the concepts of scarcity and opportunity cost, consumer and producer behaviors, market structures, market failures, government roles and government failures, welfare, exchange, and comparative advantages. While in the part about macroeconomics, students will learn measures of national income, income growth and inequality, unemployment, inflation, money supply, banking and financial institutions, and fiscal policy.

ECO211 Microeconomics (3 credits) Fall

This course is an intermediate course on Microeconomics. It introduces the optimization methodology for how society addresses the economic problem of resource scarcity and its efficient allocation. In addition, the course explores what happens to the market when the government tries to play a role in the distribution of resources. Throughout the course students will study how households and firms make choices so as to best allocate the resources available to them in various structures of market. Prerequisite: ECO101

BUS211 Marketing in Creative Industries (3 credits)

This course introduces the concept of creative industries and its main characteristics as opposed to non-creative industries. By reviewing current marketing studies of creative industries, this course introduces a general managerial model whose fundamentals are value, experience, and creativity. It further analyzes custom experiences, the process of product value creation and delivery, the business side of marketing as well as the management of the multi-media and multi-channel marketing in today’s environment. Lastly, the organizational issues such as property rights and ethical law are discussed.

BUS311 Business Finance (3 credits) Spring

This course attempts to develop a framework which will provide students with an overview of financial systems, and the main concepts and principles of investments. Students who master the course material will acquire the analytical tools and financial theory necessary for making good investment decisions and understand the paradigms by which financial securities are valued from the perspective of a portfolio manager. This course can also serve as a preparation course for students interested in taking the CFA or FRM tests in the near future. Prerequisite: ECO211

BUS335 Pricing and Revenue Management (3 credits) Fall

This course provides an introduction to both the theory and the practice of revenue management and pricing; the course develops a set of methodologies that students can use to identify and develop opportunities for revenue optimization in different business contexts including show business, media, health care, transportation, and hospitality industries, etc. The course places particular emphasis on discussing quantitative data-driven models and their implementations. Prerequisite: ECO101 & MAT103

BUS121 Fundamentals of Arts Administration (3 credits) Fall

This survey course explores the theories, processes, and practices behind strategic planning and decision-making in arts organizations today. Practical applications will focus on developing concrete strategies and plans for managing arts organizations, including business plans, managing boards, fund-raising, human resources, facilities, and program development.

BUS225 Finance for the Arts (3 credits) Fall

This course will present basic concepts of budgeting and the use of standard financial reports as essential financial management. This course is arranged to de-mystify basic financial management and raise student’s level of comfort with the concepts and decision making. We will discuss ways of promoting fiscal responsibility and practices throughout an organization, including understanding of roles and responsibilities of different positions within an organization.   

MKT321 Digital Marketing (3 credits) Fall

This course explores the dynamic, interactive and ever evolving field of Internet/Digital marketing. Particular attention will be given to examining Internet marketing models, understanding consumer online behavior, designing effective online content, and implementing interactive marketing campaigns. The course will combine theory and practice in an interactive environment. Class work will be supplemented by real world exercises and guest lectures from experienced practitioners.

BUS331 Arts and Entertainment Law (3 credits) Spring

This course is a practical examination of the legal rights and responsibilities of artists, (intellectual property, contracts, insurance). The course is an introductory view of an area of law that involves numerous disciplines, which protect, regulate, and facilitate the creation, use and marketing of arts.

15.4 Biomedical Sciences Courses

BMS101 Introduction to Biomedical Science (1 credit) Fall

This course provides an overview of topics in the biomedical sciences. This course introduces the student to various pathways and career opportunities in biomedical sciences. The course also discusses the necessary steps in preparing for and applying to medical school and other postgraduate careers in professions related to the biomedical sciences.

BMS102 Medical Terminology (2 credits) Spring

This course introduces students to the language of medicine. Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical words, and medical terms associated with the body as a whole. Utilizing a systems-approach, the student will define, interpret, and pronounce medical terms relating to structure and function, pathology, diagnosis, clinical procedures, oncology, and pharmacology. In addition to medical terms, some of common abbreviations applicable to each system will be introduced.

BMS103 Biomedical Ethics (2 credits) Fall

The course will take a case-based approach to examining moral dilemmas you may encounter in research, medicine, and technology, and study ways of analyzing those dilemmas to make them more easily controlled. We will focus on examples in clinical medicine, research integrity, data, conflicts of interest, genetics, and others.

BMS141 Introduction to US Healthcare (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces the student to the dynamic and complex changes that have occurred in the US healthcare system. Each class session requires students to think critically and communicate in small as well as large group settings to discuss ways in which he or she can contribute to health-related industries.

BMS145 Healing Traditions Around the World (3 credits) Fall

This course will ‘journey’ to different cultures around the world, past and present, exploring their different concepts, methods and lifestyles for physical, emotional, and spiritual health and wellness.

BMS323 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science (3 credits) Spring

An Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science includes: quality control; laboratory math; laboratory safety; care and use of basic laboratory equipment; as well as laboratory settings, accreditation, and certification. Upon successful completion of this course the student will: demonstrate laboratory safety; perform laboratory math; and describe quality control. The student will demonstrate the correct use of basic laboratory equipment and be able to explain accreditation and certification processes. Prerequisite: BSC212 and BSC212L

BMS231 Public Health and Epidemiology (3 credits) Spring

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of epidemiological methods and understand the determinants and distribution of public health related events. The course will cover the history of epidemiology, types of epidemiological studies and methodology, data analysis for epidemiological purposes, and policy implications of epidemiological findings. The class will engage the students in active and collaborative learning through case studies, group discussions or individual presentations, and various types of assignments. Prerequisite: STA101

BMS232 Introduction to Naturopathy I (3 credits) Fall

Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary health care profession, emphasizing prevention, treatment, and optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and substances that encourage individuals' inherent self-healing ability. The practice of naturopathy includes modern and traditional, scientific, and empirical methods. Naturopathic practitioners recognize that nature is inherently wise and that abiding by its laws reinforces and sustains individual health and well-being. The information in this course combines traditional herbal wisdom with recent evidence-based research. These traditions include Western herbalism, energetics, homeopathy as well as traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic botanical medicine.. Prerequisite: BMS132 and BSC212.

BMS233 Introduction to Naturopathy II (3 credits) Fall

The second part of this course will go beyond the traditions and the emphasis is on contemporary research in phytochemistry and pharmacognosy. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS235 Life Span of Developmental Psychology (3 credits)

This is an introductory course that examines the development of individuals from conception to death. With each life stage, current and historical research and theoretical information will be presented related to socioemotional, physical, and cognitive development. Also covered will be the effect of cultural differences on human development, ethical issues related to development, and problems that occur during development.Prerequisite: BMS135

BMS241 Chinese Medicine Theories and Principles I (3 credits) Fall

Yin and yang, the five-phase theory, meridians, acupuncture, and the wisdom of medicinal and culinary herbs are the foundations of Chinese medicine. This course will explore all the elements that constitute the philosophy and practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

BMS242 Chinese Medicine Theories and Principles II (3 credits) Spring

Traditional Chinese Medicine II will expand further on the knowledge gained in the first course, specifically on TCM theory, meridian anatomy and energy flow, dysfunction in the human energetic system and the basics of acupuncture therapy. Prerequisite: BMS241

BMS301 Introduction of Pathology (3 credits)

Concepts of Altered Health States introduces the student to pathophysiology and disruptions in the normal body functioning in individuals across the lifespan. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from the environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptations are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. Prerequisite: BSC212

BMS302 Introduction of Pharmacology (3 credits)

Pharmacology is the study of how medicines work in health and disease in Humans and animals. Pharmacology is therefore the basis of therapeutics and of fundamental importance to medical sciences in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Optometry and other biomedical related disciplines including basic and clinical research. This is an introductory course to lay the foundation for understanding basic concepts in Pharmacology and the pharmacological basis of therapeutics. Prerequisite: CHM212

BMS331 Introduction of Homeopathy (3 credits)

The course is designed for students to learn the fundamentals of treating disease naturally and effectively It provides a solid grounding in the philosophy and fundamental principles governing the practice of this great art, along with studies of some primary remedies. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS332 Basics of Herbalism (3 credits)

This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the history and uses of herbs including basic methods of administration and therapeutic actions of each of the botanicals studied. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS333 Topics in Holistic Nutrition (3 credits)

Holistic nutrition is the foundation to any natural health lifestyle plan for optimal health. This course covers CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) topics in nutrition, such as “nutritionism” and the Western diet, detoxification, fasting and elimination and juice therapies, acid-alkaline balance, raw foods, and a detailed look at food labeling. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS341 Kinesiology and Physical Fitness and Lab (3 credits) Fall

Physical fitness is closely tied to optimal health and wellness. An understanding of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system in motion allows the student to grasp the concepts of physical training and fitness in preparation for either a career in physical therapy, fitness, or sport related fields as well as for the maintenance of life long fitness habits for themselves and their families. There will also be a laboratory practicum for this course. Prerequisite: BSC212

BMS346 Biomedical Sciences Literature (3 credits) Fall

This course focuses on developing the thinking skills associated with becoming critical consumers of research literature. Through these learning experiences, you will be able to identify key research concepts and utilize these research concepts to begin evaluating research articles more critically. These critical thinking competencies are directly applicable to your coursework and to each aspect of the research process that you will continue to encounter as you advance in your program of studies as well as your future biomedical career.. Prerequisite: BSC212 and BSC215

BMS351 Biomedical Science Internship (3 credits)

Internships provide entry-level, off-campus career-related experience. Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. This course provides students with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to their program of study. Through course assignments and workplace tasks and projects the student will apply, connect, and extend in-class academic theory and skills for a professional development. Prerequisite: department approval

BMS451 Biomedical Science Practicum I (4 credits) Fall

This practicum is part of the Senior Capstone Experience and will allow students to work with a qualified mentor who is either a faculty member or an off-campus supervisor for an individual project to gain practical and research experience in the field of biomedical sciences. It allows students to have a taste and some hands-on experience of activities in a potential future career, such as biomedical laboratory experiments, public health programs, health data analytics, precision health and medical clinic observership. Prerequisite: BMS346 and 80 cr

BMS452 Biomedical Science Practicum II (4 credits) Spring

The practicum project is the culminating product of the B.S. in biomedical sciences program. Students will gain practical experience that requires them to assimilate everything learned in the program. Based on individual interests, each student will work with a qualified mentor under mutual agreements to complete an individual project during the last two semesters of study to gain practical and research experience in biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: BMS346 and 80 cr

BSC101 General Biology I (3 credits) Fall

This is the first half of a one-year course designed for science majors. This course introduces the principles and concepts of contemporary biology, covering the chemical basis of biology, cell structure and function, genetics, and molecular biology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels.

BSC101L General Biology I Lab (1 credit) Fall

This course, in cooperation with the General Biology I Lecture, is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. This course will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture..

BSC102 General Biology II (3 credits) Spring

This is the second half of a one-year course designed for biomedical science major. It covers main topics on Biotechnology, Evolution, Plants, Animals and Ecology. Different from Gen Bio I focusing on the cellular and molecular level, Gen Bio II focuses on the organism level and beyond. It provides a broad foundation of life/body system of all kinds of species. 3. Prerequisite: BSC101

BSC102L General Biology II Lab (1 credit) Spring

This course, in cooperation with the General Biology II Lecture, will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture including the regulation of gene expression, biotechnology, evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, etc. Prerequisite: BSC101L

BSC211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3 credits) Fall

This is the first of two courses that will describe the structure and function of the human body. Topics will include anatomical terminology, the organizational structure of the body and how it maintains homeostasis. This course will discuss the structure and function of the integumentary system, the musculoskeletal system, the endocrine system, and nervous system, including the sensory organs. Students will also perform and complete a practical laboratory component to this course. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC211L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1 credit) Fall

This laboratory course is designed to promote learning through the development of the laboratory skills of observation, demonstration, and experimentation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the cell, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratory materials will include microscopic specimens, models, charts, illustrations, and sample analysis kits. Prerequisite: BSC102L

BSC212 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3 credits) Spring

This is the second of two courses that will describe the structure and function of the remainder of human body as well as how all elements of the body function together in an integrated fashion. This course will discuss the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, the gastrointestinal system, the respiratory system, as well as the urinary and reproductive systems. Students will also perform and complete a practical laboratory component to this course. Prerequisite: BSC211

BSC212L Human Anatomy and Physiology II lab (1 credit) Spring

This laboratory course is designed to promote learning through the development of the laboratory skills of observation, demonstration, and experimentation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Topics covered include, but are not limited to: blood and blood testing, the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory materials will include microscopic specimens, models, charts, illustrations, and sample analysis kits. Prerequisite: BSC211L

BSC213 Introduction to Microbiology and Lab (3 credits) Fall

Microorganisms in the context of this course includes bacteria, microscopic fungi (yeasts and molds), protozoan, microscopic algae, prions and viruses, but our particular focus is on Bacteria. The major themes of our lectures are general principles for growth, metabolism, classification, description of microbiological life forms, uses of microorganisms, and microorganisms in disease. The course will also examine the interactions of microbes with each other, hosts, and the environment. Laboratory activities will reinforce principles of microbiology, including structure, function, genetics, and phylogeny of microbes.. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC215 Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credits) Fall

This course is the advanced extension of General Biology. It will explore the molecular basis on the processes and mechanisms of the contral dogma, as well as the regulation of gene exression. Major cell structures and functions; such as cell signlaing, cell cycle, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, etc. will also be discussed.. Emphasis will be placed on eukaryotes. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC215L Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credits) Fall

This lab course will introduce topics on a variety of biotechnologies used to study molecular and cellular biology. Couple of experiments will give students some hands-on experience on basics of biomedical research. Prerequisite: BSC102L

BSC221 Human Genetics and Genomics (3 credits) Spring

This course will reinforce the basic concepts and principles of the genetics and how they apply to human biology and diseases, including the classic and extension of Mendelian Genetics, linkage and mapping, sex linked inheritance, genetic mutations, and epigenetics. The human genome sequence forms the cornerstone of contemporary human genetics. This course will discuss the field of genomics with a strong human disease perspective. How genome-based strategies are used for the detection, treatment, and prevention of human diseases. It will cover the architecture of human genome, genome variations, genome analysis, personal genomics, and cancer genomics. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC321 Biochemistry (3 credits) Fall

This is an introductory biochemistry course, emphasizing broad understanding of chemical and biological events happening in living systems. The course covers the biochemistry topics including the structure and functional relationship of biological molecules, including proteins, enzymes, carbo-hydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. In addition, this course provides an introduction to metabolic pathways and bioenergetics, including glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, etc.. Prerequisite: CHM211

BSC331 Introduction to Neuroscience (3 credits) Spring

Neuroscience – The study of structures and functions of nervous system. The lecture topic may include: The Structure of the Nervous System; Neurons and Glia; Neuronal Action Potential and Neuronal Membrane at Rest; Synaptic Transmission; Neurotransmitter Systems; Neuroplasticity; Sensory System; Motor System; Memory System; Language Processing; The Brain and Human Behavior, and the clinical correlations of neuroscience etc. Prerequisite: BSC212

BSC332 Developmental Biology (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the early development of organisms. The focus will be on the genes and proteins involved in controlling the behavior of cells in the processes of differentiation, morphogenesis, and growth. Developmental mechanisms and processes will be examined in genetic model organisms such as the fruit fly and the worm as well as in vertebrates such as the frog, chicken, mouse, and humans. Prerequisite: BSC215

BSC333 Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 credits)

This course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and a working knowledge of the techniques employed in bioinformatics. Emphasis will be placed on biological sequence (DNA, RNA, protein) analysis and its applications. Prerequisite: BSC221

BSC335 Introduction to Immunology (3 credits) Fall

This course will explore the immune systems of vertebrates that enable them to recognize and respond specifically to foreign substances. The molecular and cellular basis of immunity will also be discussed. The roles of antigens, antibodies and immunocompetent cells in pathogenesis and immunity to infectious diseases will be covered. The applications of immunology in the design of vaccines, immunotherapeutics, immunodiagnostics, and organ transplantation will be briefly discussed, as will the uses of immunology in biological research. Prerequisite: BSC212

CHM101 General Chemistry I (3 credits) Fall

This course is a general chemistry which is the foundation for all advanced chemistry courses. This course covers the periodic table, atomic structure, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, and kinetics

CHM101L General Chemistry I Lab (1 credit) Fall

This course emphasizes the fundamental laboratory techniques related to atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding theories, thermochemistry, and states of matter (e.g., gases, liquids, and solids). The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials.

CHM102 General Chemistry II (3 credits) Spring

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. Prerequisite: CHM101

CHM102L General Chemistry II Lab (1 credit) Spring

This course emphasizes chemical equilibrium, rates of reaction, redox reactions, acid-base reactions, an outline of thermodynamics and electrochemistry. The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials. Prerequisite: CHM101L

CHM211 Organic Chemistry I (3 credits) Fall

This course is an introductory course in organic chemistry with an emphasis on the compounds of carbon, including nomenclature, reactions, and basic theoretical concepts of molecules from a standpoint of electronic structures and

energies. Prerequisite: CHM102

CHM211L Organic Chemistry I Lab (3 credits) Fall

This is the first course in organic laboratory practices. The course will require students to learn basic lab skills

including recrystallization, distillation, chromatography, and liquid-liquid extraction as well as how to set up simple reactions.. Prerequisite: CHM102L

CHM212 Organic Chemistry II (3 credits) Spring

This intermediate organic chemistry course focuses on the methods used to identify the structure of organic molecules, advanced principles of organic stereochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and methods used for the synthesis of organic compounds. Additional special topics include illustrating the role of organic chemistry in biology, medicine, and industry.. Prerequisite: CHM211

CHM212L Organic Chemistry II Lab (1 credit) Spring

This intermediate organic chemistry course focuses on the methods used to identify the structure of organic molecules, advanced principles of organic stereochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and methods used for the synthesis of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM211L

15.5 Classical Chinese Dance Courses

CCD101R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance I (5 credits)

This studio course reviews and refines the fundamental elements and poses of classical Chinese dance through short movement combinations so that students are able to grasp the Fei Tian stylistic requirements for classical Chinese dance. The course also studies the subtlety of body language for actualizing the aesthetics of classical Chinese dance and introduces students to the Fei Tian requirements for shen yun (bearing). Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD101R twice for a total of 10 credits.

CCD102R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances I (1 credit)

This course primarily focuses on Tibetan ethnic dance and hua-gu-deng (flower drum lantern) folk dance from eastern China, with an emphasis on rhythmic analysis. Students examine how the local customs and cultures inform the unique stylistic features of the dance forms. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD102R twice for a total of 2 credits.

CCD103R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance I (1 credit)

This studio course reviews and reinforces the jiqiao (difficult techniques) and tanzigong (tumbling) used in classical Chinese dance. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD103R twice for a total of 2 credits.

CCD104 Performing and Acting (2 credits)

This course develops students' appreciation and understanding of the art of acting with the purpose of strengthening their acting skills and expressive power in dance performances. May culminate in performance.

CCD105 Music for Dancers I (2 credits)

This course aims to develop and strengthen the basic musical and rhythmic skills vital to a student’s dance studies. Students will participate in various activities intended to strengthen their sense of rhythm, train their aural and conceptual skills in listening to and appreciating music, and translate their musical literacy to practical dance applications.

CCD155, 255, 355 Dance Practicum I, II, III (3 credits each)

These courses are designed to give students the opportunity to gain professional performing experience. Auditions may be required. Students selected will participate in performances with professional performance companies such as Shen Yun Performing Arts.

CCD201R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance II (5 credits)

Through the use of extended and increasingly difficult dance combinations, this studio course continues to condition students for classical Chinese dance. Emphasis is placed on the fluidity of transitions between poses and movement phrases. Studies in shen yun (bearing) focuses on refining motor skills of the hands and feet alongside use of breath and facial expression to maximize expressive power. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD201R twice for a total of 10 credits. Prerequisite: 10 credits of CCD101R or instructor consent.

CCD202R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances II (1 credit)

This course primarily focuses on Mongolian ethnic dance. Students examine the inseparable link between the traditional nomadic lifestyle of Mongolians and the fundamental elements of this dance form, including shoulder, arm, and wrist coordination as well as stylistic jumps that imitate riding on horseback. Dances may incorporate the use of props such as chopsticks, wine cups, and bowls, which symbolize the importance of hospitality to the Mongolian people. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD202R twice for a total of 2 credits. Prerequisite: 2 credits of CCD102R or instructor consent.

CCD203R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance II (1 credit)

A continuation of CCD103R, this studio course provides students an opportunity to further refine the quality of the jiqiao (difficult techniques) and tanzigong (tumbling) movements particular to classical Chinese dance. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD203R twice for a total of 2 credits. Prerequisite: 2 credits of CCD103R or instructor consent.

CCD205 Music for Dancers II (2 credits)

This course examines the connection between dance movements and music in the performance and choreography of Chinese dance, including how the shen yun (bearing) is affected. Students will study the music literature from various perspectives for the purpose of enhancing performance and choreographic techniques. Prerequisite: CCD105 or by instructor consent.

CCD221R Repertory & Rehearsal I (2 credits)

This course develops students' overall performance and rehearsal skills through studying, rehearsing, and participating in the dance production process with resident and guest artists. May culminate in performance. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD221R twice for a total of 4 credits.

CCD211 Mind, Body, and Dance (2 credits)

This course is a basic course for classical Chinese dance majors, based on the unique needs of classical Chinese dance training. It introduces both Eastern and Western concepts of the human body and explores the role of the mind in classical Chinese dance learning.

CCD301R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance III (5 credits)

This course prepares students to apply the fundamentals from CCD101R and 201R for practical stage performance. Complex movement and compound dance combinations are used for intensive conditioning. Studies in shen yun (bearing) focus on character portrayal and students are introduced the use of props, such as shuixiu (water sleeves) and changchou (silk ribbons), to deepen understanding of shen yun. When possible, bazigong (theatrical techniques using traditional weapons) is also used to enrich the students' experience. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD301R twice for a total of 10 credits. Prerequisite: 10 credits of CCD201R or instructor consent.

CCD302R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances III (1 credits)

This course provides an in-depth study of hua-gu-deng (flower drum lantern), one of the oldest folk dance styles of the Han Chinese. Students learn how the dance form and its unique musical accompaniments are used for various celebratory purposes. Students also learn how China’s northern and southern subcultures have influenced the special characteristics of hua-gu-deng. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD302R twice for a total of 2 credits. Prerequisite: 2 credits of CCD204R or by instructor consent.

CCD311A Dance Pedagogy A (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic principles, approaches, and materials in the teaching of dance at different levels and in different settings, ranging from K–12 and private studio to higher education. Both English and Mandarin Chinese are used in the instruction. Prerequisite: Junior class standing.

CCD311B Dance Pedagogy B (3 credits)

Through seminar and praxis formats, this course helps students apply the knowledge and competencies acquired in CCD311A. Students will be guided in developing pedagogical approaches, making lesson plans, and teaching classical Chinese dance in multiple settings. Prerequisite: CCD311A or by instructor consent.

CCD312A Choreography A (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic elements of choreography and the different choreographic devices. Students will use the devices to compose their own works. Emphasis is on classical Chinese dance. Both English and Chinese are used in the instruction.

CCD312B Choreography B (2 credits)

This course explores dance making as a creative problem-solving endeavor and focuses on group dances and narrative dances in classical Chinese dance. Both English and Chinese are used in the instruction. Prerequisite: CCD312A or by instructor consent.

CCD313 Policies and Standards in Dance Education (1 credit)

A series of weekly discussion/seminar sessions, this course familiarizes students with the latest policies in the state of New York regarding education and physical education. There is an emphasis on the commonality between Chinese dance and physical education.

CCD321R Repertory & Rehearsal II (2 credits)

This is a continuation of CCD221R and further develops students' overall performance and rehearsal skills. May culminate in performance. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD321R twice for a total of 4 credits. Prerequisite: 4 credits of CCD221R or by instructor consent.

CCD341 History of Classical Chinese Dance (3 credits)

This is a survey of the development of classical Chinese dance. It examines the origins of the dance tradition and major milestones while reflecting on the philosophical and aesthetic underpinnings of the different dance forms.

CCD351 Independent Study in Dance (1–4 credits)

This independent study course allows students an opportunity to investigate a topic outside the current dance curriculum. All independent study courses must be approved in advance and be closely supervised by a faculty member. An independent study proposal must include a course outline developed through consultation between the student and faculty supervisor; it will serve as the official course description. The course may take the form of faculty-supervised research, study, or a project. This course may be repeated for credit.

CCD361 Internship (1–4 credits)

The purpose of an internship is to let students gain valuable work experience in a professional environment by applying what they have learned. An internship usually lasts for five weeks with 20 to 40 hours of work per week. Review of applications usually begins in early April. This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CCD401R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance IV (5 credits)

This course consolidates the training covered in the previous three years. Emphasis is placed on the expressivity and refinement of movements and shen yun (bearing). Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD401R twice for a total of 10 credits. Prerequisite: 10 credits of CCD301R or by instructor consent.

CCD402R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances IV (1.5 credits)

This course primarily focuses on the dance of the ethnic Korean people of northeastern China. Students learn the unique musical rhythms, breath control, and rounded movements central to this dance genre. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD404R twice for a total of 3 credits. Prerequisite: 3 credits of CCD304R or instructor consent.

CCD411 Educational Psychology in Context (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic concepts and appropriate rubrics for assessing student learning outcomes in dance instruction. It examines mapping curriculum to student learning outcomes. Prerequisite: junior class standing or instructor consent.

CCD412A Advanced Choreography (2 credits)

This course focuses on choreographing in the styles of the different ethnic dance traditions in China. There will be in-depth study of the cultural characteristics of the ethnic dances. Both English and Chinese will be used in the instruction. Prerequisite: CCD312B or by instructor consent.

CCD412B Independent Study in Choreography (2 credits)

This course offers individual students the opportunity to synthesize their knowledge and experience in choreography and to create works under the close supervision of a dance faculty member. Prerequisite: CCD412A or by instructor consent.

CCD421R Repertory and Rehearsal III (2 credits)

This course enhances students' performance and rehearsal skills through the study of repertory and participation in choreographic collaborations with accomplished choreographers. May culminate in performance. Prerequisite: 4 credits of CCD321R or by instructor consent. Students majoring in Classical Chinese Dance are expected to complete CCD421R twice for a total of 4 credits.

CCD431 Stagecraft and Dance Production (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic elements and principles of theater production. Topics include set, costume, lighting, and sound design.

CCD452 Research Paper (4 credits)

This course offers the opportunity to write a research paper on a dance-related topic. The topic is selected by the student with advice and approval from the instructor.

CCD451 Senior Production (4 credits)

This course offers students an opportunity to develop their creative skills through choreographing and producing a small-scale dance performance of considerable complexity. The course is open to a limited number of students.

CCD455 Advanced Dance Practicum IV (4 credits)

This course is open to seniors wishing to tour or spend a season with a professional performance company, such as Shen Yun Performing Arts, to gain hands-on artistic and/or managerial experience. Enrollment is audition-based and is contingent upon the availability of relevant roles. Prerequisite: Instructor consent; 3 credits from each of CCD155, 255, and 355 is preferred.

15.6 Dance Courses

BUS121 Fundamentals of Arts Management (3 credits) Spring

This survey course explores the theories, processes, and practices behind strategic planning and decision-making in arts organizations today. Practical applications will focus on developing concrete strategies and plans for managing arts organizations, including business plans, managing boards, fund-raising, human resources, facilities, and program development.

BUS225 Finance for the Arts (3 credits) Fall

This course will present basic concepts of budgeting and the use of standard financial reports as essential financial management. This course is arranged to de-mystify basic financial management and raise student’s level of comfort with the concepts and decision making. We will discuss ways of promoting fiscal responsibility and practices throughout an organization, including understanding of roles and responsibilities of different positions within an organization.

BUS331 Arts and Entertainment Law (3 credits) Spring

This course is a practical examination of the legal rights and responsibilities of artists, (intellectual property, contracts, insurance). The course is an introductory view of an area of law that involves numerous disciplines, which protect, regulate, and facilitate the creation, use and marketing of arts.

DAB101R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet I (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course helps students develop the knowledge and experience of ballet at the barre and au milieu. Focus will be on developing strength, agility, and body awareness of the ballet’s foundations. The work at the barre focuses on developing the turn-out, the flexibility and strength in the legs, feet, and back, as well as the coordination of ballet movements. The exercises au milieu (in the center) focus on developing ballet technique and artistic expression through different combinations, port de bras, pirouettes, and petit and grand allegro. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN101R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance I (3 credits) Fall Spring

This studio course helps students develop a command of the fundamental techniques and movements in classical Chinese dance. The training focuses on extending the body’s flexibility and capabilities. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAB102R Pointe & Partnering I (1 credit) Fall Spring

This course gives an introduction of the work on pointe and partnering. The work on pointe will focus on developing strength and an anatomically correct basic technique. The partnering will focus on weight shift and balance points as preparation for pas de deux. The work on pointe includes relevés, echappés, pas de bourrés, sissonne simples, retiré passés, suivis and balances at the barre (at the bar) and au milieu (at the center). For male students,exercises for strengthening the upper-body. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN102R Shen Yun (身韻) I (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

This studio course introduces the basic components and body postures/movements in shen yun (bearing), one of the major characteristics of classical Chinese dance. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN141 Introduction to Performing (2 credits) Fall

This course is open to everyone, regardless if they are a Dance major or not. Students will learn acting, dancing, and music skills. There will be an open studio presentation at the end of the semester.

DAN103R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance I (1 credit) Fall Spring

This studio course trains students progressively in the basic techniques used in classical Chinese dance. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN104R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances I (1 credit) Fall Spring

This course introduces the basic movements, stylistic characteristics, and genres in the major traditions of Chinese ethnic and folk dances. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN121R Introduction to Repertoire of Dance (1 credit) Fall Spring

This studio course helps student develop basic understanding on performance and rehearsal skills through analyzing and rehearsing of works of classical Chinese dance and/or classical ballet. With each piece of work, students will familiarize with the structural design, and understand the emotions and meanings associated with the movements as well as the relation between dance and music.

DAN131 Performing and Acting (2 credits) Spring

This course develops students' appreciation and understanding of the art of acting, with the purpose of strengthening their acting skills and expressive power in dance performances.

DAN132 Modern Dance (2 credits) Fall

This course is an introduction of Modern dance. Students will study level I Graham-based technique. They will also learn about the history, cultural background, and choreography by Martha Graham. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

DAB201R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet II (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course strengthens students' foundation of ballet training: dance technique, artistic expression, and musicality. The focus will be to develop a versatility within the framework of the classic ballet’s style in consideration of musical tempi and phrase as well as the quality of the movement. Exercises par terre (on the floor) and en l’air (in the air) at the barre will develop strength, flexibility, and coordination. Exercises au milieu (at center) focus on different combinations with battements, pirouettes, port de bras, adagios, petit and grand allegro. Prerequisite: 6 credits of DAB 101R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN201R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance II (3 credits) Fall Spring

This studio course continues to develop students' body flexibility and capabilities, with an emphasis on practicing and mastering individual techniques, as well as technique variations in classical Chinese dance. Prerequisite: 6 credits of DAN101R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAB202R Pointe & Partnering II (1 credit) Fall Spring

This course deepens the students understanding and performance of the foundation of work on pointe and partnering. The work on pointe includes relevés, echappés, pas de bourrés, sissonnes, retiré passés, suivis, balances and pirouettes at the barre and au milieu. The partnering will focus on balances, promenades and pirouettes for female students and exercises for strengthening the upper-body for male students. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAB 102R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN202R Shen Yun (身韻) II (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

This course continues to develop students' individual artistry, while achieving freedom and dexterity in the application of shen yun. Students will integrate their skills and refine their expression, by performing dance combinations that utilize various components and movements. Prerequisite: 3 credits of DAN102R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN203R Special Techniques in Chinese Dance II (1 credit) Fall Spring

Built upon the first year’s training, this studio course further develops students' command of classical Chinese dance technique, by practicing advanced technique combinations within different variations. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN103R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN204R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances II (1 credit) Fall Spring

This course is a continuation of DAN104R. It helps students master more advanced styles Chinese folk and ethnic dances. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN104R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAB221R Repertory & Rehearsal I: Classical Ballet (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

The course offers an insight into classical ballet repertoire. Excerpts from full-length ballets (as well as choreographed new dance works) will be rehearsed and performed. The repertory includes the staging of solos, pas de deux, pas de trois and chorus. Students will deepen their understanding and performance of the ballet technique, style, artistry, and musicality in rehearsals and on stage. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN121 or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN221R Repertory & Rehearsal I: Classical Chinese Dance (1 credit) Fall Spring

This studio course develops students' overall performance and rehearsal skills through rehearsing works ranging from classical Chinese dance to Chinese folk dances. Prerequisite: DAN121R or by instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN232 Dance Anatomy (2 credits) Spring

This course teaches basic human body alignment, structures of muscles and bones, and energetic forces which make body movements. The course also covers skills for preventing and recovering from injuries.

DAN242 History of Dance: East and West (2 credits) Fall

This is a survey of the development of the major dance traditions of the East and the West. It examines the origins of the dance traditions and major milestones while reflecting on the philosophical and aesthetic underpinnings of the different dance forms.

DAB301R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet III (4 credits) Fall Spring

A continuation of DAB201R, this course further develops students' capabilities in the performance of the ballet technique and artistic expression. Students will further explore the expressive and dramatic qualities of the bodily moments. An important part will be the work au milieu as adagio with promenads and different cambrés, grand pirouettes, petit allegro with battus and turns and grand allegros and combinations with different dynamic qualities. Prerequisite: 6 credits of DAB 201R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN301R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance III (4 credits) Fall Spring

This 300-level course serves as a gateway for students to discover their individual potential. It draws upon foundational skills acquired from previous studio courses, and requires students to increase their range of motion while performing challenging movement sequences. Students will focus on expanding their artistic expression, synthesizing form, and technique, and developing their individual strengths. Prerequisite: 6 credits of DAN201R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAB302R Pointe & Partnering III (2 credits) Fall Spring

A continuation of DAB 202R, this course further develops students' capabilities in the performance of work on pointe and partnering. The work on pointe includes exercises on one foot in different poses, combinations, pirouettes from different positions, piqué pirouette en dedans and en dehors and sissonne ouverte. The partnering will focus on combinations including balances, promenades, pirouettes on pointe for girls, as well as basic lifts. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAB 202R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN302R Shen Yun (身韻) III (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

This course further trains students in shen yun (bearing) by focusing on the interpretation of different dance styles in classical Chinese dance. Prerequisite: 3 credits of DAN202R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN304R Chinese Folk and Ethnic Dances III (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

This course further develops students' command of the techniques and artistic expression in Chinese folk and ethnic dances. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN204R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN311A Dance Pedagogy A (2 credits) Fall

This course introduces the basic principles, approaches, and materials in the teaching of dance at different levels and settings, ranging from K–12 and private studio to higher education.

DAN311B Dance Pedagogy B (3 credits) Spring

Through seminar and praxis formats, this course helps students apply the knowledge and competencies acquired in DAN311A. Students will be guided in developing pedagogical approaches and making lesson plans for teaching either classical ballet or classical Chinese dance in multiple settings. Prerequisite: DAN311A or instructor consent.

DAB312A Choreography I: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Fall

This studio course introduces the basic elements of choreography and the different choreographic devices. Students will experiment with various compositional techniques, and use the devices to compose their own works. Emphasis is on classical ballet. Prerequisite: DAB 201R or instructor consent.

DAN312A Choreography I: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Fall

This studio course introduces the basic elements of choreography and the different choreographic devices. Students will experiment with various compositional techniques, and use the devices to compose their own works. Emphasis is on classical Chinese dance. Prerequisite: DAN101R, DAN102R, DAN103R, DAN104R and their repeats or instructor consent.

DAB312B Choreography II: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Spring

This course explores choreography as a creative problem-solving endeavor and focuses on the principles in choreographing group dances and narrative dances in Classical Ballet. There will be close examination of the phrasing of the movement, its musical structure, compositions of pes de duex, formations of the ensembles. The topics covered include the basic musicality, study of characters, dramatic impact, roles of male and female dancers, lighting, and costume design. Students will engage in exploratory and compositional practices both singly and collaboratively. Prerequisite: DAB312A or instructor consent.

DAN312B Choreography II: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Spring

This course explores dance making as a creative problem-solving endeavor and focuses on group dances in classical Chinese dance and/or folk and ethnic dances. Students will engage in exploratory and compositional practices both singly and collaboratively. Course activities comprise lecture, watching of course-related videos, project presentation, and class discussion. Prerequisite: DAN312A or instructor consent.

DAB321R Repertory & Rehearsal II: Classical Ballet (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

A continuation of DAB221R, this course focuses on mastering repertory work at intermediate level. The student offers an insight into ballet repertoire from different centuries. Scenes from full-length ballets as well as new dance works will be rehearsed and performed. The repertory includes staging of solo, pas de deux and chorus. Focus will be on the performance quality of the ballet technique, style, artistry, and musicality as well as developing awareness of the interpretation of different role characters and scenarios. Prerequisite: 4 credits of DAB 221R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN321R Repertory & Rehearsal II: Classical Chinese Dance (1.5 credits) Fall Spring

This is a continuation of DAN221R and further develops students' overall performance and rehearsal skills. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN221R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAB401R Fundamentals of Classical Ballet IV (4 credits) Fall Spring

This course consolidates the techniques covered in the previous three years. The last year of training focuses on the ballet syllabi at an advanced level. The interpretation of the ballet style will provide the opportunity to further explore the expressive and dramatic qualities of the bodily moments. An important part will be the work au milieu as adagio with promenads and different cambrés, grand pirouettes, petit allegro with battus and turns and grand allegros and combinations with different dynamic qualities. Prerequisite: 8 credits of DAB 301R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN401R Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance IV (4 credits) Fall Spring

Chinese dance program aims to help students achieve a level of professionalism and artistry. With the fundamentals at their disposal, students will learn to perform challenging combinations with ease, become fluent in a range of styles, and learn to project their feelings by unifying technique with artistic expression. Prerequisite: 8 credits of DAN301R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAB402R Pointe & Partnering IV (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course focuses on pointe and partnering work at an advanced level. The work on pointe includes combinations with pirouettes, piqué pirouettes, fouettés, temps levé, renversé and tours en manegé. The partnering will focus on combinations including balances, promenades, pirouettes and penchée for girls on pointe as well as lifts. Prerequisite: 4 credits of DAB 302R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN411 Dance in Education (1 credit)

This course examines the role of dance in education, and in arts education in particular. Students will reflect on the principles and philosophies of creative movement as a basic human means for understanding themselves, other people, and the world around them. Prerequisite: DAN311A, and DAN311B or instructor consent.

DAN412A Advanced Choreography (3 credits) Fall

This course focuses on choreographing narrative dance pieces, in the form of small dance dramas. Students will learn to create different motifs to portray different characters, and find ways to express various emotions while presenting a complete storyline. Prerequisite: DAN312B or instructor consent.

DAN413 Principles of Guidance and Pedagogy (2 credits)

This course explores issues in teaching dance at the college level, including topics such as lesson planning, class structure, student learning objectives, assessment methods, and grading. It includes preparation of a syllabus and studio teaching practice. This course takes the form of reading assignments, in-class discussions, lectures, observation and teaching summaries, self-reflective critical journal entries, and portfolio building. Prerequisite: DAN312B or instructor consent.

DAB421R Repertory & Rehearsal III: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Fall Spring

In this course, students will work on ballet repertoire at an advanced level. Ballets from different centuries as well as new dance works will be rehearsed and performed. The interpretation of different role characters will provide students with the opportunity to further explore the expressive and dramatic qualities of ballet and music in repertory work. Prerequisite: 3 credits of DAB 321R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN421R Repertory and Rehearsal III: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course enhances students' performance and rehearsal skills through the study of dance narratives and character portrayal. Prerequisite: 3 credits of DAN321R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN455 Senior Internship (4 credits) Spring

Senior Internship is a capstone course that serves as a culmination of students' dance skills and theoretical knowledge. It further develops their professionalism before they become working professionals. An internship lasts for an entire semester, with at least 10 hours of on-site work a week, for a total of 160 hours. Possible senior internships can be within the areas of pedagogy, choreography, or performance.

DAN461 Senior Project (4 credits)

The Senior Project is a capstone course that course challenges students to conduct research on the historical, cultural, and theoretical background, and analyze the composition and choreography of select repertoire. It also serves to give students experience in practical applications of their coursework, to develop the necessary core competencies—including communication, critical thinking, research, problem-solving, and professional orientation—which help prepare students to enter the professional dance field.

MUS243 History of Chinese Music (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic history of Chinese Music that will form a foundation of Chinese Music knowledge for more advanced learning both in music and dance fields

15.7 Data Science Courses

CIS102 Introduction to Computing (3 credits) Fall

This course emphasizes programming methodology, procedural abstraction, an introduction to object-oriented programming in Python, as well as an integrated lab component of hands-on lab experiences conducted during lectures and integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite: None

CIS103 Web Development (3 credits) Spring

This course focuses on concepts and programing skills for web application development. It starts with the front-end by an introduction to networking basics, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. In the second half of course, students learn the back-end programing and APIs. Students will build style interactive sites as projects. Prerequisite: CIS102

CIS104 Essentials for Software Development in Data Science (3 credits) Spring

This course is a hands-on lab computer classes which helps students to understand the full stack software development process, recognize the basic hardware and networking infrastructure for software development, get familiar with certain useful tools for software development, set up local development environment on a laptop/desktop, develop web software application using Python flask framework for data science, and deploy and run a web application in Amazon AWS cloud computing environments.

CIS105 Data Structure and Algorithms (3 credits) Spring

This course focuses on program design, analysis, and verification with an introduction to the study of data structures and algorithm design that are important in the construction of sophisticated computer programs. Topics include algorithm complexity analysis, elementary data structures, (including arrays, stacks, queues, and lists), advanced data structures (including hashes, trees, and graphs), their implementation, algorithms used to manipulate these structures, and their application to solving practical data science problems. Prerequisite: CIS102

CIS121 Java Programming (3 credits) Fall

This course emphasizes on the main principles of object-oriented software design and programming with Java. Students also learn how to use Java library packages and classes, as well as selecting appropriate algorithms and data structures to solve a given problem. With integrated labs and projects, students have opportunities to practice skills in designing object-oriented software solutions to problems from various application areas. Prerequisite: None

CIS221 Database Systems (3 credits) Fall

This course is an introduction to database system concepts and techniques. Topics covered include database environments; ER models; relational data models and relational algebra; schema refinement and normal forms; transactions; SQL; NoSQL and Mongo DB; XML and related technologies. Prerequisite: CIS102

CIS241 Practical Data Analytics Using Python (1 credit) Fall

This course provides students with hands-on experience to solve basic data collection, data cleaning, data visualization and analytics problems using Python programing language and relevant packages/toolkits. Using real-world datasets, students will learn and practice programing and analytic skills to collect and to explore data, to raise questions and to test assumptions. Students also learn about ethical practices when using data. Prerequisite: CIS102

CIS242 Computational Analysis and Practical Programming (1 credit) Spring

This one-credit course is an intermediate course of numerical coding. Students will be trained in solving mathematical problems by writing efficient codes in Python that execute given numerical algorithms. Prerequisite: CIS102, STA101, MAT105 & MAT103

CIS331 Data Mining (3 credits) Fall

This course offers the students the opportunity of learning fundamental data mining concepts and algorithms. Some of the topics covered in this course include data preparation; similarity and clustering; near duplicates detection; item sets and association rule mining; recommender systems; outlier analysis; time series mining; model evaluation. Prerequisite: CIS105 & STA101

CIS335 Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence (3 credits) Spring

This course introduces the use of statistical learning algorithms that allows computers to help making decisions and predictions, and performing tasks that traditionally require human cognitive abilities. Some of the machine learning algorithms covered in the course include logistic regression, k-nearest neighbors, k-means, decision trees, random forests, gradient boosting, principal component analysis, hierarchical clustering, support vector machines, naïve Bayes, etc. An introduction to the deep learning algorithms with appropriate use case scenarios will also be covered toward the end of the course. Some basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods will be introduced. Students will get familiar with Python machine learning tools and use them for projects. Prerequisite: CIS105 & STA101

CIS341 Cloud Computing and Big Data (3 credits) Fall

In this course, students will learn cloud computing concepts using cloud infrastructure provided by the largest cloud vendors, Amazon (AWS) and Microsoft (Azure). Students will also learn Big Data concepts, including databases, relational and non-relational databases, SQL, etc. Finally, students will get some hands-on experiences with cloud computing and Big Data technologies. Prerequisite: CIS102

CIS351 Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 credits) Spring

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practical approaches of bioinformatics as applied to genes and proteins. The course enables students to broadly understand the type of mathematical and algorithmic reasoning that lies behind various important bioinformatics tools, and to gain some working knowledge in using certain biological databases and on-line bioinformatics algorithms. Prerequisite: CIS102 & BSC101

DAS151A Real-time Data Analytics A (1 credit) Fall

This course introduces the student to tasks, roles, responsibilities, and career opportunities in Data Sciences, and crossing over with Biomedical Sciences, by working on actual projects with partners including NASA, United Nations, USGS and many more. Summer internships may be available based on year-long performance Students develop professional skills while working on locally-oriented projects that have relevance to the larger global community, such as urban management and sustainable resources. Prerequisite: None

DAS151B Real-time Data Analytics B (1 credit) Spring

This course continues development of student skills and projects from DAS151A. The student to tasks, roles, responsibilities, and career opportunities in Data Sciences, and crossing over with Biomedical Sciences, by working on actual projects with partners including NASA, United Nations, USGS and many more. Summer internships may be available based on year-long performance. Students develop professional skills while working on locally-oriented projects that have relevance to the larger global community, such as urban management and sustainable resources. Prerequisite: DAS151A

DAS152A Applied Real-time Data Analysis A (1 credit) Fall

This course introduces the student to tasks, roles, responsibilities, and career opportunities in Data Sciences, and crossing over with Biomedical Sciences, by working on actual projects with partners including NASA, United Nations, USGS and many more. Summer internships may be available based on year-long performance. Students develop professional skills while working on locally-oriented projects that have relevance to the larger global community, such as urban management and sustainable resources. Prerequisite: DAS151B

DAS152B Applied Real-time Data Analysis B (0 credit) Spring

This course introduces the student to tasks, roles, responsibilities, and career opportunities in Data Sciences, and crossing over with Biomedical Sciences, by working on actual projects with partners including NASA, United Nations, USGS and many more. Summer internships may be available based on year-long performance. Students develop professional skills while working on locally-oriented projects that have relevance to the larger global community, such as urban management and sustainable resources. Prerequisite: DAS152A

DAS321 Sample Survey and Customer Analytics (3 credits) Spring

The course introduces basic sample survey theory and method, questionnaire design, data collection, survey data analysis for customer questionnaires. Students use R or SAS to implement designs and analyses of survey data. Prerequisite: STA101

DAS341 Business Data Analytics (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces core statistical techniques of data retrieval, analysis and modeling used by business professionals to make an efficient data-driving decision. It also covers the topics of effective interpretation of data and statistical results in business world. Prerequisite: STA101 or consent of instructor

DAS342 Health Data Analytics (3 credits) Fall

This is an introduction to health care data analytics concepts and methods. Topics include the creation of datasets, the structure of datasets, an introduction to data warehousing and working with large databases, an introduction to public health and healthcare datasets, methods for descriptive analytics and predictive analytics. Prerequisite: STA101

DAS345 Introduction to Computational Biology (3 credits) Fall

Students will have opportunities to perform data management and statistical analysis in biomedical sciences and public health. Various types of data analytic, its advantages and disadvantages in biomedical sciences and public health will be discussed. Accompanied by hands-on experience, students will apply data analysis to address issues in areas such as public health program effectiveness, patient safety, health care utilization, and health care costs. Prerequisite: BSC101 & STA101

DAS351 Data Science Internship (3 credits) Summer

Internships provide entry-level, off-campus career-related experience. Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. This course provides students with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to their program of study. Through course assignments and workplace tasks and projects the student will apply, connect, and extend in-class academic theory and skills for a professional development. Prerequisite: Permission form

DAS451 Senior Project (4 credits) Spring

In this project-oriented course, students will work in small groups to solve real-world data analysis problems and communicate their results. Innovation and clarity of presentation will be key elements of evaluation. Students will have an option to do this as an independent data analytics internship with an industry partner. Prerequisite: Upon advisor approval

DAS461 Directed Study: Career Development (2 credits) Fall/Spring

This intensive laboratory course will focus on data analysis projects with real data selected by the students. The core skills are oriented around framing research questions, having these guide data management, visualization, selection of modeling techniques to the result analysis and presentation. R or other statistical programming language will be applied. This course is intended to assist students explore their career direction and development. Prerequisite: Upon advisor approval

MAT103 Linear Algebra (4 credits) Fall

This is an introductory linear algebra course intended for students in science, engineering, and other related areas. Students will learn basic concepts and tools in linear algebra as well as practice writing numerical codes in Python to execute key algorithms such as Gaussian Elimination and LU factorization. Prerequisite: None

MAT105 Calculus I (4 credits) Fall

This course is the first part of Calculus course covering topics such as limits, derivatives, and integration of single-variable functions. Application and execution of these mathematical tools to real-world problems with theoretical derivation or numerical coding is also introduced. This course is intended for students in science, engineering, economics, and computer science, among other disciplines. Prerequisite: None

MAT106 Calculus II (4 credits) Spring

This course is the second part of Calculus course covering topics such as advanced techniques of integration, polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, and multiple integrals. Application of these mathematical tools to real-world problems is also introduced. In addition, students will practice simple numerical coding to execute algorithms learned from the course. Prerequisite: MAT105

MAT207 Calculus III (3 credits) Spring

This course covers techniques of limits and continuity of multivariable functions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient, extreme values, multiple integration, the calculus of vector valued functions, line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, and Stokes’s Theorem. Besides lectures, students are required to take the lab and discussion session. Prerequisite: MAT106

MAT311 Matrix Analysis (3 credits) Spring

This is a second, upper–level course in linear algebra. Students will gain an adequate understanding of matrix theory and linear algebra so that they can use the concepts in applications. We will study determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, singular value decompositions, least squares, linear equations, eigenvalues, canonical forms, and QR decompositions. Prerequisite: MAT103

STA101 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits) Spring

This course is an introductory course in statistics intended for students in a wide variety of areas of study. The goal is to teach basic knowledge in statistical concepts and establish understanding of basic statistical methods. Students will also learn simple R codes to execute those methods to gain experience in statistical computing. Prerequisite: None

STA205 Statistical Computing & Graphics (3 credits) Spring

Statistical computing and graphics is an essential part of data analyst job. In this course, students learn how to collect, process, analyze, and present data through statistical programming in R. They will learn the practice of data cleaning, reshaping of data, basic tabulations, and aggregations in order to be able to produce high quality visualizations. In addition to regular numerical data, students will also have opportunity to practice basic skills extracting, analyzing, and visualizing text data, which is a major component of data sources to answer business and social questions nowadays. Prerequisite: STA101

STA202 Introduction to Probability (3 credits) Fall

This course is a basis for statistics. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability and independent events, special discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, variance, laws of large numbers and the central limit theorem. Prerequisite: STA101 & MAT106

STA211 Statistical Theory and Methods (3 credits) Spring

This course is intended for majors in data science. In this course, student will learn moment generating function, order statistics, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, quality of estimators, interval estimation, maximum likelihood, large-sample theory, introduction to hypothesis testing, Bayesian estimator, linear models, and ANOVA. Prerequisite: STA202

STA305: Advanced Statistical Computing and Graphics (3 credits) Fall

This course covers advanced topics in statistical computing with cases studies. Students will have opportunities to practice statistical programing in both R and Python. Some topics covered include interactive data visualization, statistical simulations, bootstrapping, Monte Carlo methods, parallel programing for data science, hypothesis testing and power analysis. Prerequisite: STA205

STA311: Applied Regression Analysis (3 credits) Fall

This course is a comprehensive course in the theory and methods of fitting multiple linear regression and related techniques of statistical modeling, estimation, and inference. Prerequisite: STA101 & MAT103

STA321 Design and Analysis of Experiments (3 credits) Spring

In this course students learn how to use the methods of statistical design of experiments (DOE) in order to design efficient experiments, analyze results correctly and present them in a clear fashion. Statistical DOE is used widely in both industry and academia. Graduate and undergraduate students from any field of science or engineering can use the methods learned in the course in their projects and research. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor

STA331 Multivariate Analysis (3 credits) Fall

The goal of this course is to help students develop the statistical skills to approach and analyze multivariate data correctly in an applied context. Topics include linear algebra, the multivariate normal distribution, principle components, factor analysis, discriminant function, cluster analysis, Hotelling’s T2 and MANOVA. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor

STA335 Bayesian Analysis (3 credits) Spring

This is an advanced undergraduate/master level course that introduces the Bayesian approach to statistical inference for data analysis. Students will learn the theory of Bayesian inference, and data analysis using statistical software (mainly R) will also be emphasized. Topics include priors, posteriors, basics of decision theory, Markov chain Monte Carlo, Bayes factor, empirical Bayes, Bayesian linear regression and generalized linear models, hierarchical models. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor

STA341 Survival Analysis (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces basic concepts and methods for analyzing survival time data obtained from following individuals until occurrence of an event or their loss to follow-up. We will begin this course from describing the characteristics of survival (time to event) data and building the link between distribution, survival, and hazard functions. After that, we will cover non-parametric, semi-parametric, and parametric models and two-sample test techniques. During the class, students will also learn how to use R to analyze survival data. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor

STA345 Nonparametric Statistics (3 credits) Spring

This course will provide students with the basic theory and computing tools to perform nonparametric tests including the sign test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, and Wilcoxon rank sum test, as well as the corresponding nonparametric point and interval estimation. Additional nonparametric tests such as Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman tests for one-way and two-way analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, dispersion, and independence problems will also be covered. Other topics include estimation methods for nonparametric density, regression, and computing as they relate to nonparametric statistics and bootstrapping. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor

STA371 Optimization (3 credits) Spring

This is an introduction of numerical methods for continuous multivariate optimization (unconstrained and constrained). Topics include line-search and trust-region strategies; gradient descent, Nesterov acceleration, stochastic gradient, momentum; conjugate-gradient, Newton-Raphson, quasi-Newton, and large-scale methods; primal and dual in convex optimization; linear programming; quadratic programming; augmented Lagrangian methods; sequential quadratic programming. Prerequisite: STA211 or consent of instructor

ECO101 Principles of Economics (3 credits) Fall

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of economics, including both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The part about microeconomics includes the concepts of scarcity and opportunity cost, consumer and producer behaviors, market structures, market failures, government roles and government failures, welfare, exchange, and comparative advantages. While in the part about macroeconomics, students will learn measures of national income, income growth and inequality, unemployment, inflation, money supply, banking and financial institutions, and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: None

ECO211 Microeconomics (3 credits) Spring

This course is an intermediate course on Microeconomics. It introduces the optimization methodology for how society addresses the economic problem of resource scarcity and its efficient allocation. In addition, the course explores what happens to the market when the government tries to play a role in the distribution of resources. Throughout the course students will study how households and firms make choices so as to best allocate the resources available to them in various structures of market. Prerequisite: ECO101

ECO343 Health Economics (3 credits) Fall

This course is designed to introduce students to basic health economic terminology, concepts, theories, procedures, and methods that are widely used in health-related industries. Students will have opportunities to develop relevant analytical and modeling skills via case study and real-world examples to address current economic problems and issues in the healthcare industry. Prerequisite: ECO101

BUS211 Marketing in Creative Industries (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces the concept of creative industries and its main characteristics as opposed to non-creative industries. By reviewing current marketing studies of creative industries, this course introduces a general managerial model whose fundamentals are value, experience, and creativity. It further analyzes custom experiences, the process of product value creation and delivery, the business side of marketing as well as the management of the multi-media and multi-channel marketing in today’s environment. Lastly, the organizational issues such as property rights and ethical law are discussed. Prerequisite: None

BUS311 Business Finance (3 credits) Spring

This course attempts to develop a framework which will provide students with an overview of financial systems, and the main concepts and principles of investments. Students who master the course material will acquire the analytical tools and financial theory necessary for making good investment decisions and understand the paradigms by which financial securities are valued from the perspective of a portfolio manager. This course can also serve as a preparation course for students interested in taking the CFA or FRM tests in the near future. Prerequisite: ECO211

BUS335 Pricing and Revenue Management (3 credits) Fall

This course provides an introduction to both the theory and the practice of revenue management and pricing; the course develops a set of methodologies that students can use to identify and develop opportunities for revenue optimization in different business contexts including show business, media, health care, transportation, and hospitality industries, etc. The course places particular emphasis on discussing quantitative data-driven models and their implementations. Prerequisite: ECO101 & MAT103

MAT101 Applied Math (3 credits) Fall

This course serves general-education purpose for students that are not majored in science. The course focuses on introducing new mathematical concepts, tools and techniques that can be applied to understand or solve real-world problems in daily life. A few examples of topics include finance, investment, measurement, management etc. Prerequisite: None

MAT104 Applied Calculus (3 credits) Fall

This course is a one-semester introductory calculus course covering basic analytic geometry of graphs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integration and applications to the biomedical science and other disciplines. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics (including trigonometry and logarithms) or a pre-calculus course. Prerequisite: None

STA102 Statistics in Real Life (3 credits) Spring

The course introduces basic probability theory, essential statistical techniques and methods of data analysis that are commonly encountered in real life applications. Prerequisite: None

15.8 Fine Arts and Design Courses

ARH101 Art History I (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course is the first in a required three-semester sequence. It covers the history of art and architecture in both Western and non-Western cultures from Paleolithic to the Early Renaissance

ARH102 Art History II (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course builds on ARH101 Art History I and covers the history of art and architecture in the West from the Early Renaissance (approximately 1500 CE) to the Late Realism (Early 1900s) periods.

ARH131 History of Graphic Design (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course explores the history of graphic design from the earliest communication technologies to the present, with a focus on the Modern era. It will examine changes in style and technology within the field and considers the relationship between graphic design and its cultural, political, and social contexts.

ARH203 Art History III (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course builds on ARH101 Art History I and ARH102 Art History II. It covers the history of art and architecture in Western and non-Western cultures from the Impressionism period (late 1800’s) to Contemporary art (the present).

ART101A Perspective A (2 credits) Fall

This course focuses on differentiating between art’s “generalized perspective”, “narrow perspective” in the 14th century, “linear perspective”, and other methods of scientific perspective in art. Understanding perspective is critical in order to accurately represent a three-dimensional subject using a two-dimensional medium from a variety of perspectives.

ART101B Perspective B (2 credits) Spring

This course builds on ART101A Perspective A. It introduces the basic principles of shadow perspective, as well as theories and methods of drawing perspectives in projection.

ART102A Art Anatomy A (2 credits) Fall

This course is the first part of one-year lecture in Art Anatomy. It introduces the basic structure and movement of the human body. Art anatomy enables students to accurately depict the structure of the portrait, to convey the facial structure and shape of human beings, and to draw the artwork closer to reality.

ART102B Art Anatomy B (2 credits) Spring

This course builds on ART102A Art Anatomy A and focuses on the study of the human torso. The essential task is to learn and master the human body structure so that human body can be realistically and objectively rendered from a variety of perspectives.

ART103 Introduction to Sculpture (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course is an auxiliary course for students majoring in painting. By learning three-dimensional art, students can strengthen their understanding of two-dimensional space in painting and their knowledge of art anatomy.

ART105 Photography (2 credits) Fall Spring         

This is a beginning level course on photography. It will introduce photographic theory, techniques, applications, composition, and history. The course will include hands-on demonstrations with the camera as well as basic digital image editing techniques.

ART107 Dynamic Composition (2 credits) Fall

This lecture course develops an awareness of the fundamentals behind dynamic symmetry including Baroque Diagonal, Sinister Diagonal, and Reciprocal Lines, within the Armature (framework) of a composition. These are used with the golden number (ratio) to produce realistic and aesthetic representations of subjects inside two and three-dimensional compositions.

ART111 Visual Literacy I (2 credits) Fall

This course covers the principles, elements, and foundations of design and the formal aspects of visual composition through readings, discussions, exercises, and laboratory applications. This is a visual design theory course that introduces the core concepts of visual design — visual elements, principles of design and creative process. Composition issues and strategies are explored through examples, exercises, critiques, and creative projects.

ART112 Visual Literacy II (2 credits) Spring

This course builds on ART 111 Visual Literacy I and further expand into the basic elements of design and its practical applications in flat compositions as well as in tridimensional compositions. The course format will include lectures, field trips, discussions, activities, video presentations, and readings.

ART410 Mural Art (2 credits) Fall

This course introduces the basic theories and methods of mural art. It lays a foundation for students to create large-scale painting.

ART351 Fine Arts and Design Internship (2–3 credits) Summer

Internships provide entry-level, off-campus career-related experience. Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. This course provides students with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to their program of study. Through course assignments and workplace tasks and projects the student will apply, connect, and extend in-class academic theory and skills for a professional development.

ART451 Senior Project (4 credits) Fall Spring

This course provides senior students with practical experience in the development of a refined, intelligent, professional artwork as well as exposures to professional practices for artists. Students will be led by a mentor to work on their project. Throughout the course, students will participate in regular class discussions facilitated by a department faculty, so that they can share their experiences and learn from their peers.

ART 461 Senior Internship (4 credits) Fall Spring

During this course, senior students can gain work experience through participation in internships off campus such as museum, gallery, design studios and so on.

DRP101R Drawing I (4 credits) Fall

This studio course introduces the essential elements of drawing such as “block-in”, or linear drawing, shape, proportion, gesture, form, as well as how light actually affects the subject and how to depict a three dimensional object on a two dimensional surface. Students will learn how to accurately translate visual information into two dimensions while addressing fundamental properties of composition, light direction, and value organization. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DRP102 Painting (4 credits) Spring

This course is designed to introduce the basics of painting to students with background in classical painting. Students will be challenged to think pictorially, adding in elements of anatomy, structure, perspective, and composition alongside color. This will further aid students in understand the importance of combining the usage of color, composition, and a grand tonal harmony.

DRP103 Quick Sketch Techniques (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course introduces quick sketch theories and techniques. It attempts to help students develop the ability to use a simple line to draw a dynamic or static image of human and objects in a short time. With its extension, quick sketch may stimulate potential creativity.

DRP201R Drawing II (4 credits) Fall Spring

This course introduces a variety of approaches to drawing the human figure including drawing figure plates, and from live and skeletal models. Students will study the fundamentals of figure drawing including how to measure and understand the dynamic movements and gestures of a figure in a pose. The goal of this course is to create natural and realistic works of art with exceptional technical skill in the style of 19th century academic art. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DRP202 Still Life Painting (2 credits) Fall

This course will look at the history of the genre from its origins all the way up to its modern form. Students will compose and paint a series of still life for the sake of developing the fundamentals of drawing, light, color, composition, and concept.

DRP203 Landscape Painting (2 credits) Spring

This studio course introduces different landscape oil painting principles, techniques, and genre. It will provide students with logical and practical aids to understand how to approach the difficulties of landscape painting. We will also discuss the basics of landscape painting such as paint application, color harmony, atmospheric perspective as well as glazing techniques.

DRP204 Small-scale Painting (2 credits) Spring

In this course, students will learn to develop a series of thumbnail oil sketches to better understand the fundamentals of value relationships, color design, composition, perspective, and overall pictorial harmony. Students will also analyze Old Master works by breaking them down into a series of studies, each focused on a single element.

DRP301R Drawing III (6 credits) Fall Spring

This studio course helps students develop a command of techniques in multi-figure narrative drawing. The focus of this course is to train students' ability to present stories and compose certain ideas or feelings. Students will learn to compose a large number of figures into a final drawing that shows some type of action in a moment of a narrative. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to depict the interactions between the figures by gesture and expression. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DRP310R Composition I (2 credits) Fall Spring

This is the first course of a 2-sequence course. This course attempts to help students develop a command of oil painting composition. The emphasis of this course is on theme composition and factors of concept development to application are studied and practiced. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DRP321 Portrait Painting (2 credits) Fall

Portrait painting is an essential training for students in fine art. This course introduces the theories, sketching methods, and techniques of portrait oil painting. Students will gain the ability to grasp strong likeness of the model, lay down paint in the right way and understand color and flesh tone.

DRP322 Half-length Portrait Painting (2 credits) Spring

This course is designed to allow students to learn to develop a fully composed portrait composition while learning to express accurate proportions of the head, neck, bust, and hand. Starting with Old Master paintings for inspiration, students will set the scene with a model, costume, surroundings…etc. Learning to edit ideas and choose shapes, colors, and textures that create harmony and balance will be an essential part of this course.

DRP323A Nude Painting A (2 credits) Fall

This course is an advanced course. Students will learn to synthesize the procedures, techniques and experience gained in drawing the figure as they approach painting the figure in full color. Students will learn to modulate the properties of hue, value and chroma from the block-in to value and color studies, under-painting, all the way to the final pass.

DRP323B Nude Painting B (2 credits) Spring

This course is an advanced course. Students will practice further enhancing their understanding of the nude figure by incorporation more difficult poses, the use of the skeleton model, and écorchés. Students will focus on the large structural masses of the body and how they move together to support the gesture. Paint and color handling will be discussed in depth.

DRP324R Full-Body Painting (2 credits) Fall

In this course, students learn to synthesize the techniques and experience gained in Nude Painting as they paint the figure in clothing within an external environment. This will challenge the students to think about the figure in perspective, composition, and large tonal families. This is an important course for basic training in the fine arts program. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DRP341 Intro to Illustration (2 credits) Spring

This course equips students with the fundamental skills in storytelling through digital illustration. It will cover the technical skills that are essential for an illustrator, including perspectives, color and lighting, composition, figure, and portrait drawing. At the same time, students will be guided to explore how to articulate ideas and convey emotions through artworks. By the end of this course, students will have completed a variety of tasks – including a story-driven illustration of their own.

DRP401R Drawing IV (6 credits) Fall Spring

This studio course helps students develop a command of techniques in multi-figure narrative drawing. The focus of this course is to train the student’s ability to present stories and compose certain ideas or feelings. Students will learn to compose a large number of figures into a final drawing that shows some type of action in a moment of a narrative. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to depict the interactions between the figures by gesture and expression. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DRP410R Composition II (2 credits) Fall Spring

This is the second course of a 2-sequence course. In this advanced course students will continue improving their oil painting techniques and artistic level and expand their horizon from theme composition to free creation. Students will levitate their artistic creativity by reflecting their inner world and casting it into the outer world. (This course has to be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DSG101 Design Studio I (3 credits) Fall

This is the first of a 4-sequence studio course. This course is an intensive exploration of the fundamental principles of graphic design through a series of periodical studio assignments and critiques – supplemented by short readings, lectures, and the odd screening or field trip. The studio focus of this course is on the effects of line.

DSG102 Design Studio II (3 credits) Spring

This intermediate level course expands the skills and knowledge acquired in Design Studio I. In this studio course, the focus is on the effects of space, supplemented by short readings, lectures, and the odd screening or field trip.

DSG103 Typography Design I (3 credits) Fall

Typography is a foundation course for the graphic design curriculum. This is a studio course, introducing the art of visual communication: the visual realization of a most basic element of communication – THE WORD. The history of typographic forms, principles of composition, and the expressive potential of type will be explored through readings, research, workshops, and projects. The course will include lectures, field trips, discussion, activities, video, and course readings.

DSG104 Typography Design II (3 credits) Spring

This course explores the methods for designing and communicating complex information of a typographic nature. Course readings, lectures, exercises, presentations, and projects provide a framework to expand the student’s thinking and practice related to forms of typographic expression. Effective typography includes laboring to explore and balance the relationship between the details and the vision—working iteratively in order to create materials that are functional, expressive, compelling, and appropriate.

DSG151 Image Making (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course will introduce digital art image making, editing and design techniques as a foundation upon which an effective visual language is built.Expressing, evaluating, and communicating ideas with visual images is a primary focus of this course.

DSG201 Design Studio III (3 credits) Fall

This is the third of a 4-sequence studio course. This course is an advanced level course that expands the skills and knowledge acquired in Design Studio II. In this studio course, we focus on the effects of Texture. Students continue to develop an understanding of the conceptual, technical, and theoretical issues related to design through the completion of assignments, discussions, and critiques. – supplemented by short readings, lectures, and the odd screening or field trip.

DSG202 Design Studio IV (3 credits) Spring

This is the last of a 4-sequence studio course. This course is an advanced level course that expands the skills and knowledge acquired in Design Studio III. It will focus on the effects of value and color. Students continue to develop an understanding of the conceptual, technical, and theoretical issues related to design through the completion of assignments, discussions, and critiques. – supplemented by short readings, lectures, and the odd screening or field trip.

DSG203 Typography Design III (3 credits) Fall

This course is an advanced investigation into typography and text for verbal and visual expression. Analysis of meaning and structure, design composition, and communication to specific audiences is studied.

DSG215 Design with Color (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces color theory and how to apply it in design work. Students will experiment and explore color and color relationships through a series of exercises designed to strengthen their understanding of historical and contemporary color theories.

DSG241 Brand Identity (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of branding and logo design. The student will be able to effectively design a brand that communicates its purpose statement and identity. Color theory and visual communication skills will be developed through this course.

DSG321 Motion Graphics Studio I (3 credits) Fall

This is an introductory course to motion graphics for upper-level undergraduate graphic design majors who have a strong foundation in typography and print design. This course introduces the theories, techniques, and practices of motion graphics and the integration of design, photo imaging, sound, video, and animation.

DSG322 Motion Graphics Studio II (3 credits) Spring

This course provides advanced instruction in creating motion graphics. Through utilizing 3D elements, advanced effects, music, color theory, layout and storyboards, students will be trained in advanced workflows in a studio-like environment with an emphasis on creativity, finish, and aesthetics.

DSG331 Environmental Graphic Design (3 credits) Fall

This course is an introductory course to the Environmental Graphic Design. Students will study the means and methods of wayfinding system, signage, placemaking, exhibit design, and mapped and themed environments through class exercises and projects.

DSG332 Advertising Design (3 credits) Spring

This course covers the basic concept, theories, and principles of advertising design. Students will study key factors, strategies and a variety of media and expressive techniques in order to create advertising materials including print ads, package with promotions, advertising campaign and more.

DSG334 Web Design (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course introduces the basic concepts, principles, and technologies of web creation. Students will learn basic HTML, CSS and Cascading Style sheets and use a variety of design software to organize, create, publish, and manage a web site.

15.9 Liberal Arts and Science Courses

LAS001 ESL (0 credit)

Designed to help English language learners achieve college-level English proficiency so they can perform competently in academic tasks relevant to their majors. The goal is to enhance students' ability to read critically, discuss effectively, and present ideas in coherent and effective writing. Vocabulary and grammar will be covered in the context of reading and writing.

LAS002 Introduction to College English (0 credit)

A prerequisite to LAS103 Effective English for students who are identified by English placement testing as in need of remediation. Focus is given to the mirror processes of reading and writing, including grammatical and stylistic study. Upon completion students will be better prepared for all liberal arts classes in which writing and critical reading are needed.

LAS100 College Success (2 credits)

Designed to help students achieve greater success in college and in life. Topics include many proven strategies for creating greater academic, professional, and personal success, such as time management and note-taking skills. In addition, the information literacy skills students develop will not only prepare them for doing original research in college but also equip them for success in the 21st-century workplace.

LAS103/ENG101 Effective English (3 credits)

Offers a highly structured approach to academic writing with a focus on the recursive nature of the writing process. Students read a variety of pieces by masters of the craft, engage in critical discussion, and write constantly throughout the course sequence. Assignments include several short response pieces as well as three to four major papers, ranging from process analysis to argumentation. This course is highly practical in nature and is meant to hone some of the skills most valuable to college success and career readiness. Prerequisite: Placement test.

LAS110/CIV101 Western Civilization (3 credits)

Surveys the major achievements of Western civilization from its beginnings to the end of the Renaissance, with emphasis on developments in the visual and creative arts. An organizing theme of the course is the relationship between religious values and humanistic achievement. Multimedia and primary source readings feature prominently, both of which students will be expected to respond to in writing. Prerequisite: ENG101 or by instructor consent.

LAS120/MAT101 Mathematics in Applied Context (3 credits)

Covers the fundamental concepts and applications of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and data interpretation. Reinforces students' ability to reason quantitatively—to read a math problem, understand what it is asking, and solve it. Prepares students with quantitative reasoning skills required for professional work as well as for graduate-level studies in the fields of performing arts, liberal arts, and business.

LAS204/ENG104 Public Speaking (3 credits)

A workshop-style course sequence designed to help students become better communicators in their social and professional lives. Emphasis is on overcoming self-consciousness and developing clarity of thought and expression. Students examine real-life speeches, exploring the interplay of the many elements of oration and rhetoric, such as structure, diction, enunciation, eye contact, and body language. Students present informational, persuasive, and impromptu speeches throughout the course and also practice interview skills. Prerequisite: ENG101 or by instructor consent.

LAS220/MAT104 Applied Calculus (3 credits)

Intended for students who wish to learn the basics of calculus for application to social sciences or as part of a broader education. Topics include functions, limits, differentiation, and integration, for applications such as calculating rate of change, growth and decay, optimization, and elementary differential equations. Prerequisite: Placement test.

LAS231/HUM231 Comparative Culture: China and West (3 credits)

A course that compares the most salient features of the Chinese and Western cultures in their major aspects, including geographical conditions, language and writing system, philosophical systems, government and political philosophy, law, international relations, war and military science, economic life, family and social structure, and art and literature. Prerequisite: CIV101 and CIV102 or by instructor consent.

LAS232/HUM221 The Making of the Modern World (3 credits)

A survey of the political, cultural, and social history of Europe, America, and Asia from the Enlightenment (18th century) to the Cold War. Major topics include the French Revolution, Romanticism, nationalism, imperialism, revolutions and world wars, and the Cold War. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CIV101 or by instructor consent.

LAS262 Moral Awareness and Spiritual Practice (1 credit)

This seminar course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts of the spiritual practice of Falun Dafa as well as of the major world traditions, such as Buddhism, Taoism, and Christianity, thereby reinforcing awareness of the universal values that have informed humankind’s moral life for thousands of years. Through seminars, readings, and discussion, students are guided to build a solid foundation for righteous belief and ethical conduct. They will also have a chance to engage various moral issues and ethical questions in an introspective and reflexive manner.

LAS313/HUM204 Survey of Western Literature (3 credits)

A chronological survey of major authors in western literature since earliest times to the 19th century. Encompassing works in all major genres ranging from epics and tragedies to novels and poetry, the course provides opportunities for students to critically engage with literary texts, examining their ideological implications as well as aesthetic and stylistic characteristics. Prerequisite: ENG101.

LAS334 Topics in Liberal Arts in Sciences (3 credits)

An interdisciplinary seminar course sequence designed to reinforce students' critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and quantitative skills. Students engage in intensive reading of texts and journal articles on selected topics in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences and also apply mathematical concepts and modeling to real-world scenarios. Through extensive discussion and writing of analytical responses, students hone their ability to detect underlying assumptions, evaluate the validity of arguments and experimental design, and express their viewpoints with clarity and precision. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

LAS350 Independent Study in Arts and Sciences (1–4 credits)

This independent study course provides students an opportunity to investigate a topic outside the current course offerings from the Department of LAS. All independent study courses must be approved in advance and be closely supervised by a faculty member. An independent study proposal must include a course outline developed through consultation between the student and faculty supervisor, and it will serve as the official course description. The course may take the form of faculty-supervised research, study, or a project. This course may be repeated for credit.

LAS371 Drawing and Rendering for Theater (2 credits)

This course is designed to give students the essential drawing skills needed in rendering clear and informative compositions for use in theater production. Prerequisite: SPD111B or by instructor consent.

LAS522 Seminar in Performing Arts Management (3 credits)

This course sequence prepares students to play leadership roles in the field of performing arts management. Students will learn the key concepts and terminology in the field, basic structural components of performing arts institutions, and essential managerial knowledge for running a range of performing arts companies. Throughout these courses, students will simulate real-world situations in managing a performing arts company or school. The course sequence also emphasizes entrepreneurial thinking in today’s fast-changing world. These courses feature a slate of guest speakers with different expertise.

LAS550 Research Methodology in the Arts (1 credit each)

This graduate-level course sequence helps students develop the skills necessary to develop successful master-level compositions. The sequence will give students an idea of the step-by-step process of thesis writing: from question and conceptualization to research, to organization, to dissertation and presentation. Work in class consists mostly of short writing assignments, peer evaluations, and readings. Through lecture and discussion, students will analyze and examine literature in an effort to improve their own writing. At the end of the sequence, students will conceive a preliminary proposal for their master thesis project.

LAS570 Media Technology for the Arts (2 credits)

This course introduces students to two areas of media technology that play a fundamental role in the production and presentation of various performing arts genres: audio and video. Through hands-on practice, projects, and collaboration, students will develop the familiarity and skills needed to develop and implement a sound design for a theater production and to create meaningful and artistic films in the context of performing arts. By the end of this course students will not only have gained essential knowledge respective to each field but also be able to integrate audio and video skills in a culminating work.

Chinese Language and Culture

CLC101, 102 Beginning Chinese I, II (4)

Beginning Chinese is designed for non-heritage Chinese speakers. Through interactive classroom activities and practice, students will acquire fundamental knowledge of the Chinese language and develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Upon completion of these courses, students should be capable of basic communication in a Mandarin-speaking environment. Students are also expected to have an active reading and speaking vocabulary of 400 Chinese characters. Prerequisite: None.

CLC111, 112 Elementary Chinese I, II (4)

Designed as an introductory course sequence for heritage speakers as well as for learners who have completed CLC102 or the equivalent. Building upon the students' oral/aural abilities, these courses develop students' competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Mandarin Chinese, with special emphasis on reading and speaking. By the end of these courses, students are expected to apply in daily use an active vocabulary of 800 Chinese characters, have a good command of basic idiomatic expressions and sentence patterns, be able to converse with ease on familiar topics, and be able to write short narratives and personal communications. Prerequisite: CLC102 or the equivalent.

CLC131/CIV102 Chinese Civilization (3 credits)

A survey of the salient features and legacies of Chinese civilization throughout China’s five millennia of history. Topics include literary, religious, and philosophical traditions; the transformation of China’s political, educational, and examination systems; and the radical cultural changes in the 20th century.

CLC211, 212 Intermediate Chinese I, II (4)

Holistically develops students' reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the Chinese language at the intermediate level. Students are expected to have an active vocabulary of 1,600 of the most commonly used Chinese characters, including 200 idioms and phrases; be able to read expository and narrative writings with familiar vocabulary; have the speaking skills to cope with unfamiliar real-life situations; be able to write straightforward narrations and descriptions; and demonstrate a detailed understanding of Chinese culture and society. Prerequisite: CLC112 or equivalent.

CLC274 Chinese Painting and Calligraphy (2 credits)

Drawing upon 5,000 years of Chinese philosophical and artistic traditions, this course aims to give students both the technical skills of how to use a Chinese brush and ink as well as the deeper cultural meaning behind the art form. Topics include brush control, stroke order and direction, stroke quality, and traditional composition. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

CLC311, 312 Advanced Chinese I, II (4)

Further develops listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese, with an emphasis on vocabulary building and developing lifelong reading habits. Students explore various ways to acquire vocabulary while gaining relevant cultural knowledge. They also study representative authentic articles in modern Chinese from various genres and develop the ability to use different reading strategies for different purposes. Furthermore, students are exposed to opportunities to summarize, explain, and persuade through effective writing. Multimedia and online resources are used extensively. Prerequisite: CLC212 or by instructor consent.

CLC331/HUM222 Topics in Chinese History (3 credits)

An in-depth study of the Qin and Han dynasties, Tang and Song dynasties, or Ming and Qing dynasties. Topics include literary, religious, and philosophical traditions; major events and historical figures; royal families and their roles throughout history; and the transformation of China’s economic, political, and bureaucratic examination systems. Prerequisite: CLC131 or by instructor consent.

CLC411, 412 Introduction to Classical Chinese I, II (4)

This course sequence serves as a transition from the contemporary Mandarin to classical Chinese language (wen yan wen). Through introduction of selected elementary levels of classical Chinese essays and poetry, students develop basic reading and comprehension skills in classical Chinese. Students study not only syntactic patterns and vocabulary of classical Chinese but also the cultural values, philosophies, and history behind the texts. The course also develops students' skills in reading and writing in modern Mandarin. Prerequisite: CLC312 or by instructor consent.

CLC421, 422 Chinese Language Arts I, II (4)

This course sequence is designed for students who have completed primary education in a Chinese-speaking country or who have completed the two-year sequence of Classical Chinese at Fei Tian. This course sequence builds on students' native language proficiency and aims to extend and expand their linguistic and cultural knowledge. In particular, it develops students' ability to read classical Chinese and to write in modern Chinese. It also exposes students to the cultural traditions of China. Prerequisite: CLC412 or by instructor consent.

CLC423, 424 Chinese Language Arts III, IV- (4)

This course sequence is intended for students who have completed 8 to 9 years of education in a Chinese-speaking country or who have completed the two-year sequence of Chinese Language Arts I and II at Fei Tian. Building upon students' native proficiency, the course sequence further develops students' ability to read both prose and poetry in classical Chinese and to write in formal modern Chinese. It also exposes students to the cultural traditions of China. Prerequisite: CLC422 or by instructor consent.

CLC431, 432 Readings in Chinese Literature I, II (4)

A focused study of the dominant literary genres and representative works of classical Chinese literature, including pre-Qin essays, Tang poetry, Song ci (lyrics), Yuan qu (verses), and fiction from the Ming and Qing dynasties. Students learn to appreciate and analyze major classical Chinese literary works and apply rhetorical skills in their writings. Designed for native speakers or advanced Chinese learners. All readings are in Chinese. Prerequisites: CLC424 or by instructor consent.

15.10 Music Courses

MUS001R, 002R, 003R, 004R Concert Attendance I, II, III, IV (0 credit)

This sequence requires students to attend concerts on campus each semester. Attendance will be noted at the entrance to the auditorium. Those who fail to fulfill the minimum requirement need to make it up in the following semester. Students are required to complete MUS001R, 002R, 003R, and 004R each twice. Pass/No Pass grading scale.

MUS005 Remedial Ear Training (0 credit)

This remedial course develops basic aural and dictation proficiency to prepare students for MUS101A.

MUS011 Review of Music Theory (0 credit)

Through listening, playing, singing, and writing, students will review the study of rhythms, intervals, motifs, phrases, melodies, and chords. This remedial course develops students' competency in basic music theory to prepare them for more advanced courses.

MUS101A/B Ear Training A/B (1 credit each)

This course sequence solidifies students' understanding of theoretical principles through aural exercises such as sight singing, rhythmic exercises, and dictation. The co-requisite for MUS101A is MUS111A and the co-requisite for MUS101B is MUS111B.

MUS102A/B Keyboard Skills A/B (1 credit each)

This first course offers piano lessons in a group setting. Students will develop the ability to read music and play simple pieces with proper technique while relating the music to theory that they have learned. The second course focuses on the development of keyboard musicianship, including basic pianistic facility and ease at the keyboard, sight-reading and harmonization in treble and bass clefs, basic music theory, and ensemble playing.

MUS111A/B Western Music Theory A/B (2 credits each)

The first course in this sequence introduces students to four-part writing for all diatonic chords and will include study of figured bass, non-harmonic tones, the various functions of the phrase model, and motivic identification. The second course will study small musical structures like periods and sentences, harmonic sequences, Neapolitan 6 chords, augmented 6th chords, and applied chords and modulation.

MUS120R, 220R, 320R, 420R Orchestra I, II, III, IV (2 credits each)

In these applied music courses, students develop their instrumental skills, ensemble techniques, and musicianship skills through orchestral playing. Students majoring in Performance are required to repeat MUS120R, 220R, 320R, and 420R for a total of 4 credits each. Select students may participate in side-by-side concerts with music faculty and other performances in the New York area and beyond.

MUS121R, 221R, 321R, 421R Major Instrument (Western) I, II, III, IV (4 credits each)

Through enrolling in this course sequence, a student majoring in a Western musical instrument is entitled to one 60-minute private lesson per week. Students majoring in Performance are required to repeat MUS121R, 221R, 321R, and 421R for a total of 28 credits.

MUS122R, 222R, 322R, 422R Major Instrument (Chinese) I, II, III, IV (4 credits each)

Through enrolling in this course sequence, a student majoring in a Chinese musical instrument is entitled to one 60-minute private lesson per week. Students majoring in Performance are required to repeat MUS122R, 222R, 322R, and 422R for a total of 28 credits.

MUS123R, 223R, 323R, 423R Chamber Music I, II, III, IV (1 credit each)

This studio course sequence expands students' ensemble repertoire, improves ensemble skills, and encourages more personal responsibility in creating polished artistic performances. Students will receive coaching from music faculty on assigned repertoire to be performed in a concert. Students majoring in Performance are required to repeat MUS223R, 323R, and 423R, for a total of 2 credits each. Piano majors are additionally required to take 123R, for a total of 2 credits.

MUS124R, 224R, 324R, 424R Concert Practice I, II, III, IV (0.5 credit each)

In this course, students meet once a week in a master class-like situation to perform for faculty members and peers and to listen to their peers' performances. Students majoring in Performance are required to repeat MUS124R, 224R, and 324R for a total of 1 credit each.

MUS125R, 225R, 325R Studio Piano I, II, III (1 credit each)

Private instruction in piano for non-piano majors. Enrolled students will have one private 30-minute lesson per week.

MUS128R, 228R, 328R, 428R Instrumental Accompaniment I, II, III, IV (1 credit each)

This applied course sequence provides students experience in accompanying individuals or groups in studio and rehearsal settings, plus in subsequent performance. The time commitment is comparable to that of ensemble participation. Piano students collaborate with vocalists and instrumentalists in the department and sometimes with professional musicians.

MUS129R, 229R, 329R, 429R Dance Class Accompaniment I, II, III, IV (1 credit each)

This studio course sequence is designed to prepare students to accompany dance classes competently and properly. A student will be assigned to different dance classes to accompany the class to get hands-on experience as well as to develop and broaden the skills and professional competencies of the piano accompanist, addressing the needs of all those intending to undertake a career as a piano accompanist in dance classes.

MUS141 History of Western Music (Overview) (1 credit)

This overview course provides students the tools to understand the different music periods through history and familiarize students with the main composers, music literature, and genres.

MUS142 History of Western Music (Medieval - Early Baroque) (2 credits)

This survey course of the history of Western music offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the Medieval until the Middle Baroque period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts during these periods of Western music history.

MUS155, 255, 355 Music Practicum I, II, III (3 credits each)

These elective courses are designed to give students the opportunity to gain practical performing experience through taking part in the orchestras of Shen Yun Performing Arts or other professional ensembles.

MUS201A/B Advanced Ear Training A/B (1 credit each)

The first course in this sequence improves students' fluency in the materials covered in MUS101B while developing their aural skills with respect to the theoretical topics covered in MUS211A Advanced Western Music Theory A. The second course focuses on dictation exercises comprising harmonic progressions, cross rhythms, syncopations, and smaller subdivision of beats.

MUS202A/B Advanced Keyboard Skills A/B (1 credit each)

This studio course sequence develops students' keyboard skills at the intermediate level, focusing on increasing finger dexterity and further acquisition of functional theory-related keyboard skills. In the first course, students learn to read and play music notated in different clefs as well as scores for transposing instruments. In the second course, students learn to read and play full scores for chamber and symphonic works.

MUS211A/B Advanced Western Music Theory A/B (2 credits each)

In addition to the study of more advanced harmonic progressions, this course sequence focuses on the function each harmony and melody expresses as well as the relation to the larger form at hand. Included in the study of larger forms are ternary, rondo, and sonata forms. Phrase structure and small forms are addressed in depth from melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic perspectives. The course also consolidates students' knowledge of 19th-century chromatic harmony while introducing 18th-century imitative counterpoint and 20th-century harmony.

MUS226A/B Piano Accompanying A/B (1 credit each)

This applied course sequence will foster the keyboard and sight-reading proficiency a collaborative pianist requires. The student gains experience working with one or more players in communicating and articulating musical ideas, developing the appropriate musical sensitivity, and following a different set of conventions in the approach to playing the piano.

MUS241 History of Western Music (High Baroque - Classical) (2 credits)

This course offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the High Baroque to the Classical period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts of these periods of Western music history.

MUS242 History of Western Music (Romantic - Contemporary) (2 credits)

This course offers an in-depth view of the representative musical styles from the Romantic to the contemporary period, while studying in detail the main issues and concepts of these periods of Western music history.

MUS244, 245 Chinese Music I, II (2 credits each)

The first course of this sequence focuses on traditional Chinese folk songs, ballads, and regional operas. Students learn to understand, identify, and sing different genres of folk songs that are authentic to their regional styles. The second course introduces students to traditional Chinese instrumental music and singing-dance music. Through exploring the unique sound qualities of each Chinese instrument and representative repertoire, students can draw parallels to their own instruments. Embedded workshops instruct students in how to play Chinese music in a distinctly Chinese style on their own instruments, Western or Chinese.

MUS311 Form and Analysis (2 credits)

This course aims to develop the analytical skills students need to study large-scale Classical works from prominent composers such as Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. The focus is on approaching tonal music as an instrumental performer. Select orchestral and chamber repertoire from the Romantic period will also be studied using these skills.

MUS326A/B Chinese Instrument Class A/B (1 credit each)

This one-year sequence is designed to help Western instrument majors gain proficiency on a chosen Chinese instrument to an elementary-to-intermediate level. Students learn the basic techniques, proper hand positions and body posture, maintenance of the instrument, and interpretation of a chosen repertoire. The second half of the sequence consolidates the basic techniques while developing students' command of a musically more challenging repertoire.

MUS341 Orchestral Literature (2 credits)

This is a survey of orchestral literature from the early Classical period to the present, focusing on the changing roles of orchestral instruments, performance styles and techniques, and the interpretative or compositional philosophies of the composers studied. Prerequisites: MUS241 and MUS242.

MUS344 Piano Literature (2 credits)

This course is a chronological in-depth survey of music for the piano, from the Baroque period to the contemporary era. Through lectures, reading and listening assignments, analysis and performance projects, students explore period instruments, musical styles, repertoire, and performance practice. This course also covers the socio-cultural context that influenced major composers and their works.

MUS345 Interpretation and Performance of East-West Music (2 credits)

East-West music is a combination of traditional Chinese music with Western orchestral methods. This course examines the theoretical basis of East-West music as well as the individual Chinese and Western elements of this unique style. Through analysis of different repertoire, students will be able to interpret this style of music, and ultimately, perform it with the nuanced musicality that it demands.

MUS350 Independent Study in Music (1–4 credits)

This course gives students an opportunity to investigate a topic outside the current music curriculum. All independent study courses must be approved in advance and be closely supervised by a faculty member. An independent study proposal must include a course outline developed through consultation between the student and faculty supervisor, and it will serve as the official course description. The course may take the form of faculty-supervised research, study, or a project. This course may be repeated for credit.

MUS351 Junior Recital (0 credit)

Junior Recital (30 minutes) is required of every BM student majoring in Performance. The recital is usually given at the end of a student’s junior year and is open to the public. Required concurrent courses: MUS321R or MUS322R. Pass/No Pass grading scale.

MUS361 Chinese Music Seminar (2 credits)

This is an upper-division seminar course that discusses important topics in Chinese music, including musical origins and history, genres, morphology, musical structure, notation systems, and aesthetics.

MUS371 Internship (1–3 credits)

The purpose of an internship is to let students apply what they have learned in school and also gain valuable work experience in a professional environment. An internship usually lasts for five weeks with 20 to 40 hours of work per week. This course may be repeated once for additional credit. Prerequisite: Junior class standing.

MUS425R Studio Piano IV (2 credits)

Private instruction in piano for non-piano majors. Enrolled students will have one private 60-minute lesson per week. MUS425R may each be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

MUS450 Research Paper (4 credits)

This course offers seniors the opportunity to write a research paper (at least 25 double-spaced, typewritten pages) on a music-related topic of their own choice with the guidance of an instructor.

MUS451 Senior Recital (0 credit)

Senior Recital (60 minutes) is required of every BM student majoring in Performance. The recital is usually given at the end of the student’s senior year and is open to the public. Required concurrent courses: MUS421R or MUS422R. Pass/No Pass grading scale.

MUS452 Senior Project (4 credits)

This course offers students an opportunity to develop their creative skills through conceiving and completing an independent project, such as a composition, recital, or other music-related creative endeavor. The project scope requires instructor approval.

MUS455 Advanced Music Practicum IV (4 credits)

This course is open to seniors wishing to tour or spend a season with a professional ensemble such as a Shen Yun orchestra to gain hands-on artistic and/or managerial experience. Prerequisite: Instructor consent; 3 credits from each of MUS155, 255, and 355 is preferred.

15.11 Stage Production and Design Courses

SPD101 Fundamentals of Stagecraft and Production (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic elements and principles of theater production. Topics include set, lighting, and sound design, production safety, and basic concepts of stage management. Course activities include lectures, tests, and a final exam.

SPD111A/B Drawing A/B (2 credits each)

This course consists of the study and practice of basic drawing elements such as line, value, texture, composition, one- and two-point perspective, and color. Students will learn to apply these elements to develop concepts for graphic design. Tools used include pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, and colored pencils or markers.

SPD120 Introduction to Digital Media (2 credits)

This course introduces the basic elements of digital media and specifically the process and workflow of digital media design for the theater. Through lectures, detailed analysis, case studies, and projects, students learn how to break down scripts and present story concepts. They explore how visual techniques can be used to communicate emotions, share stories and new ideas, and expand the imagination.

SPD140 Introduction to Theater History and Practices (3 credits)

This course surveys the fundamental elements of theater, including acting techniques, the roles of the director and producer, and stage and costume design. It also gives students a sweeping historical tour of theater, from ancient Greece to Medieval Europe and from the Yuan Dynasty in China to the European Renaissance and the present. Through reading/watching plays and writing critiques, students will gain a better understanding of and appreciation for the traditions behind any theatrical performance they may attend.

SPD150, 250, 350, 450 Rehearsal & Performance Production I, II, III, IV (1 credit each)

The basic intent of these courses is that students will learn the responsibilities and processes of preparing for a live stage production by working as a member of a production crew. Each student is required to take this course every year when he/she is assigned to a specific but different production task, so that he/she can gain practical experience in all major aspects of production.

SPD155, 255, 355 Theater Production Practice I, II, III (3 credits each)

These three courses are designed to provide students opportunities to gain hands-on professional experience producing and executing stage production from home venues to real-world theaters. Students can participate in many production roles, collaborating with technicians, production crew, designers, and other artists in a professional environment. In the process, students will enhance and broaden their overall stage production knowledge and skills beyond what can be learned in a classroom.

SPD202 Fundamentals of Electricity and Electronics (3 credits)

This course introduces the basic concepts and principles of electricity with an emphasis on hands-on experiments. Students are exposed to a variety of real-life applications, and are encouraged to apply the knowledge and techniques they’ve learned to various experiments. Students constantly improve their understanding of technology and engineering by developing their analytical and critical thinking. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to conduct basic electrical tests and measurements, perform basic troubleshooting, and draw and interpret results.

SPD211A/B Drafting A/B (2 credits each)

This sequence introduces the student to the drafting standards and styles of the theatre design industry. Students begin with hand drafting to learn the language of line and gain an understanding of space, volume, and scale. As they progress, they will learn computer-aided drafting (CAD) via AutoCAD techniques and will practice generating accurate, measured drawings such as ground plans, sections, elevations, and construction drawings. The purpose is to develop the basic graphic communication skills needed to turn design concepts and ideas into practical theatre applications.

SPD212 Scenic and Set Design I (3 credits)

This course explores the fundamentals of scenic and set design for theater, covering floor plan design, scenic lighting design, stage design, and the building process of set scenery. Students will apply the technical skills discussed in the lectures to their own hands-on projects.

SPD213 Lighting Design and Production I (3 credits)

This course mainly focuses on the fundamentals of conventional stage lighting, such as how the theatrical lighting field developed, the theatrical environment, and the different jobs available in theatre. It also offers some basic training in fundamental stage lighting techniques for theatrical work and touches upon stage lighting production and stage lighting design. Course activities include lectures, discussions, assignments, and studio/hands-on projects. Prerequisite: SPD202.

SPD220 Digital Media Production: Techniques (2 credits)

Building on the foundation laid in SPD120 Introduction to Digital Media, this course focuses on introducing the entire video production process—from pre-production to production to post-production. Students are expected to be able to break down scripts and produce basic video products by the end of the course. Prerequisite SPD120.

SPD221 Digital Media: 2D Matte Painting (3 credits)

This course empowers students with proven strategies and techniques to create realistic and dynamic backgrounds. Students explore how to use photo references, artworks, and patterns to eventually produce their own portfolio of photorealistic backgrounds using professional workflows.

SPD223 Digital Media: Filming and Editing (4 credits)

This course allows students to explore the art of cinematography through essential visual communication and video production elements like lighting, pre- and post-green screen production, basic audio mixing, and non-linear editing. Through hands-on exercises both in the studio and on location, students learn to combine the technical aspects of cinematography—including ISO, WB, FPS, shutter angle, resolution, and recording format—with the aesthetic considerations of lens choice, framing, composition, camera perspective, and movement to create compelling visual images and stories. Prerequisite: SPD220.

SPD227 Introduction to Photography (2 credits)

This course introduces the concepts, principles, and practical techniques of the field of photography. Students explore the elements that make an effective photo, including subject choice, composition, camera position, lighting, and special techniques. Students are required to complete a series of projects to demonstrate the knowledge and skills they have learned.

SPD311 Scene Painting and Figure Drawing (2 credits)

This course focuses on developing basic drawing ability into skillful competence, eventually allowing students to communicate effectively through clear renderings of their visual conceptions. Students will be trained on digital computer systems as well as a variety of classical tools, including but not limited to pencils, pen and ink, charcoal, colored pencils, and markers. Prerequisite SPD111B.

SPD312 Scenic and Set Design II (3 credits)

This course explores advanced topics of scenic and set design for theater. It covers topics ranging from theatrical drawings to different sceneries and creating designs with sketches and CAD. Students will have hands-on experience in stage design. Prerequisite SPD212.

SPD313 Lighting Design and Production II (3 credits)

This course focuses on the advanced training and knowledge needed to transition from a crew member to a more skillful and knowledgeable lighting designer. It retains its focus on conventional lighting, though modern lighting technology will also be introduced, especially in relation to CAD software. It also includes the introduction of the complete workflow of stage lighting design and the core areas of stage lighting production. Prerequisite SPD213.

SPD314A/B Live Sound A/B (2 credits each)

This course sequence explores the musical, acoustical, and technical aspects of sound reinforcement for live performances. The aim of this course is for students to learn how to amplify and accurately recreate the sound of any given instrument in a variety of different locations with different acoustics, using a range of the most common tools available to the modern sound engineer.

SPD315 Drafting C (Vectorworks) (2 credits)

This course covers the basics of Vectorworks application in theatre design using a combination of lectures, in-class lab time and take-home projects to explore the various 2D and 3D tools, modeling techniques, and correct workflows in Vectorworks. Students use the tools to communicate their design ideas and collaborate with others. This course is intended for the student who is already proficient in standard theatrical drafting techniques. Prerequisite SPD211B.

SPD316 Costume Design I (3 credits)

An introduction to the process of costume design, including studying design elements, production organization from a design perspective, and practical historical research. The purpose is to enable the student to gain practical design experience by demonstrating their ability to analyze a script, complete historical research, attend production meetings, sketch, render a design concept, and defend that concept to the class.

SPD317 Sound Recording Techniques (2 credits)

This course is an introduction to the theory and practical applications of the tools and technology used in the art of live and studio music recording. Emphasis will be on how to best record different classical musical instruments, the human voice, as well as small and large orchestral ensembles content. Prerequisite SPD314A.

SPD324 3D Modeling, Texturing, and Animation (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals and concepts of animation in three dimensions. It is focused on introducing 3D animation software and developing students' existing motion skills. Students begin by exploring the concepts of non-organic animation, organic animation, and facial and emotional animation. Emphasis is on practicing the 12 basic principles of animation to demonstrate a strong sense of weight and emotion through movement.

SPD325 Digital Media: Compositing (3 credits)

This project-based course helps students build their portfolios as they explore the fundamentals of feature film, lighting, and how to integrate 3D elements within a live action scene. Students learn about color theory, three-point lighting, interior and exterior lighting, as well as how to light a character and manipulate reflections to create a believable shot for live action integration. Students can use the rendered elements in their final compositing shots to add an extra layer of creativity to their portfolios. Prerequisite: SPD220.

SPD327 Rendering and Projection Techniques (2 credits)

This course introduces students to the use of technologies that produce high-definition live-concert video productions. Students hone their proficiency with broadcast-quality 4K production equipment. The course addresses lighting for video, advanced camera operation, directing, and advanced switching. Students also focus on interaction and cooperation with performers, actors, and crew members.

SPD328A/B Video Production for the Theater A/B (2 credits each)

This sequence begins with the skills needed to plan and complete a multi-camera professional studio production. Students practice with cameras, microphones, sound effects, properties, lighting instruments and controls, audio consoles, and switcher-faders. The second course is a workshop for field production of a nonfiction documentary with emphasis on research, pre-planning, and writing. The course combines theory, history, and practice by presenting screenings, readings, lectures, discussion, and hands-on demonstrations. Prerequisite: SPD220.

SPD330 Stage Management: Concepts and Practice (3 credits)

This course introduces the concepts and practices of theatrical stage management with emphasis on the fundamental skills, duties, and responsibilities required of a stage manager, as well as the procedures pertaining to the theatrical production process. Industry-standard vocabulary will be taught so students can communicate with proficiency in a theater setting. Students participate in classroom discussions and activities as well as in projects that offer practical experience.

SPD351 Independent Study in Stage Production and Design (2 credits)

Independent Study consists of faculty-supervised research, study, readings, or hands-on projects into areas of study outside the traditional course offerings of the College. It offers students the opportunity to investigate a topic independently, under the close supervision of a faculty member.

SPD414A/B Advanced Live Sound A/B (2 credits each)

This sequence, designed for students who have completed SPD314A&B Live Sound A&B, further explores the professional aspects of sound reinforcement for live performances. The aim is for students to continue learning the skillset and tools required to become professional live sound engineers. Prerequisite SPD314B.

SPD416 Costume Design II (3 credits)

This course provides instruction in the advanced techniques of theatrical costume design, including studying the typical fashions and costume styles of each dynasty in Chinese history and throughout Western history. Topics include figure drawing, how the elements and principles of design relate to and are utilized in costume design, collaboration, script analysis, research methods, the costume design process, character analysis, the function and purpose of costumes in theater, fabric selection, rendering techniques, and the use of various media. Prerequisite: SPD316.

SPD426A/B Digital Media Portfolio A/B (4 credits each)

This sequence provides students the conceptual and practical foundations required to produce their own portfolio projects. Students first start developing a short script based on a previous story idea, then create storyboards and a preproduction plan. They find their own footage and demonstrate their skills in editing, sound design, and graphics to tell a story. Students complete at least 24 hours of documented production work, and are expected to complete a five- to ten-minute digital media piece for their student portfolio. A résumé and reel will also be presented and reviewed.

SPD455 Theater Production Practicum (3 credits)

This course is designed for senior-year students to participate in a number of stage productions during which they assume more active roles and responsibilities in a real-world theater setting. Specifically, students have opportunities to participate in rehearsals, campus festivals, stage events, as well as tours through the College’s partnership with Shen Yun Performing Arts and other professional companies. Students will contribute to the design, construction, and presentation of live Chinese dance and music shows at premier venues around the world. Prerequisite: SPD355.

SPD456A/B Senior Project: Portfolio, Production, and Thesis A/B (4 credits each)

In this course sequence, each student devises and completes a capstone research project. The topic of the project is determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member. The student demonstrates the project in real-world stage production, and documents it as a portfolio and thesis. The thesis is a substantial, typically multi-chapter paper.

15.12 Graduate Classical Chinese Dance Courses

Graduate Level Courses

CCD501R Graduate Classical Chinese Dance (4 credits)

This graduate-level course aims to refine students' artistic expression and execution of classical Chinese dance. It focuses on distinctions in movement articulation with emphasis on shen-dai-shou (the body leads the hands, 身帶手), kua-dai-tui (the hips lead the legs, 胯帶腿), and the integration of the outer form with the inner spirit. Students practice complex sequences of movements with attention to expressive clarity and amplified expression. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better command of the technical and stylistic variations in classical Chinese dance. Students in the MFA program are expected to complete CCD501R four times for a total of 16 credits.

CCD502 Integration of Dance and Music (1 credit)

This course gives MFA students an opportunity to further develop their musicality and explore the connection between dance and music. Through guest lectures and discussions with composers and conductors, students are exposed to the creative process of music composition so as to better understand what goes into designing a musical piece for dance, and specifically for classical Chinese dance and Chinese folk and ethnic dance. In this workshop-based course, students also have the opportunity to choreograph their own dances pieces in response to different styles of music.

CCD503 Acting For Stage (1 credit)

This graduate-level acting course focuses on refining acting skills with respect to clarity of expression for a variety of performance settings. It gives students the opportunity to practice and refine their performing skills by revisiting fundamental acting concepts and engaging in a wide range of improvisational exercises. Through this course, students will primarily study the portrayal of characters and situations with reference to Chinese culture and history.

CCD511 Graduate Choreography I (2 credits)

This course introduces the expressive dancer to new ways of thinking and creating. In their first year of the graduate dance program, students expand their artistic potential and explore how to make their choreographic work more compelling. By tailoring thematic movement sequences to specific personas and considering other theatrical factors, students will learn to view their work as a whole, and most importantly, from the audience’s standpoint. This course also instills in students an appreciation for the reiterative creative process.

CCD512 Advanced Pedagogy I (2 credits)

Since teaching itself is an art that requires considerable planning and collaboration, students in this course work extensively with their peers to develop appropriate course materials, provide corrective remedies for movements, and experiment with various teaching methodologies. They also observe different pedagogical contexts, such as for teaching children and for grade-level pupils. Through discussion and putting their ideas into practice, students can become confident and discerning dance teachers able to conduct classes that are both purposeful and engaging.

CCD521R Chinese Dance Repertory I (2 credits)

This advanced course focuses on detailed technical studies of narration within a dance context, precision in the depiction of characters, and efficient and organized methods for rehearsals of a dance group. This is a very interactive course, allowing students to experiment and express the creativity they developed in previous repertoire courses. May culminate in performance. Students in the MFA program are expected to complete CCD521R twice for a total of 4 credits.

CCD541 Chinese Dance Throughout the Ages (3 credits)

This course explores the philosophical, cultural, and aesthetic underpinnings of classical Chinese dance and Chinese folk and ethnic dance. Topics include: the origins and aesthetic basis of Chinese dance, the influence of traditional Chinese ideologies on dance, the systematization and methodology of Chinese dance, the cross-pollination between classical Chinese dance and ethnic and folk dances, and the implications of the revival of traditional Chinese dance in the context of globalization in the 21st century.

CCD541 Seminar: Dance in Cultural Context (2 credits)

This seminar approaches the study of dance as a means to better understand different cultures through the historical, cultural, and social contexts of a dance piece. It helps students bridge the gap between Eastern and Western dance traditions and better understand the role of Chinese dance in the global arts community. One focus of the course is to enable students to articulate differences in dance traditions, including dance concepts and terms, in both English and Chinese. Students also practice communicating their experience of dance—from systematic explanations of dance fundamentals to the description of the emotions, aesthetics, and cultural implications—to help others better appreciate classical Chinese dance.

CCD542 Topics in Chinese Dance Ethnography (2 credits)

This seminar course is designed to address various topics regarding selected Chinese dance forms. Students will study and analyze social, cultural, and political influences on ethnic dance forms in the past and present. Through a series of workshops, guest instructors will introduce students to various dance styles, providing them with direct exposure through active participation. Workshops include movement analysis and discussion of cultural connotations that build the underlying dance aesthetic. Topics will be determined based on guest speaker availability.

CCD551 Graduate Independent Study or Project (1–6 credits)

This course allows graduate students to explore topics of individual or professional interest that do not fall within the standard curriculum. Each independent study course is flexible and personalized—designed by each student with his/her guiding instructor—so that students can get the most out of their specific studies and achieve their intended goals.

CCD555 Graduate Practicum (4 credits)

The practicum allows graduate students to build their professional experience with leading companies and institutions. Students gain first-hand experience related to their career goals and build professional relationships invaluable to their future careers. Students may choose to have a practicum emphasis in performance, choreography, pedagogy, production, artistic management, or any other specialization directly related to their graduate studies. All students receive one-on-one guidance and mentoring from assigned instructors or preceptors. All practicums are designed to help students build a strong work ethic and enhance their professional knowledge. Students who wish to acquire more practical experience may repeat this course.

CCD571 Holistic Health for Artists (2 credits)

This course aims to introduce the concept of holistic health from both Western and Eastern perspectives with emphasis on concepts that support the learning and performing of classical Chinese dance. Students will finish the course with basic knowledge of health as a holistic integration of body, mind, and spirit. This course will include lectures, group discussions, and mentored research projects.

CCD601 Graduate Classical Chinese Dance Studio Practice (4 credits)

This graduate course in classical Chinese dance challenges students to achieve complete assimilation of spirit and form while performing composite routines that require both expressive versatility and technical competency. The course allows students to hone their artistry and technique through self-tailored routines and stylistic solos. Apart from fundamental training, students will also receive mentorship and engage in movement exploration for particular dance pieces. They will be prompted to reflect upon their achievements and develop their own artistic forte, as part of becoming a well-rounded and distinguished dancer.

CCD611 Graduate Choreography II (2 credits)

This course is the culmination of students' previous studies in choreography and is designed to help students conceive new ideas while invoking within them a sense of traditional aesthetics. Students will delve deeper into the realm of artistic creation by critiquing works on various levels—from historical narrative works to contemporary artistic interpretations, and from the effective development of choreographic elements to what makes a dance piece poignant and powerful. Prerequisite: CCD511 or by instructor consent.

CCD612 Advanced Pedagogy II (2 credits)

This course focuses on application, analysis, and creation. Through opportunities to teach full-length classes, students will be able to analyze and evaluate their peers while developing their own philosophies and teaching ideals. The course trains students to examine the contextual complexities of dance education and to develop course materials with respect to higher education. By the end of this course, students will hand in a portfolio that recounts their pedagogical findings and designs for a systematic course in classical Chinese dance. Prerequisite: CCD512 or by instructor consent.

CCD613 Perspectives on Dance Aesthetics (2 credits)

This is a seminar course. Through a series of lecture topics, graduates will be given opportunities to develop their aesthetic tastes and refine their preferences. Students will be exposed to a range of repertoire; afterwards, they will analyze them within the context of aesthetic principles, including Chinese artistic values. Ultimately, this course aims to motivate students to appreciate aesthetic ideals that have inspired artists for millennia and to provide new wisdom to fuel their artistic goals.

CCD621 Chinese Dance Repertory II (4 credits)

This course allows students to hone their expressive abilities through rigorous rehearsal and performance. Students will be under the direction of experienced choreographers and professionals. The course explores ways in which the dancer deepens his or her connection with the audience on an emotional as well as a spiritual level. This course culminates in a final recital showcasing a variety of student-selected works accompanied by a live orchestra. Prerequisite: CCD521R or by instructor consent.

CCD631 Dance Kinesiology (2 credits)

An investigation into the field of dance science, this course introduces students to the human skeletal system; joint biomechanics; muscle origin, insertion, and action; and the concept of tensegrity in biomechanics. It explores the principles of physical structure, function, and dynamic alignment as they relate to dance performance enhancement and injury prevention. The course also touches on healthy living concepts such as nutrition and holistic mind-body connections. Course activities include lectures, class discussion, skill and technique demonstrations, and relevant audiovisual content.

CCD661 Graduate Internship (1–4 credits)

Through internships, graduate students can think more deeply about their own career development and connect their academic learning with hands-on professional experience. Students can apply to dance companies, schools and institutions, media groups, and other hosts to find internships that fit their individual specialties and interests. Internships may or may not be paid, depending on the host institution. Other than completing assigned duties and demonstrating professional competencies, graduate students will need to reflect on their personal strengths, where they need to improve, and what actions they should take to achieve their goals. While internships are not required for graduation, they are strongly encouraged.

CCD671 Psychology in Dance Education (2 credits)

This course introduces the essentials of psychological principles, theories, and concepts as they apply to the educational environment related to classical Chinese dance. Through various activities, students will explore how to structure effective pedagogical approaches in order to meet the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of learners and to forge a positive learning atmosphere in dance education.

CCD750 Master’s Project (1–6 credits)

The master’s project is a year-long endeavor that allows students to do research and contribute knowledge to the field of dance. Students work with their assigned thesis advisor to determine their topic and method of investigation. They consult with their advisor frequently and have the opportunity to collaborate with students from other programs. By the end of the year students should have completed their project, which will be presented through a concert, demonstration, and/or written documentation. The goal of the master’s project is to validate the student’s ability to investigate and bring to light new perspectives and understandings within the field of classical Chinese dance. Students should complete CCD750 for a total of 6 credits.

DAN502 Techniques of Other Dance Systems I (2 credits)

The course is designed to broaden students' range of skills in a dance system other than classical Chinese dance. The dance system may differ from year to year.

DAN602 Techniques of Other Dance Systems II (2 credits)

As a continuation of DAN502, this course builds upon the skills students practiced in the previous course. For the ballet rotation, the course introduces intermediate-level techniques and routines that require more control, coordination, and technical proficiency. Students will also be introduced to classic repertoire. Prerequisite: DAN502 within the same dance system, or by instructor consent.

15.13 Graduate Dance Courses

DAB501R Advanced Classical Ballet I (4 credits) Fall Spring

As a part of a two-year studio MFA program, the course offers professional level of Classical Ballet class. The class will include advanced Ballet barre, center, and cross floor work. The excerpts from classical ballet repertoire will be taught in the center and cross floor combinations. Students are expected to know the names of the ballet syllabus, pronunciations, and the proper use of the movement. Prerequisite: Professional Dance Experience or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN501R Advanced Classical Chinese Dance I (4 credits) Fall Spring

This first-year graduate-level course aims to refine students' expression and execution of classical Chinese dance and related techniques. The course focuses on clarity of movement, distinctions in articulation, and the integration of the outer form with the inner spirit. Students practice complex sequences of movements with attention to expressive clarity and amplified expression. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better command of the technical and stylistic variations in classical Chinese dance.

DAN510 Advanced Pedagogy I (2 credits) Fall

The purpose of this course is to train students to become confident and critical dance teachers who can conduct classes that are both purposeful and engaging. Because teaching itself is an art that requires considerable planning and collaboration, students will work extensively to develop and prescribe appropriate course material, provide corrective remedies for movements, and experiment with various teaching methodologies. Students will also observe various contexts in pedagogy such as those for teaching children and grade-level students. By engaging in topical discussions and putting their ideas into practice, students will move beyond conceptual understanding and ultimately improve their skills as dance educators. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN511 Advanced Pedagogy II (2 credits) Spring

Advanced Pedagogy II course focuses on application, analysis, and creation. By giving students opportunities to teach full-length classes, students will be able to analyze and evaluate their peers while developing their own philosophies and teaching ideals. The course trains students to examine the contextual complexities of dance education and to develop course materials with respect to higher education. By the end of this course, students will hand in a portfolio that recounts their pedagogical findings and designs for a systematic course in either classical ballet or classical Chinese dance. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN510 or instructor consent.

DAB512 Graduate Choreography I: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Fall

This course offers professional level of Classical Ballet choreography. Students are expected to first study the dance compositions, music visualization, and gradually learn to choreograph in classical ballet style by choreographing on chorus, solos, and pa de deux. Prerequisite: Professional Dance Experience or instructor consent.

DAN512 Graduate Choreography I: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Fall

This course introduces the expressive dancer to new ways of thinking and creating. In their first year of the graduate dance program, students expand their artistic potential and explore how to make their choreographic work more compelling. By tailoring thematic movement sequences to befit specific personas and considering other theatrical factors, students will learn to view their work as a whole, and most importantly, from the audience’s standpoint. This course also instills in students an appreciation for the reiterative creative process.

DAB521R Repertory I: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course introduces various repertoire to MFA students. Students will participate in critique and analysis of dance repertoire from different dance styles and genres. Discussions will be held regarding choreographic techniques, music selection, and modes of presentation.

DAN521R Repertory I: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course introduces various repertoire to MFA students. Students will participate in critique and analysis of dance repertoire from different dance styles and genres. Discussions will be held regarding choreographic techniques, music selection, and modes of presentation.

DAN523 Holistic Health for Artists (2 credits)

This course aims to introduce the concept of holistic health from both Western and Eastern perspectives with emphasis on concepts that support the learning and performing of classical Chinese dance and classical ballet. Students will finish the course with basic knowledge of how health is viewed as a holistic integration of body, mind, and spirit. This course will include lectures, group discussions, and mentored research projects.

DAN531 Acting for Stage (1 credit)

This graduate-level acting course focuses on refining acting skills with respect to clarity of expression for a variety of performance settings. It gives students the opportunity to practice and refine their performing skills by revisiting fundamental acting concepts and engaging in a wide range of improvisational exercises. Through this course, students will study the portrayal of characters and situations with reference to traditional culture and history.

DAN532 Modern Dance (2 credits)

This course introduces MFA dance students the basic technique of Graham-based Modern Dance, covering materials of level I and level II. There will also be lectures and discussions about the icon of Modern dance, Martha Graham, and her history, cultural background, choreography, and her influence on American and European culture.

DAN542 Dance Throughout the Ages (3 credits) Fall

This course provides the theoretical foundation for the advanced study of dance by exploring the philosophical, cultural, and aesthetic underpinnings of both eastern and western dances. Topics include: the origins and aesthetic basis of dance, the influence of traditional Eastern and Western ideologies on dance, the systematization and methodology of dance, the evolution of ethnic and folk dances, and the role of dance in modern society.

DAN551 Integration of Dance and Music (1 credit) Fall

This course offers students of the opportunity to make use of their knowledge and experience in the production of joint performance projects. Each course is expected to produce at least one project. For dance, this may involve choreography, directing, and dance performance. For music, this may involve composing dance music in collaboration with choreographers, conducting the music, and performing the music. The technical work related to the production project, such as sound engineering, theater lighting, or filming, may be shared among the students. The end product should be a self-contained piece, which will be performed or played for the College community at a scheduled time and venue.

DAN555 Graduate Practicum (4 credits) Spring

The practicum allows students to build their professional experience with different companies and institutions. By practicing and applying their artistic skills in real-world settings, students gain first-hand knowledge and experience related to their career goals and build professional relationships invaluable to their future careers. Students may choose to have a practicum emphasis in performance, choreography, pedagogy, production, artistic management, or any other specification directly related to their graduate studies. Regardless of their emphasis, all students receive one-on-one guidance and mentoring from assigned instructors or preceptors. All practicums are designed to help students build a strong work ethic and enhance their professional knowledge.

DAN556 Independent Study or Project (1–6 credits) Spring

Allows graduate students to explore topics of individual or professional interest that do not fall within the standard curriculum. Each Independent Study course is flexible and personalized—designed by each student with his/her guiding instructor—so that students can get the most out of their specific studies and achieve their intended goals.

DAN561 Seminar: Dance in Cultural Context (2 credits) Fall

This seminar approaches the study of dance both as an art form as well as a means of understanding different cultures by exploring the historical, cultural, and social contexts of various dance practices. It intends to help students bridge the gap between Eastern and Western dance traditions and better understand the role of dance in the global arts community. A primary focus of the course is to expose students to differences in dance traditions. Students also practice how to communicate about their dance experiences—from explanations of dance fundamentals to the description of the emotions, aesthetics, and cultural implications—and discuss how to help others better appreciate classical Chinese dance and classical ballet.

DAN563 Topics in Dance Ethnography (2 credits) Fall

This seminar course is designed to address various topics regarding selected dance forms from diverse cultural backgrounds. Students will study and analyze social, cultural, and political influences on ethnic dance forms in the past and present. Through a series of workshops, guest instructors will introduce students to various dance styles, providing them with direct exposure through active participation. Workshops include movement analysis and discussion of cultural connotations that build the underlying dance aesthetic. Topics will be determined based on guest speaker availability.

DAB601R Advanced Classical Ballet II (4 credits) Fall Spring

As the last year of a two-year studio MFA program, the course offers professional level of Classical Ballet class. The class will include advanced Ballet barre, center, and cross floor work. The excerpts from classical ballet repertoire will be taught in the center and cross floor combinations. Students are expected to know the names of the ballet syllabus, pronunciations, and the proper use of the movement. Students will also learn the classical music compositions suitable for each basic exercises and combinations. Female dancers should wear toe shoes in the class. Students will be asked to teach the classes periodically with teacher’s supervising. Prerequisite: 8 credits of DAB501R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN601R Advanced Classical Chinese Dance II (4 credits) Fall Spring

This second-year graduate course in classical Chinese dance challenges students to perform composite routines that require both expressive versatility and technical competency. The course allows students to hone their artistry and technique through self-tailored routines and stylistic solos. Apart from fundamental training, students will also receive mentorship and engage in movement exploration for particular dance pieces. They will be prompted to reflect upon their progress and develop their own artistic forte, as part of becoming a well-rounded and distinguished dancer. Prerequisite: 8 credits of DAN501R or instructor consent. (This course must be repeated once with credits awarded.)

DAN611 Psychology in Dance Education (2 credits) Spring

This course introduces the essentials of psychological principles, theories, and concepts as they apply to the educational environment related to dance. Through various activities, students will explore how to structure effective pedagogical approaches in order to meet the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of learners and to forge a positive learning atmosphere in dance education.

DAB612 Graduate Choreography II: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Spring

This course is the culmination of students' previous studies in choreography and is designed to help students come up with ideas while invoking within them with a sense of traditional aesthetics. Students will delve deeper into the realm of artistic creation by drawing inspiration from works on various levels—from historical narrative works to contemporary artistic interpretations, and from the effective development of choreographic elements to what makes a dance piece poignant and powerful. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN512 or instructor consent.

DAN612 Graduate Choreography II: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Spring

This course is the culmination of students' previous studies in choreography and is designed to help students come up with ideas while invoking within them with a sense of traditional aesthetics. Students will delve deeper into the realm of artistic creation by drawing inspiration from works on various levels—from historical narrative works to contemporary artistic interpretations, and from the effective development of choreographic elements to what makes a dance piece poignant and powerful. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN512 or instructor consent.

DAB621R Repertory II: Classical Ballet (2 credits) Fall Spring

Repertory II offers in-depth critique and analysis of dance repertoire specific to each MFA students' dance concentration. Students will delve into choreographic elements used specifically for classical ballet repertoire.

DAN621R Repertory II: Classical Chinese Dance (2 credits) Fall Spring

Repertory II offers in-depth critique and analysis of dance repertoire specific to each MFA students' dance concentration. Students will delve into choreographic elements used specifically for classical Chinese dance repertoire.

DAN623 Dance Kinesiology (2 credits) Fall

An investigation into the field of dance science, this course will introduce students to the human skeletal system; joint biomechanics; muscle origin, insertion, and action; and the concept of tensegrity in biomechanics. It will explore the principles of physical structure, function, and dynamic alignment as they relate to dance performance enhancement and injury prevention. The course will introduce students to healthy living concepts such as nutrition and holistic mind-body connections. Course activities will include lectures, class discussion, skill and technique demonstrations, and relevant audiovisual content.

DAN641 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Chinese Dance I (2 credits) Fall

Designed for students who are technically proficient in other dance forms, this course will heighten students' breadth of skill, allowing them to practice Classical Chinese Dance technique and movements. The course will feature various exercises on the flexibility and capabilities of the legs and the waist while helping students to acquire a growing sensitivity to the shift of the center of gravity in movements. Through barre, floor and center exercises, students learn to master individual movements, combinations, and turning and acquire coordination among the neck, the chest, and the waist.

DAN642 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Chinese Dance II (2 credits) Spring

For this rotation of Intermediate Techniques of Classical Chinese Dance II, the course builds upon the skills students have attained in the previous Classical Chinese Dance course by introducing more advanced-level movements and more difficult routines that require more control, coordination, and technical competency. The course continues to develop students' body flexibility and capabilities in classical Chinese dance by focusing on developing students' ability to perform different types of jumps flipping, turning, and movement control. At the same time, students will be guided to explore the expressive and dramatic qualities of the bodily movements. Gradually, they will gain a deeper understanding of the concepts of essence (jing 精), energy (qi 氣), spirit (shen 神), body postures (shen fa 身法), and momentum in rhythm (dong lü 動律) in classical Chinese dance. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN 641 or instructor consent.

DAN645 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Ballet I (2 credits) Fall

This course aims to instruct students who are technically proficient in other dance forms with intermediate techniques of classical ballet. This course will broaden students' range of skills, allowing them to practice ballet fundamentals and beginning to intermediate-level technique and movements. The course will feature various exercises on barre and center, as well as targeted practice in various leaps, turns, and steps in ballet.

DAN646 Intermediate Techniques of Classical Ballet II (2 credits) Fall

For this rotation, the course builds upon the skills students have attained in the previous ballet course by introducing advanced-level movements and more difficult routines that require more control, coordination, and technical competency. Aside from regular barre and center work, students will also practice various solo enchaînements while examining and performing excerpts from classic repertoire, which allow students to refine their artistry and perform with further emphasis on character and musical style. By the end of this course, students will be versed in ballet terminology and proficient in intermediate-level ballet technique. Prerequisite: 2 credits of DAN645 or instructor consent.

DAN650 Master’s Project (6 credits) Spring

The Master’s Project is a yearlong endeavor that allows students to research and contribute knowledge to the field of dance. Students work with their assigned thesis advisor to determine their topic and method of investigation. They consult with their advisor frequently for progress checks and will have the opportunity to collaborate with students from other programs during the process. By the end of the year students will have completed their project, which they will present through a concert, demonstration, and/or written documentation. The goal of the master’s project is to validate students' abilities to investigate and bring to light new perspectives and understandings within the field of classical Chinese dance or classical ballet.

DAN663 Perspectives on Dance Aesthetics (2 credits) Spring

This is a seminar course. Through a series of lecture topics, graduates will be given opportunities to develop their aesthetic tastes and refine their aesthetic preferences. Students will be exposed to a range of repertoire; afterwards, they will analyze them within the context of aesthetic principles. Ultimately, this course aims to motivate students to appreciate aesthetic ideals that have inspired artists for millennia and to provide new wisdom to fuel their artistic goals.

DAN671 Internship (4 credits)

Fei Tian College offers internships so that graduate students can connect knowledge gained in on-campus courses with hands-on professional experience. Students can apply to dance companies, schools and institutions, media groups, and other hosts to find internships that fit their individual specialties and interests. Internships may or may not be paid, depending on the host institution. This course aims to help students think more about their career development. Other than completing assigned duties and demonstrating professional competencies, graduate students will need to evaluate themselves by reflecting on their personal strengths, where they need to improve, and what actions they should take to achieve their goals. While internships are not required for graduation, they are strongly encouraged as they can enhance a student’s résumé and allow students to explore different fields of interest while gaining practical experience.

LAS550 Research Methodology in the Arts (2 credits)

This class presents an overview of research methodology in the arts with a concentration in dance research. Qualitative and quantitative methods are explored through readings, lectures, practical application, discussions, and written assignments.

LAS522 Seminar in Performing Arts Management (3 credits)

This course provides an overview on performing arts management, and its various structural components and practices. Students will learn key concepts and terminology, and essential managerial knowledge for running companies and organizations. The course culminates with a final project, in which students will create a theoretical model for a performing arts company or organization, ultimately preparing students to play leadership roles in the field of performing arts management.

15.14 Graduate Music Courses

MUS510 Graduate Music Theory (3 credits)

This course consolidates the knowledge and skills acquired in the undergraduate music theory sequence while helping students develop skills in Schenkerian analysis and phrase rhythm analysis. The central question is: How do performers, performer-teachers, and composers apply knowledge of music theory to their artistic creativity? The course emphasizes listening, which requires integrating the perception of musical sound with the theoretical/conceptual knowledge of music. Students are expected to hear the nuances in a piece of music in light of their analysis of a score.

MUS511 Graduate Music Theory for Vocalists

This course consolidates the knowledge and skills acquired in the undergraduate Western music theory sequence with special focus on the needs of vocalists. There is a heavy emphasis on listening, which requires students to integrate the perception of musical sound with the theoretical/conceptual knowledge of music.

MUS513 Analysis of Great Works of Traditional Chinese Music (3 credits)

This course analyzes 14 works of Chinese music in some detail: “The Top 10 Pieces of Classical Chinese Music” (中國十大古曲), three works featuring China’s different regions, and the famous Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto composed in the 1950s. We examine issues such as original notation, compositional structure, history of transmission, performance versions (or schools), and the aesthetic principles underlying different modern and contemporary renditions. For Butterfly Lovers, we also consider how the composers expected performers to adapt their playing to convey Chinese musical characteristics.

MUS520R, 620R Graduate Orchestra I, II (1 credit each)

All MM students, apart from voice students, are required to play in a College-affiliated or other professional-level orchestra every semester throughout the program of study. Therefore, such students much register for this course at least four times (4 semesters) for one (1) credit per semester. Playing in a professional orchestra requires 1) learning all the music ahead of time; 2) attending all rehearsals on time; 3) attending all public performances, which could entail some travel; and 4) fulfilling other duties as assigned.

MUS521R, 621R Graduate Major Instrument I, II (Western) / MUS522R, 622R Graduate Major Instrument I, II (Chinese) / (4 credits each)

Every MM student not majoring in voice is required to take and repeat Graduate Major Instrument I and II for a total of 16 credits. This course sequence aims to perfect all aspects of a student’s mastery of an instrument, be it Western or Chinese, while developing the student’s command of the standard repertoire of his/her instrument. Every MM student enrolled in these courses is entitled to a free one-hour private weekly instrumental lesson with an instructor. During the first week of each semester, the student should work out a list of repertoire for that semester in consultation with the instructor.

MUS523R, 623R Graduate Chamber Music I, II (1 credit each)

This studio course expands students' ensemble repertoire, improves ensemble skills, and encourages more personal responsibility in creating polished artistic performances. Students will perform the assigned repertoire in a recital examination.

MUS525R, 625R Piano for Vocalists (1 credit each)

Private instruction in piano for voice majors in graduate standing. Enrolled students will have one private 30-minute lesson per week.

MUS526R Ensemble with Voice (2 credits each)

This course offers voice majors opportunities to work with different instrumental ensembles, including orchestras in studio and rehearsal settings, plus in subsequent performance of short recitals or operatic works.

MUS527R, 627R Graduate Major Voice I, II (4 credits each)

Every MM student majoring in voice is required to take and repeat Graduate Major Voice I and II for a total of 16 credits. This course sequence aims to perfect all aspects of a student’s mastery of the voice, while developing the student’s command of the standard repertoire. Every MM student enrolled in these courses is entitled to a free one-hour private weekly voice lesson with an instructor. During the first week of each semester, the student should work out a list of repertoire for that semester in consultation with the instructor.

MUS528R, 628R Graduate Instrumental Accompaniment I, II (0.5 credit each)

This applied course sequence provides students with experience in accompanying individuals or groups in studio and rehearsal settings, plus in subsequent performance. The time commitment is comparable to that of ensemble participation. Piano students collaborate with vocalists and instrumentalists in the department and sometimes with professional musicians.

MUS529R, 629R Graduate Dance Class Accompaniment I, II (0.5 credit each)

This studio course sequence is designed to prepare the student to accompany dance classes using the prominent styles competently and properly. The student is assigned to an advanced dance class to gain hands-on experience and broaden the skills and professional competencies of the piano accompanist.

MUS540 Topics in Western Music History (3 credits)

The topics covered may vary from year to year, depending on the instructor. Students will develop critical thinking about how to interpret and perform music in convincing and historically informed ways. Guest speakers may be invited to introduce the featured period instruments.

MUS541 Graduate Orchestral Literature (3 credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the orchestral styles of the late 18th to the late 19th century. The focus is on the changes in orchestration and harmonic language over time.

MUS542, 642 Vocal Literature - Analysis & Appreciation I, II (3 credits each)

Through exposure to a renowned classic repertoire for solo voice from around the world, students gain an increased recognition and understanding of various forms of solo vocal music, become more aware of their significance in musical arts and styles, develop the ability to appreciate and analyze different types of vocal works, and increase proficiency from in-class performances. The prerequisite for MUS642 is MUS542 or instructor consent.

MUS543, 643 Vocal Methods from Around the World I, II (3 credits each)

This course sequence examines the main characteristics of a variety of singing styles from around the world, with a historical review and emphasis on the methods and techniques of vocal production associated with the Italian bel canto, German, French, English, and Chinese styles of singing. Students will explore the physiological process of sound production, expand their understanding of the vocal methods' historical and cultural context, improve their skills, and learn how to apply various vocal techniques to different styles of music while developing a keen awareness of vocal health. The prerequisite for MUS643 is MUS543 or instructor consent.

MUS544 Graduate Piano Literature (3 credits)

This course is a graduate-level in-depth survey of music for the piano, from the Baroque period to the contemporary era. Through lectures, reading and listening assignments, analysis, and performance projects, students explore period instruments, musical styles, repertoire, and performance practice. This course also covers the socio-cultural context that influenced major composers and their works.

MUS545, 645 Topics in Chinese Music I, II (3 credits each)

The focus of this course sequence varies from year to year depending on the instructor. In general, the topics are designed to expand the students' horizons for research, approaching traditional Chinese music from both micro and macro perspectives. For example, examination may be made of the smallest unit of music, a musical note, and how in Chinese music it can be broken down into even smaller elements and finer nuances that go beyond the notation on the musical score. From a larger perspective, the course may explore traditional aesthetic views on how the spirit of an entire musical piece may differ depending on the inner spirit of the performer.

MUS550R Jury (0 credit)

MM students are required to perform for a jury at the end of both the first and second semesters of the program of study. The program played for the jury should be around 25–30 minutes in duration (music only). Pass/No Pass grading scale.

MUS552 Graduate Independent Study in Music (1–4 credits)

This course gives students an opportunity to investigate a topic outside the current music curriculum. All independent study courses must be approved in advance and be closely supervised by a faculty member. An independent study proposal must include a course outline developed through consultation between the student and faculty supervisor, and it will serve as the official course description. The course may take the form of faculty-supervised research, study, or a project. This course may be repeated for credit.

MUS555 Graduate Practicum (3 credits)

The practicum allows students to build their professional experience with leading companies. By practicing and applying their musical skills in real-world settings, students gain first-hand knowledge and experience related to their career goals and build professional relationships invaluable to their future careers. All students receive one-on-one guidance and mentoring from assigned instructors or preceptors. All practicums are designed to help students build a strong work ethic and enhance their professional knowledge. This course may be repeated.

MUS651 Graduate Recital (0 credit)

All MM students are required to give a graduate recital in order to graduate, usually during the last semester of the program of study. The duration of the recital should be around 55–60 minutes (music only). The student giving the recital must submit the program notes (3–4 pages) to the Department for review and approval at least one month prior to the scheduled recital date. The recital is evaluated by a panel of at least four jury members, excluding the recitalist’s instructor. Pass/No Pass grading scale.

MUS661 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Music (3 credits)

This course places music students' study of Chinese and Western music thus far at the College into a broader context so as to help students: 1) acquire a deeper understanding of the College’s mission and vision, and 2) develop the skills needed to address the different approaches to integrating Western classical music and non-Western musical traditions. There are four parts. Part I highlights the rigorous moral standards of artists in traditional China. Part II examines cases of blending Western classical music with non-Western musical traditions by composers of different nationalities. Part III briefly reviews the history of Western music in China and examines examples from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong of how Chinese and Western music have been combined. Part IV studies selected Chinese-Western music compositions with a view to understanding the underlying moral and aesthetic principles.

MUS671 Graduate Internship (1–3 credits)

Through internships, graduate students can think more deeply about their own career development and connect their academic learning with hands-on professional experience. They can apply to orchestras, performing arts companies, schools and institutions, media groups, and other hosts depending on their individual specialties and interests. Internships may or may not be paid, depending on the host institution. Other than completing assigned duties and demonstrating professional competencies, graduate students will need to reflect on their personal strengths, where they need to improve, and what actions they should take to achieve their goals. While internships are not required for graduation, they are strongly encouraged.

15.15 Graduate Data Science Courses

CIS431 Modern Applied Statistical Learning (3 credits) Fall

This course is designed to provide students with hands-on, practical experience in statistical learning methods such that they can apply them to solve real-world problems. Students enhance their understanding of statistical analysis and inference while getting trained on industry-standard software packages. Prerequisite: None

CIS441 Cloud Computing and Big Data (3 credits) Fall

In this course, students will learn cloud computing concepts using cloud infrastructure provided by the largest cloud vendors, Amazon (AWS) and Microsoft (Azure). Students will also learn Big Data concepts, including databases, relational and non-relational databases, SQL, etc. Finally, students will get some hands-on experiences with cloud computing and Big Data technologies. Prerequisite: None

CIS536 Applied Machine Learning (3 credits) Spring

This is a required course for the MS in Data Science program. It extends certain topics of CIS431 Modern Applied Statistical Learning and focuses on the theoretical basis as well as applications of the state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms. Students will get familiar with Python machine learning tools and use them for projects. Prerequisite: CIS431

CIS543 Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing (3 credits) Fall

This course covers advanced topics on the latest developments in machine learning, focusing on the application of deep neural networks (deep learning) to computer vision and natural language processing. Students will become familiar with Python deep learning frameworks like TensorFlow and Pytorch and be able to use them for projects. Prerequisite: CIS536

STA401 Regression Analysis (3 credits) Fall

This course covers topics including simple and multiple linear regression models, logistic, autocorrelation and nonlinear regression, inference about model parameters and predictions, diagnostic and remedial measures about the model, independent variable selection, and multicollinearity. Students will understand the principles for applied regression model-building techniques in various fields of study. Prerequisite: None

DAS421 Sample Survey and Customer Analytics (3 credits) Fall

This course will introduce students to the methods, tools and techniques of survey sampling, survey designs, and marketing analytics and will demonstrate how to practically apply these analytics to real-world business decisions. Hands-on experience with various analytical tools and software is a key component of the course. Prerequisite: None

DAS422 Exploratory Data Analysis and Visualization (3 credits) Spring

In this course students will learn techniques and algorithms for creating effective visualizations based on principles from graphic design, visual art, perceptual psychology, and cognitive science. R and other statistics applications (such as Python) are used. The course is designed for both students interested in applying visualization in their work, and students interested in building better visualization tools and systems. Prerequisite: None

DAS441 Data Mining for Business (3 credits) Spring

This course seeks to equip students with a solid understanding of opportunities, techniques, and critical challenges in using data mining and predictive modeling in a business setting. The focus is to enable students to develop the ability to translate business challenges into data mining problems and apply predictive modeling technologies to improve business decisions. Prerequisite: None

DAS561 Capstone Project (3 credits) Fall

Students are required to take this capstone course in their final semester of the Data Science Master program. Students will use Python, R, and/or other specialized analysis tools to synthesize concepts from data analytics and visualization as applied to industrial problems. Instructed by a faculty mentor, students will develop comprehensive problem-solving capabilities in data science from problem definition stage through the delivery of a solution through this capstone project. Prerequisite: Department approval

STA411 Statistical Inference (3 credits) Fall

This course will introduce the underlying theories and methods of statistical data display, analysis, inference, statistical decision-making, and ANOVA. The course will cover topics including basic concepts of probability, maximum likelihood estimation, sufficiency, completeness, ancillary, unbiasedness, consistency, efficiency, asymptotic approximations, ANOVA, and regression. Prerequisite: None

STA421 Design and Analysis of Experiments (3 credits) Spring

In this course students learn how to use the methods of statistical design of experiments (DOE) in order to design efficient experiments, analyze results correctly and present them in a clear fashion. Statistical DOE is used widely in both industry and academia. Graduate and undergraduate students from any field of science or engineering can use the methods learned in the course in their projects and research. Prerequisite: None

STA441 Survival Analysis (3 credits) Spring

This course introduces basic concepts and methods for analyzing survival time data obtained from following individuals until occurrence of an event or their loss to follow-up. Students will learn the characteristics of survival (time to event) data and building the link between distribution, survival, hazard functions, non-parametric, semi-parametric, and parametric models, and two-sample test techniques. During the class, students will also learn how to use R to analyze survival data. Prerequisite: STA411

STA531 Multivariate Analysis (3 credits) Fall

This course will introduce and explore multivariate data and its related inference techniques. It will cover topics including advanced linear algebra, multivariate normal distribution, principal components, factor analysis, discriminant function, cluster analysis, Hoteling’s T2 and MANOVA. This course helps students develop and sharpen their mathematical and statistical skills by practicing the statistical techniques in an applied context. Prerequisite: STA411

STA535 Bayesian Analysis (3 credits) Spring

This course will introduce Bayesian statistical inference. It will cover priors, posteriors, Bayes rule, Bayesian inference for one and two parameter problems, Bayesian testing and model diagnostics, Bayesian computation, hierarchical Bayesian methods, and model comparisons. Prerequisite: STA411

STA545 Nonparametric Statistics (3 credits) Spring

Students will learn the applications of nonparametric statistical methods rather than mathematical development. The basic concepts in nonparametric analysis will be introduced, as well as computational and computer competence, in applied nonparametric statistics. Topics include paired and independent samples, structured data, survival analysis, linear and logistic regression, categorical data, and robust estimation. These new methodologies are examined and applied to simulated and real datasets using R. Prerequisite: STA411


16. Directories

16.1 Administrators and Staff

Administrators

Y. Joseph Zhao, PhD
Interim President

Peter Y. Li, PhD
Provost

Vina Lee
Vice President of Performing Arts

Yun Song, PhD
Chief Financial Officer

Grace Freed
Senior Director of Student Services

Ivy Che
Senior Director of Operations

Karen Chang
Senior Director of Advancement and IR

Mary Silver
Library Director

Student Support Offices

Office of Graduate Studies
Dr. Shujia Gong

Office of Admissions and Financial Aid
Ms. Jade Zhan, Ms. Wei Dong

Office of Academic Services
Ms. Grace Freed, Dr. Tony Liu

Office of the Registrar
Ms. Ping Liu, Ms. Anna Chan

Office of Student Affairs
Mr. Evan Mantyk, Dr. Marilyn Torley

Office of Student Financial Services
Ms. Joan Wang

Office of International Services
Ms. Emily Kutolowski, Ms. Alison Chen, Ms. Ying Chen

16.2 General Education Faculty

Dr. Jim C. Li
Associate Professor, Chair
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Shujia Gong
Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering
George Mason University

Dr. Tony Liu
Associate Professor 
Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Pathology
Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Zheng Qu
Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences
The University of Chicago

Ms. Kaishin Yen
Associate Professor
M.I.A.
Columbia University

Mr. Eric Bess
Assistant Professor 
MFA in Fine Art
Academy of Art University

Dr. Ellen L. Jin
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Applied mechanics and Mathematics
Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Mr. Matthew Kutolowski
Assistant Professor
M.A.
Columbia University

Dr. Eve Y. Lee
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Community and Regional Planning
University of British Columbia, Canada

Dr. Gloria J. Liu
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Brad McDuffie
Assistant Professor 
Ph.D. in Literature and Criticism
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Ms. Hannah Han
Instructor
MA in Ancient Chinese Literature
South China Normal University

Ms. Grace Freed
Lecturer
M.S.
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Michelle Xu
Lecturer
PharmD
Purdue University

Mr. Nan-Cheng Chen
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MM in Performance
Julliard School of Music

Mr. Stephen Grodnick
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MA in Social Studies
Lehman College

Dr. Tanya Harrison-Huston
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology
Wright State University

Dr. Hong Jiang
Adjunct Assistant Professor
PhD in Geography
Clark University

Mr. Dan Pelonis
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MFA magna cum laude. Painting
The New York Academy of Art

Dr. Jason Wang
Adjunct Instructor
Ph.D. in Condensed Matter Physics
University of Houston

16.3 Arts Administration Faculty

Dr. Miriam Sanchez
Assistant Professor
Ph.D in Strategic Planning and Technology
University of the State of Puebla, Mexico

Dr. Marilyn Torley
Associate Professor 
Ed. D, School Administration
Seton Hall University

Dr. Frank Xie
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. in Marketing and MBA in Finance
Georgia State University

Dr. Li Li
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Economics
University of California-San Diego

Fine Arts and Design courses are taught by the Fine Arts and Design Faculty.

Dance courses are taught by the Dance Faculty.

16.4 Biomedical Sciences Faculty

Dr. Tony Liu
Associate Professor, Chair
Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Pathology
Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Sean Lin
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. in Microbiology and immunology
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Dr. Michelle Xu
Lecturer
PharmD
Purdue University

Dr. Tanya Harrison-Huston
Adjunct Assistant
Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology
Wright State University

Dr. Damon Noto
Adjunct Associate Professor
MD
Mount Sinai Medical School

Dr. Wenyi Wang
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Pharmacology and Physiology
University of Chicago

16.5 Classical Chinese Dance Faculty

Ms. Christina Li
Assistant Professor, Chair
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Mr. D.F. Lee
Distinguished Professor

Ms. H. Sue Guo
Professor
Central South College of Fine Arts

Ms. Vina Lee
Professor, Vice President of Performing Arts
Beijing Academy of Dance, Beijing

Ms. Tia Zhang
Professor
Beijing Academy of Dance, Beijing

Mr. Yung-Chia Chen
Associate Professor
Central University for Nationalities, Beijing

Mr. Gu Xuan
Associate Professor
Capital Normal University and Beijing Dance Academy

Mr. Gu Yuan
Associate Professor
Beijing Academy of Dance

Mr. Gu Yun
Associate Professor
Beijing Academy of Dance

Mr. Xuejun Wang
Associate Professor
Central University for Nationalities (China) and Beijing Academy of Dance

Ms. Xian Yuan
Associate Professor
Beijing Academy of Dance

Ms. Minghui Zhang
Associate Professor
Beijing Academy of Dance

Mr. Chad Chen
Assistant Professor
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Mr. William Li
Assistant Professor
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Ms. Melody Qin
Assistant Professor
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Ms. Angelia Wang
Assistant Professor
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Ms. Hsiao-Hung Lin
Instructor
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Mr. Albert Yang
Instructor
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Mr. Yue Yu
Instructor
Dalian Art School

Ms. Michelle Ren
Adjunct Associate Professor

16.6 Dance Faculty

Ms. Yung Yung Tsuai
Professor, Chair
BA in Dance
Empire State College

Dr. Vladimir Roje
Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Musicology and Musical Art
National Academy of Music, Bulgaria

Ms. Alison Chen
Assistant Professor 
MFA in Classical Chinese Dance
Fei Tian College

Ms. Jannette Rawls
Assistant Professor 
MFA in Dance 
Fei Tian College

Mr. Mingye Liu
Lecturer 
MFA in Dance
Fei Tian College

16.7 Data Science Faculty

Dr. Kevin Ren
Professor, Chair 
Ph.D. in Statistics
University of Missouri

Dr. Zheng Qu
Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences
The University of Chicago

Dr. Samuel Zhou
Associate Professor 
Ph.D. in Computer Science
Rutgers University

Dr. Miao Yu
Assistant Professor 
Ph.D. in Fluid Mechanics
Rutgers University

Dr. Qihu Zhang
Adjunct Instructor
Ph.D. in Statistics
University of Georgia

Dr. Zhanglin Cui
Adjunct Professor
Ph.D. in Genetics and Breeding
North Carolina State University

Dr. Suman Srinivasan
Adjunct Associate Professor
Ph.D. in Computer Science
Columbia University

16.8 Fine Arts and Design Faculty

Ms. Penny Zhou
Assistant Professor, Chair 
Diploma of Graphics Specialist 
Repin Academy of Fine Arts, Russia

Mr. Eric Bess
Assistant Professor 
MFA in Fine Art
Academy of Art University

Ms. Lillian Li
Instructor
Masters in Photography and Visual Design
Nuova Accademia DiBelle Arti, Italy

Mr. Dan Pelonis
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MFA magna cum laude. Painting
The New York Academy of Art

16.9 Music Faculty

Ms. Peijong Hsieh
Associate Professor, Chair
MM in Piano Performance
Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University
Piano

Mr. D.F. Lee
Distinguished Professor

Ms. Chia-Chi Lin
Professor
Peabody Conservatory at John’s Hopkins University
Strings, Conducting, Chamber Music

Dr. Susan Liu
Professor
M.M.
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Music Theory & History, Piano Performance

Ms. Becky Yao
Professor
M.M. in Piano Performance
Georgia State University
Piano

Ms. I-Chen Huang
Associate Professor
M.M.
L’Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris 
Strings, Chamber Music

Ms. Lisha Li
Associate Professor
M.Phil and D.Phil (A.B.D.)
Oxford University
Music Theory & History, Composition, Pipa

Ms. Yi-Chin Lin
Associate Professor
M.M.
Institute of Music of the National Chiao Tung University (Taiwan) 
Ear Training, Piano

Mr. James Geiger
Assistant Professor
M.M. in Trumpet performance
University of South Carolina School of Music
Music Theory & History, Trumpet

Dr. Chia-Jung Lee
Assistant Professor
D.M.A.
University of Texas at Austin
Music Theory & History, Winds

Dr. Yevgeniy Reznik
Assistant Professor
D.M.A.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Winds, Chamber Music

Mr. Eric Robins
Assistant Professor
M.M.
New England Conservatory
Music Theory, Trumpet

Mr. Juraj Kukan
Teaching Specialist
M.M.
Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, England
Double Bass, Chamber Music

Ms. Fan Li
Teaching Specialist
Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts, Germany
Violin, Chamber Music

Ms. Sheung-Tzu Ma
Teaching Specialist
Professional Diploma
Shanghai Conservatory of Affiliated Secondary Professional Music School
Piano, Composition

Ms. Ching-Ya Mahlen
Teaching Specialist
Music and Arts University of Vienna
Piano

Ms. Shao-Yi Deng
Adjunct Teaching Specialist
Southern China Arts University
Harp

Ms. Janara Khassenova
Adjunct Teaching Specialist
Artist Diploma Program in Piano Performance and Chamber Music
Longy School of Music
Piano

Mr. Brian Marple
Adjunct Teaching Specialist
M.A.
George Washington University
Percussion

Mr. Pavlo Baishev
Affiliated Associate Professor
Postgraduate
Tchaikovsky National Music Academy of Ukraine
Trombone, Bass Trombone

Mr. Alexander Dardykin
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
Diploma
Gnessin Russian Academy of Music
Cello

Mr. Chunlin Gu
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
Professional Diploma
Henan Opera, China
Oboe

Mr. Sergey Loginov
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
Tchaikovsky National Music Academy of Ukraine
French Horn

Ms. Paulina Mazurkiewicz
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
M.M. in Performance
Guildhall School of Music and Drama, United Kingdom
Viola

Ms. Xiaochun Qi
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
Shanghai Conservatory of Music
Erhu

Mr. Jie Shen
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
B.M. in Chinese percussion
Shanghai Conservatory of Music, China
Percussion

Mr. Rong-Wen Tsai
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
B.M. in Chinese music
Chinese Culture University, Taiwan
Dizi, Suona

Mr. Aleksander Velichko
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
Postgraduate
Gnessin Russian Academy of Music, Moscow
Bassoon

Ms. Yu Lian
Affiliated Teaching Specialist
M. M. in Performance
Fei Tian College
Pipa

16.10 Stage Production and Design Faculty

Mr. Kang-Gang Xu
Associate Professor, Chair
MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Rutgers University

Dr. Yanping Lu
Professor
Ph.D. in Cell Biology
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Ms. H. Helen Jia
Assistant Professor
MFA in Media Production
City College of New York

Ms. Peiyi Marple
Assistant Professor
MFA in Art History, Arts Administration, and Art Criticism
Tunghai University, Taiwan

Mr. Jian Hu
Adjunct Assistant Professor
MArch
University of Arizona

Ms. D. Sophie Cong
Adjunct Teaching Specialist
BA in Environmental Art Design
Central Academy of Arts and Crafts, China

Mr. Larry Bing Dye
Adjunct Teaching Specialist
BA in Photography
Harbin Normal University, China

Mr. Bill Liang
Adjunct Teaching Specialist
MS in Power Systems and Automation
Southeast University, China

Fei Tian College - Catalog